Crowdsourcing in Education
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Crowdsourcing in Education
Crowdsourcing Used in Learning
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Crowdsourcing: The Teacher-Voice Solution? - Teaching Now ...

Crowdsourcing: The Teacher-Voice Solution? - Teaching Now ... | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
Davis mentions that teachers as a group are already using crowdsourcing to rate and review online lesson plans and to fundraise for classroom supplies. So why not use it to contribute to larger systemic solutions as well?
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First Trial of Crowdsourced Grading for Computer Science Homework

First Trial of Crowdsourced Grading for Computer Science Homework | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
That looks like a promising way to make better use of an instructor or teaching assistant's time while improving the learning experience for the student. Of course, a big factor is the user ...
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How one University of Minnesota professor crowdsourced the ...

How one University of Minnesota professor crowdsourced the ... | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
For those academics unfamiliar with crowdsourcing, here's an example to get your juices flowing: University of Minnesota chemistry professor Chris Cramer recently went on Twitter to ask what math requirements were for chemistry majors at other...
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Treehouse Lands $7M From Kaplan, Social+Capital To Help You Learn To Code - TechCrunch

Treehouse Lands $7M From Kaplan, Social+Capital To Help You Learn To Code - TechCrunch | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
Treehouse Lands $7M From Kaplan, Social+Capital To Help You Learn To Code TechCrunch Treehouse Founder and CEO Ryan Carson told us at the time its motivation was, essentially, a response to the absurd cost of higher education — a cost that is...
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Ga. Tech to Offer a MOOC-Like Online Master's Degree, at Low Cost

Ga. Tech to Offer a MOOC-Like Online Master's Degree, at Low Cost | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it

In an unprecedented arrangement that involves aspects of MOOCs and a major technology company's support, the Georgia Institute of Technology will soon begin offering an online master's degree in computer science at an unusually low cost.

 

Georgia Tech announced on Tuesday that it would work with Udacity, a company that runs massive open online courses by well-known professors, to offer a series of online courses that students could complete to earn a graduate degree from the university.

AT&T is donating $2-million to help get the program started, and the company will play an active role in some courses, if professors agree—offering guest speakers or suggesting class projects.

 

Courses in the program will be free through Udacity's site, made up of video lectures and computer-graded homework assignments. Students who want the possibility of credit or a degree will have to apply for admission to the university and pay tuition, and those students will get access to teaching assistants and, in some cases, have their assignments graded by people.

 

The fees put a top-ranked computer-science program at a price point more comparable to a typical community college—about $134 per credit, compared with the normal rates at Georgia Tech of $472 per credit for in-state students and $1,139 per credit for out-of-state students, said Rafael L. Bras, the university's provost. The program is expected to take most students three years to complete, and cost less than $7,000.

 

The university and Udacity will split the revenue from the paying students, with 60 percent going to Georgia Tech and 40 percent to Udacity, said Mr. Bras. "Udacity and Georgia Tech split the net income of this and, obviously, the net losses, if we have any—which we hope we don't," he said.

 

A partnership between San Jose State University and another MOOC provider, edX, has sparked complaints from professors there, who worry that the university is headed down a path that could lead to fewer faculty members and lower-quality education.

 

Georgia Tech believes its project is different. "San Jose State is a different situation, and I'm not going to comment on it," said Mr. Bras. "We're talking about a professional master's degree."

 

He argued that technology can help reduce the cost of instruction without reducing quality. "This is not going to be a watered-down degree," he said. "It's going to be as hard and at a level of excellence of a regular degree."

Students on the degree track will have to take tests in person at one of 4,000 proctored testing centers run by Pearson VUE, but most of the students probably will never travel to the campus itself.

 

Georgia Tech officials are betting that there are plenty of students willing to pay to get a computer-science degree from the well-known research institution. By the end of the three-year pilot, officials hope to have thousands of students enrolled.

A New Approach

Russell Poulin, deputy director for research and analysis at the WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies, said that while other colleges offer online computer-science degrees, the program at Georgia Tech is unique in that it is trying to reduce costs by adapting teaching for an online setting rather than simply transferring traditional methods online.

 

"The toughest part typically is overcoming some of the politics around that," said Mr. Poulin, whose organization promotes online education as part of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.

 

Officials at Georgia Tech say they have won all the necessary signoffs. "This program has been approved at every relevant level of the University System of Georgia, up to and including the Board of Regents," says a fact sheetabout the project.

 

Mr. Poulin said that the involvement of AT&T could raise concerns, though.

"They'll need to be open in how much influence AT&T has in the curriculum and faculty, and what is taught—and in how much dependence does Georgia Tech have on that," said Mr. Poulin. "That would be the concern as far as keeping the academic integrity of the program so it doesn't just become a training program for AT&T."

 

But Mr. Bras, the provost, dismissed such worries. "I don't have any concerns of that," he said. The program will use the university's existing curriculum, he said, and AT&T employees will get no special consideration in the admissions process.

 

AT&T says one of its goals is to preserve a pipeline of qualified applicants. The company is also signaling its willingness to take seriously those who study online.

 

"These students will never have to set foot in a classroom to earn degrees on par with those received in traditional on-campus settings—degrees that will be equally valued by their future employers," wrote Scott S. Smith, senior vice president for human resources at AT&T, in a blog post. "By harnessing the power of MOOCs, we can embark on a new era for higher education and for the development of a highly skilled work force."

