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Multiplying Fractions with Flair | For The Love of Teaching Math

Multiplying Fractions with Flair | For The Love of Teaching Math | Content- Fractions | Scoop.it
Kay Clarke's insight:

This is amazing!  Like I said, I looked ahead in the curriculum to see how we would have to teach multiplying fracitons.  The way the curriculum is written, it made NO sense to me.  When I read that we would be multiplying fractions by making arrays, I was so lost.  However, once I stumbled upon this, I got it right away.  The way this is broken down was really helpful to me as a teacher.  It's been a struggle to try to figure out exactly how the county wants us to be teaching math, but this really broke it down for me and made it easy to understand.  I definitely plan on holding onto this for MP4 when we get to this, and to show my team.  After looking through this whole website, it looks like this person has gone through the curriculum and written it in easire language and actually provided visuals for what we should be doing.  Great find.

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Free Common Core Math Lesson on Fractions - Educational Technology Tips

Free Common Core Math Lesson on Fractions - Educational Technology Tips | Content- Fractions | Scoop.it
  Preparing students for modifying cooking recipes using fraction bars. Equivalent Fractions in a Common Core Lesson This is an introductory lesson to equivalent fractions.  Best of all, it is free to subscribers of EdTechTips newsletter.
Kay Clarke's insight:

Looking ahead in the curriculum I know that we come back to fractions at the end of the year and teach how to multiply fractions.  I really like this site becuase it breaks it down into more of a word problem than a smply equation.  I also like how it relates it back to the number line/fraction strips that my kdis will be familiar with.  In this example, the fraction strips are set up exactly like how they were when they were adding and subtracting fractions.  I think this familiarity will be important when teaching them how to multiply fractions because it sort of feeds off of addition and subtraction and a strong mastery of that will help with multiplication.  This site in general also lokos great-it is all linked to the CCSS which is obviously what Curriculum 2.0 is based off of.

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Adding fractions. The Macarena Method! | Great Maths Teaching Ideas

Adding fractions. The Macarena Method! | Great Maths Teaching Ideas | Content- Fractions | Scoop.it
Kay Clarke's insight:

This is AMAZING!  I saw this from Kristinia-Maria's content page also on fractions and knew I needed to check this out myself.  Fractions are a really big deal in fifth grade and Curriculum 2.0 has a really different way of teaching addition and subtration of fractions.  It calls for three weeks, without ever simply teaching them to find the LCD and then add.  We used pattern blocks, Cuisinare Rods, number lines, and fraction strips before even mentioning changing the denominator.  This trick seems like a really fun end of the "unit".  My kids have such a deep understanding of WHY they need to change the denominator and what is really happening to the fractions when all the numbers change, but in life there won't always be pattern blocks or number lines handy to do this math.  And while yes, we eventually do teach them to find the LCD and find equivalent fractions, this little trick could just be the reminder that 1, or 2 or 5 or all of my kids need to FINALLY get it to click.  This is something that I would not teach until I knew my kids had mastered it first, and I would not teach this as a lesson.  Just as a cool, fun tip they could chose to use if they wanted.  I love it!!!

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Common Core Video Series: Fraction Fluency in Grade 5 | EngageNY

Common Core Video Series: Fraction Fluency in Grade 5 | EngageNY | Content- Fractions | Scoop.it
Kay Clarke's insight:

In my class, we play "Math Ball" in the ten minutes after math is over and students who are not in our homeroom go back to theirs, and some of our students come back from their math classes.  The way it works is basically everyone stands in a circle and Mr.Walker or I picks a number, like 7, and then throws it to a student who then has to say the next multiple of 7.  We do this because the kids love it, but also to work on their math facts.  I saw this video and thought this could be a new variation,  Math Ball: Fraction Edition.  I thought it could be relaly fun to play this where whoever has the ball says the first fraction, and then throws it.  That next person would say the fraction that would make it equal to a whole, then throws it to a new person and so on and so on.  Like regular math ball, this isn't particularly challenging, but it's something the kids will LOVE and beg to do, a way to check for understanding, but also a way to get math involved in a fun way.

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Using a Number Line to Teach Fractions

Using a Number Line to Teach Fractions | Content- Fractions | Scoop.it
Teachers in this multimedia presentation from Doing What Works demonstrate the use of a double-scaled, open number line to teach fractions to upper elementary students.
Kay Clarke's insight:

This video was really interesting to me because of the work with fractions we've already done.  While we've used number lines to add and subtract fractions, this way was slightly different than how Curriculum 2.0 says to do it.  This uses a double number line, so the whole numbers are on the bottom and the fractions run along the top.  I really like this method of addinf and subtracting fractions .  I like how it develops their understanding of equivalent fractions, but I really like how it encourages students to use what they know about multiples to label their number line.  Having good number sense seems to be important with this strategy because students need to be able to translate what the whole number equivalent would be to the fraction. For example, with 1/4 + 1/5, students labeled it from 0-20, and knew that there are 5 groups of 4 in 20 and 4 groups of 5 in 20, thus giving them the numbers they would need to add together. (the numerator). Slightly confusing-but I think 5th graders in a few years will really grab onto this after having the CCSS since kindergarden.

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