Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History
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What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage

What The 2012 Election Would Have Looked Like Without Universal Suffrage | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
These five maps look at how the 2012 election would have played out before everyone could vote.
Bradley McClure's insight:

The attached images show what the election of 2012 would have looked like without certain people groups being allowed to vote. Similar to the conversation regarding womens suffrage, this has the potential to be a dangerous topic, but it certainly can insight a real life reason for critical thinking. These images combine history with the present in a clear way that students can see and appreciate. The result could be a strong showing of critical thinking in a US history classroom.

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Teacher Planning Doesn't Have To Stifle Creativity In Schools

Teacher Planning Doesn't Have To Stifle Creativity In Schools | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
Teacher Planning Doesn't Have To Stifle Creativity In Schools
Bradley McClure's insight:

This article seeks to establish a few guidelines for promoting creativity in a classroom, and I would argue that the same principles apply for producing a classroom full of critical thinking. The premise is that there must be some amount of structure in a lesson plan to promote creativity. It does not easily happen on its own, so creating a framework for creativity (and critical thinking) can allow students to have direction without a set plan of what their final project must look like. The article uses the example of a Haiku, which has structure, but is still full of creative ability.

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Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural Address, 03/04/1933

Bradley McClure's insight:

This inagural address was one of the pivitol moments in United States history. In a US history class, analyzing such speech would be a wonderful means to promote critical thinking in a classroom. The entirety of the speech, presented as FDR would have read it, is an opportunity for students to experience history. One idea would be to have the students work in groups of 2-4 to answer a set of questions that the teacher provides. A second idea would be have students read this after having a discussion about the beginning of the great depression, think critically about what the speech is actually saying in small groups, and then have each individual write what they think a US citizen would have thought about the speech in 1933. Multiple opportunities for facilitating critical thinking exist within this primary document.

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The 7 Skills Students Must Have For The Future

The 7 Skills Students Must Have For The Future | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
A powerful talk by Tony Wagner attempts to uncover the 7 skills students must have in order to prepared for the future.
The post The 7 Skills Students Must Have For The Future appeared first on Edudemic.

Via Charles Fischer
Bradley McClure's insight:

Tony Wagner's book, "Creating Innovators" has strongly influenced what I know about teaching and why it is important that we understand how the world is changing. The seven skills that he mentions includes critical thinking and problem solving, along with six other vaulable skills. It would be a shame for us as teachers to perpetuate teaching without putting these seven skills at the core of our purpose. Critical thinking and Problem solving are connected to the other seven, particularly in light of the new P21 Framework that is beginning to take off in the world of education. 

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Charles Fischer's curator insight, July 8, 2013 8:11 AM

All seven of these skills can be practiced through Socratic Seminar. The first, critical thinking and problem-solving can be achieved through a combination of a quality text and provocative questions. The second, collaboration across networks and leading by influence, can be achieved by incorporating technology. The third, agility and adaptability, starts with listening carefully to others and appreciating other viewpoints. The fourth, initiative and entrepreneurialism, begins with being brave enough to speak your mind in front of a group of peers. The fifth, effective oral and written communication, is developed through deepening one's understandings through dialogue. The sixth, accessing and analyzing information, can be practiced through weighing evidence and citing sources. And the last, curiosity and imagination, can be fostered by students learning to ask their own questions.

Ruben Bravo's curator insight, July 13, 2013 1:35 PM

To build the furutre we want for our family and  for our communities we need to begin investing in the right mix of skills that will steer us through the path of development.

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Creativity on demand! | Smoke and Mirrors

Creativity on demand! | Smoke and Mirrors | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
http://t.co/9DKyvASIny
#creativity #education #gedivt
Bradley McClure's insight:

Pardon the language found here, but I believe this cartoon sums up a few of the problems that we as an education system have. There is a trend towards promoting creativity and excitement in the classroom, yet we maintain many of the same structures that have existed to assimilate creativity into streamlined production. A paradigm shift, a mindset change, and a move from the current equilibrium must happen. Critical thinking and problem solving are great aspirations, but they are invalidated by the status quo of how we teach. My final thought: we should change how we teach, not what we teach. 

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Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation

Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Dr. Allen Mendler presents eight strategies for helping your students reclaim and master the lost art of conversation.

