Cryoglobulinemia CVO
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Cryoglobulinemia CVO
http://www.cryoglobulinemiavasculitis.org/ Rare Blood Disease:

Cryoglobulinemia is the presence of abnormal proteins in the blood. These abnormal proteins become thick or gel-like in cold temperatures. Cryoglobulinemia causes damage and inflammation of the blood vessels throughout the body.

CVO was established to unite patients and the medical community in managing and drawing attention to cryoglobulinemia, a rare blood disease that the founder/director has battled for 23+ years.

CVO is the first and oldest organization of its kind in the world. We continue to earn worldwide recognition as a resource for patients, caretakers, medical professionals, and researchers.
Curated by Diane Dike Phd
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Power of Fruits & Vegetables

"It''s hard to argue with the health benefits of a diet rich in vegetables and fruits: Lower blood pressure; reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and proba...

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Blood disease medication earns ViroPharma upbeat analyst reviews - MarketWatch (blog)

Blood disease medication earns ViroPharma upbeat analyst reviews - MarketWatch (blog) | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
Blood disease medication earns ViroPharma upbeat analyst reviews
MarketWatch (blog)
He says the medical community is growing increasingly aware of Cinryze and it is fast becoming a preferred treatment for the blood disorder hereditary angioedema.
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Blood Disease Stops Education in Nigeria

Blood Disease Stops Education in Nigeria | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
ABUJA — Children with blood diseases in Nigeria go almost entirely undiagnosed and very few go to school. Activists say they are hoping to save lives by raising awareness of hemophilia and helping some individual ...
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(EN) - Glossary of Cardiovascular Terms | Texas Heart Institute Heart Information Center

(EN) - Glossary of Cardiovascular Terms | Texas Heart Institute Heart Information Center | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it

"Brief definitions of heart-related words used to describe the heart and blood vessels as well as cardiovascular diseases and their prevention and treatments."


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New blood test measures “everything ever linked to heart disease ...

New blood test measures “everything ever linked to heart disease ... | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
A new blood test examines numerous risk factors for heart attack, including the size and number of HDL and LDL particles and genetic markers that indicate an increased risk of heart disease.
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Stem cells enable personalized treatment for bleeding disorder ...

Stem cells enable personalized treatment for bleeding disorder ... | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
Scientists have shed light on a common bleeding disorder by growing and analysing stem cells from patients' blood to discover the cause of the disease in individual patients. The technique may enable doctors to prescribe ...
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Expert: Rare To Contract Blood-Borne Disease In Medical Setting ...

Expert: Rare To Contract Blood-Borne Disease In Medical Setting ... | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
If you're concerned about your dentist's instruments, esperts said there is something you can do about it: Ask questions.
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Pour, Shake and Stir: Rapid Point-Of-Care Testing for Multiple Diseases from a Drop of Blood

Pour, Shake and Stir: Rapid Point-Of-Care Testing for Multiple Diseases from a Drop of Blood | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it

A diagnostic “cocktail” containing a single drop of blood, a dribble of water, and a dose of DNA powder with gold particles could mean rapid diagnosis and treatment of the world’s leading diseases in the near future. The cocktail diagnostic is a homegrown brew being developed by University of Toronto’s Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) PhD student Kyryl Zagorovsky and Professor Warren Chan that could change the way infectious diseases, from HPV and HIV to malaria, are diagnosed.

 

Zagorovsky’s rapid diagnostic biosensor will allow technicians to test for multiple diseases at one time with one small sample, and with high accuracy and sensitivity. The biosensor relies upon gold particles in much the same vein as your average pregnancy test. With a pregnancy test, gold particles turn the test window red because the particles are linked with an antigen that detects a certain hormone in the urine of a pregnant woman.

 

“Gold is the best medium,” explains Chan, “because it’s easy to see. It emits a very intense colour.”

 

Currently scientists can target the particular disease they are searching for by linking gold particles with DNA strands: when a sample containing the disease gene (ie. Malaria) is present, it clumps the gold particles, turning the sample blue.

 

Rather than clumping the particles together, Zagorovsky immerses the gold particles in a DNA-based enzyme solution (DNA-zyme) that, when the disease gene is introduced, ‘snip’ the DNA from the gold particles, turning the sample red.

 

“It’s like a pair of scissors,” Zagorovsky explains, “and the target gene activates the scissors that cut the DNA links holding gold particles together.”

The advantage is that far less of the gene needs to be present for the solution to show noticeable colour changes, amplifying detection. A single DNA-zyme can clip up to 600 “links” between the target genes.