 

Perhaps the most unusual aspect of the project is how quickly it all came together. That troubled Mr. Poulin, who said that many recent online-education efforts have learned things by trial and error that they could have guessed by reading previous research reports.

 

"If you run headlong into the forest," he said, "you're probably going to run into a few trees, rather than stopping along the side and saying, Oh, there's a map here; we could probably go through the forest without hitting trees..


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Smithstorian's curator insight, May 15, 2013 12:17 PM

Comments section is equally interesting!

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Professors Say Technology Helps in Logistics, Not Learning - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Professors Say Technology Helps in Logistics, Not Learning - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it

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Smithstorian's curator insight, January 30, 2013 8:24 AM

With PowerPoint presentations, YouTube videos, and online portals, technology is playing an increasingly important role in college classrooms and lecture halls. But are those technologies improving learning?

 

A study published this month in the journal Science, Technology, & Human Values found that professors at research-intensive universities believe the answer to that question is no.

 

A report on the study, “Technological Change and Professional Control in the Professoriate,” includes interviews with more than 40 professors at three universities. It suggests that professors often use such technologies for logistical purposes rather than to improve learning.

 

“There is little or no indication that innovative pedagogy motivates technological use in the classroom, which sort of flies in the face of how the use of information-based instructional technologies is usually presented,” said David R. Johnson, a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Georgia and the study’s author.

 

Instead, the report suggests, technology is more often used by professors for managerial reasons, such as to help with the demands of growing class sizes. While Mr. Johnson said most college administrators are not yet requiring professors to use instructional technologies, the pressure of teaching more than 300 students at once, for example, leads faculty members to adopt technology in ways unrelated to improving learning.

 

“You’re being told that you have to shoulder a larger and larger share of the burden, and here’s some technology that will help you do it,” said one anthropologist quoted in the report.

 

Mr. Johnson said the findings show a gap between how universities market their use of technology—often framing technology as more sophisticated than prior approaches to instruction—and how the faculty actually uses it. He called this a “ceremonial myth.”

 

“It’s a symbol that’s emphasized in environment, but not necessarily acted upon by members of the organization,” Mr. Johnson said. “It’s an attempt to communicate legitimacy to parents, students, and prospective employers, but for the faculty who would actually use these tools, it’s not seen as a valuable tool, and it can even be a detriment to student learning.”

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Crowdsourcing Education Innovation, For Cash

Crowdsourcing Education Innovation, For Cash | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
One of the world's largest educational publishers is turning to crowdsourcing for their next great product idea.
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Growing a Farm With Crowd-Sourced Money

This is the VOA Special English Agriculture Report, from voaspecialenglish.com | http Kickstarter is a website where people give money to support creative projects. It started in two thousand nine, mostly to help artists and musicians.
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Education Secretary: Tech Will Never Replace Great Teachers - Mashable

Education Secretary: Tech Will Never Replace Great Teachers - Mashable | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
Education Secretary: Tech Will Never Replace Great Teachers
Mashable
Khan crowdsourced inspiration for his questions, often referring to comments made on Facebook and Twitter. See also: 9 ...
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Great teaching is Great teaching

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MOOCs and Crowdsourcing - Degree of Freedom

MOOCs and Crowdsourcing - Degree of Freedom | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
So where might crowdsourcing that taps the wisdom, energy, experiences and other resources of crowds fit in with massive open online courses? ...
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MOOCs and the Quality Question - Inside Higher Ed

MOOCs and the Quality Question - Inside Higher Ed | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
Inside Higher Ed MOOCs and the Quality Question Inside Higher Ed Many of the first MOOCs are providing quality of content, but are far behind the curve in providing quality of design, accountable instructional delivery, or sufficient resources to...
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Beyond “Disruption” - The Blue Review

Beyond “Disruption” - The Blue Review | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
The Blue Review
Beyond “Disruption”
The Blue Review
I'm not opposed to disruption; rather, I'm skeptical about the kind of disruption start-ups and tech folks promise: “paradigm-shifting” technology that improves university teaching and learning.
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20 Ways High Schools Are Using Twitter In The Classroom

20 Ways High Schools Are Using Twitter In The Classroom | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
20 Ways High Schools Are Using Twitter In The Classroom

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Education Innovation: Crowdsourcing Education

Education Innovation: Crowdsourcing Education | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
The Collision of Education, Innovation, Teaching, Learning, Imagination, Ideation, Ideas, Creativity, Collaboration, Professional Learning Communities, Thinking, Technology, and Leadership...
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Preetha Ram - Rethinking Educational Assessment Using Crowd Sourcing

PREETHA RAM Dr. Preetha Ram is a social entrepreneur, CoFounder and Chief Learning Officer of OpenStudy and Associate Dean at Emory University. She holds degrees from Yale (PhD), Emory (MBA) and IIT Delhi.
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Crowdsourcing in Higher Education | Inside Online Schools

Crowdsourcing in Higher Education | Inside Online Schools | Crowdsourcing in Education | Scoop.it
It was anticipated to “significantly change the way teachers, students and parents approach learning, and provide a powerful opportunity to link technology and the Web to the classroom.” Now in 2012 recent Faculty Matters ...
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