Via Charles Fischer
Bradley McClure's insight:

The importance of a constructive conversation is the focus of this article. There are many ideas mentioned within that all trend toward creating a classroom environment that is based on constant critical thinking. There are eight clear suggestions layed out here meant to assist teachers promote this conversation. One of them includes S.L.A.N.T. as a technique to promote physical cues, so props to Lemov! My favorite is one that says "Put Thinking Ahead of Knowing." How incredible would a class be if the students were focused on thinking instead of simply trying to achieve a specific knowledge goal? I'd wager it would look revolutionary.

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Charles Fischer's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:13 AM

I have found that genuine, open-ended questions are the best for generating conversation. Students must first be taught how to askuseful questions, however.

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Women's Suffrage: Crash Course US History #31

You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is ni...
Bradley McClure's insight:

John Green for the win again. This video quickly goes through the history of womens sufferage, which is highly beneficial for its historical content, but for the purpose of this curration, it brings up a plethora of topics that can be helpful for promoting critical thinking, and even highlighting a problem that still exists today. At the root of this clip, a truth is proclaimed: the equality of women. This can spark much conversation, thought, creativity, and even address a problem that still can be seen today, at least by some peoples standards. Admittedly, this is a touchy subject, but critical thinking and problem solving skills should often walk a line that stretches students. Using this video as a starting point, a labratory of historical/social discussion can be established.

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Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers

Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
Why Questions Are More Important Than Answers
Bradley McClure's insight:

This article addresses one of the most important aspects of critical thinking and problem solving: asking questions. It is a short presentation of a conceptual framework that teachers should understand. Asking questions is an important and valuable aspect of a US history classroom, but more importantly, having the students be in a place to ask questions themselves is ideal. One point the article makes is that a bad question usually leads to a quick end of a discussion. In a class where critical thinking is being promoted, conversations and thinking does not stop with one answer. 

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IJTLHE55.pdf

Bradley McClure's insight:
Contained in this article is an easy to understand graphic representation of how to teach students critical thinking. It is a five step process that includes: 1. Determine Learning Objectives 2.Teach through questioning 3. Practice before you assess 4. Review, refine, and improve 5. Provide feedback and assessment of learning. These steps are connected in a cyclical manner, for there is no achievement of "critical thinker," rather it is a constant improvement of a particular skill. Each step is connected to Bloom's taxonomy, and can be utilized at a multitude of conceptual levels. Applying these skills are not limited to one subject.
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Who is the worst civil liberties president in US history?

Who is the worst civil liberties president in US history? | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
Glenn Greenwald: Where do the abuses of the last decade from Bush and Obama rank when compared to prior assaults in the name of war?
Bradley McClure's insight:

While this article does not completely answer it's own question, it does pose an interesting topic that fits wonderfully within the confines of a critical thinking style lesson. Posing a question such as this requires a few preceeding questions: What are civil liberties? How can they be violated? What have Presidents done to limit civil liberties? This would be a wonderful summative assessment at the end of the year, but could also be used to compare two or three presidents from a certain time period, or even from dramatically different times. Imagine discussing Woodrow Wilson with President Obama. Or George Bush Sr. with Grover Clevland? History is linear in many respects, but to limit it to lines is a geometrical fallacy. Instead we should promote a three dimensional conversation that takes points off of the line and constructs a new shape.

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29 Awesome Pictures Of The US Navy Through History

29 Awesome Pictures Of The US Navy Through History | Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in US History | Scoop.it
October 27 is Navy Day in the United States...
Bradley McClure's insight:

Using images can be an effective way to analyze and discuss history and how time has changed something like the US Navy. Utilizing these primary resources has many potential uses in the classroom. You could look at the change over time of all twenty-nine of the pictures; focus on two or three of the pictures and discuss what could be going on; comparing a few pictures to see what has changed, as well as what seems the same. Pictures contain stories, and in a US History classroom, they can promote critical thinking to create the 1,000 words all images have.

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The Industrial Economy: Crash Course US History #23

In which John Green teaches you about the Industrial Economy that arose in the United States after the Civil War. You know how when you're studying history, ...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Bradley McClure's insight:

This video is one of many that may show up on this site from John Green's series known as "hyper history." He and his team go through and quickly hit on many of the points that prompted the American Industrial Revolution. This would could be a great video to either use as a flipped lesson assignment, or even something to show in class. One of the pitfalls is how incredibly quick he moves from subject to subject. This makes the video entertaining, but could leave some behind. There are many points that he brings up that can be used for engaging critical discussion.

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