 

Just a single drop from a biological sample such as saliva or blood can potentially be tested in parallel, so that multiple diseases can be tested for in one sitting.

 

But the team has also demonstrated that they are able to transform the testing solution into a powder, making it light and far easier to ship than solutions, which degrade over time. Powder can be stored for years at a time, and offers hope that the technology can be developed into efficient, cheap, over-the-counter tests for diseases such as HIV and malaria for developing countries, where access to portable diagnostics is a necessity.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Understanding the Different Types of Blood Disease - Part 2

Understanding the Different Types of Blood Disease - Part 2 | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
In our last post, we talked about two kinds of blood disorder. Today, we will look at high blood cholesterol, sepsis, leukemia, and hemophilia.
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Red blood cell production relies on white blood cell help

Red blood cell production relies on white blood cell help | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it

Red blood cell production in the bone marrow is a precarious process. Too few RBCs and you can become anemic; too many and you could be suffering from polycythemia vera, a rare, so-called ‘myeloproliferative’ genetic disorder marked by an abnormally high RBC count. Now, researchers have identified a surprising player in the regulation of RBC production under these disease conditions. Reporting online today in Nature Medicine, two independent teams describe the pivotal role of macrophages—amoeba-like white blood cells responsible for digesting harmful foreign microbes and removing old or dying cells—for generating RBCs in both anemic and over-proliferative conditions.

 

In one study, geneticist Stefano Rivella and his colleagues at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York administered a drug that selectively kills macrophages in a mouse model of polycythemia vera. In these mice, RBCs are generated at almost twice the normal amount, leading to viscous blood, enlarged organs and increased risk for strokes and heart disease. The drug, called clodronate, appeared to cure these symptoms, however, drastically lowering macrophage population and bringing RBC counts back to normal levels compared with a control group of animals treated with saline.

 

These findings were independently confirmed by Paul Frenette, a stem cell biologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, also in New York. His team used a genetically modified mouse in which macrophages expressed a gene that made them vulnerable to a toxin and arrived at similar conclusions. “When we depleted macrophages in this disease, we actually corrected the disease,” Frenette says. “Maybe this could be a new therapy for this type of disease, which is unexpected.”

 

Rivella and his group also studied beta-thalassemia, another inherited blood disorder characterized by lowered RBC counts and severe anemia. Paradoxically, RBC precursor cells are actually overproduced in this disease, but they never fully mature and subsequently build up in the spleen and liver, leading to organ enlargement. When treated with clodronate, however, genetically modified mice with a beta-thalassemia-like condition showed statistically significant increased RBC counts. Rivella chalks this effect up to reduced precursor cell numbers and organ size, allowing better circulation of healthy cells. “Take out the macrophages and the ability of RBC precursors to expand and proliferate is decreased,” he says.

 

Interestingly, when normal mice were macrophage-depleted, there were no observable effects on RBC levels. Both Frenette and Rivella believe that this indicates macrophages modulate RBC production only during stress or abnormal conditions. The precise mechanisms for this new stress-related role remain opaque, although Frenette’s group showed evidence that an adhesion molecule known as VCAM1 and a bone marrow protein known as BMP 4 could play a part.

 

For now, patients suffering from disorders such as polycythemia vera and beta-thalassemia will have to wait until these mechanisms are fully understood. Macrophage depletion in both studies was temporary, as cessation of treatment led to macrophage and symptom recovery. In addition, macrophage depletion can have severe consequences in immunity, bone formation and many other systems. Clodronate “is a really great drug to do these experiments, but it’s not something I’d suggest to patients,” says Rivella.

On the flipside, boosting macrophage levels could prove beneficial in some settings. For instance, Frenette’s group gave mice bone marrow transplants and showed that wiping out macrophage levels significantly delayed RBC recovery. The finding, Frenette says, “would suggest that methods to improve macrophage functional recovery might be useful in a situation such as bone marrow transplantation where you need to make more red blood cells faster.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Cause of Blood Urine in Polycystic Kidney Disease Naturally - PKD Treatment

The Cause of Blood Urine in Polycystic Kidney Disease Naturally - PKD Treatment | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
Blood urine or hematuria in Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) can be microscopic or gross. The onset of blood urine is an alarm of some underlying severe healthy problems.

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Monitoring of blood pressure for reduced risks on this World Health ...

Monitoring of blood pressure for reduced risks on this World Health ... | Cryoglobulinemia CVO | Scoop.it
It is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries (blood vessels) is elevated. Lifestyle factors are the most important contributors, as well as genetic characteristics. An estimated one billion people are ...
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