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‘Get out!’: Lt General rains hell on Air Force Academy after racist messages were left on black cadets’ rooms

‘Get out!’: Lt General rains hell on Air Force Academy after racist messages were left on black cadets’ rooms | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Lt. Gen. Jay B. Silveria, superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy, addressed cadets on Thursday in a powerful speech about treating one another with “dignity and respect” after racial slurs were written outside five black cadet candidates’ dorm rooms.

One message—which was posted on Facebook by a young cadet candidate’s mom—read, “go home n**ger.”

“There is absolutely no place in our Air Force for racism,” Silveria told the Air Force Times, adding, “I‘ve said it before: the area of dignity and respect is my red line. Let me be clear, it won’t be crossed without significant repercussions.”

And clear he was. In a speech Silveria gave to Air Force cadets Thursday, the general addressed the incident head-on; during the roughly 5-minute lecture, the superintendent resoundingly denounced racism, and demonstrated the kind of moral clarity one would expect from a leader.

“If you’re outraged by those words, then you’re in the right place,” Silveria said of the racist graffiti. ”That kind of behavior has no place at the prep school, it has no place at USAFA and it has no place in the United States Air Force.”

“You should be outraged not only as an airman, but as a human being,” he added.

Silveria noted the incident occurred in the context of fraught racial tensions in the United States as a whole. “We would be naive to think we shouldn’t discuss this topic,” he said. “We’d also be tone deaf not to think about the backdrop of what’s going on in our country. Things like Charlottesville and Ferguson, the protests in the NFL.”

“What we should have is a civil discourse, and talk about these issues,” Silveria suggested. “That’s a better idea.”

“I also have a better idea, and it’s about our diversity,” he continued. “And it’s the power of the diversity … the power of us as a diverse group. The power that we come from all walks of life, that we come from all parts of this county, that we come from all races, all backgrounds, gender, all makeup, all upbringings. The power of that diversity comes together and makes us that much more powerful.”

“We have an opportunity here to think about what we are as an institution,” Silveria said. “This is our institution and no one can take away our values. No one can write on a board and question our values. No one can take that away from us.”

He called upon his cadets to find the “moral courage” to stand up for those values.

“So just in case you’re unclear on where I stand on this topic, I’m going to leave you with my most important thought today,” he said. “If you can’t treat someone with dignity and respect, then you need to get out. If you can’t treat someone from another gender, whether that’s a man or a woman, with dignity and respect, then you need to get out. If you demean someone in any way, then you need to get out. And if you can’t treat someone from another race, or a different color of skin, with dignity and respect, then you need to get out.”

“If you can’t treat someone with dignity and respect, then get out,” Silveria repeated.
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The 3 Qualities That Make a Good Dean: readiness, good temperament, sense of purpose

The 3 Qualities That Make a Good Dean: readiness, good temperament, sense of purpose | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"A veteran professor-turned-dean who wanted to bring light to "the dark side" explains what worked for him."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday January 18, 2017


"Good deans must have readiness, good temperament, sense of purpose In a recent Chronicle of Higher Education article, Robert Bruner describes the three qualities that make for a good dean: readiness, temperament, and purpose. In discussing readiness, Bruner highlights the importance of having accumulated leadership experience, stating that “the best deans are wise in the world, as well as ethical and effective.” Of temperament, he notes that the role does not require the dean to be a genius, but a dean must have “high self-confidence, resilience to failure, humility, and a bias for action.” Of purpose, Bruner writes that deans must feel driven by the institutional mission and values, a desire to serve stakeholders, belief in the students that will graduate from the institution, and their own capacity to bring something to the situation."

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5 Ways to Become a Better Leader! #1 liked blog

5 Ways to Become a Better Leader! #1 liked blog | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
It’s an age-old question: Are we influenced more by nature or nurture? Applied to leadership, the question becomes: Are great leaders born or made? It’s one of the most frequently asked questions in leadership development.

Let’s start with the definition of “leader.” My good friend and mentor, Dr. Paul Hersey, defined leadership as “working with and through others to achieve objectives.” Given this definition, anyone in a position whose achievement requires support from others can play the role of a leader. I love this definition because it supports the philosophy of “leadership at all levels,” which is so critical in today’s world of knowledge workers.
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Successful Companies Don’t Adapt, They Prepare by Greg Satell in Harvard Business Review

In 1960, Harvard professor Theodore Levitt published a landmark paper in Harvard Business Review that urged executives to adapt by asking themselves, “What business are we really in?” He offered the both the railroad companies and Hollywood studios as examples of industries that failed to adapt because they defined their business incorrectly.

Yet today, the railroads don’t seem to be doing too badly. Union Pacific, the leading railroad company has a market capitalization of over $80 billion, about 60% more than Ford or GM. Disney, the leading movie studio company, has a market capitalization of about $150 billion. That doesn’t seem too shabby either.

While nimble startups chasing the next trend are exciting, the truth is that companies rarely succeed by adapting to market events. Rather, successful firms prevail by shaping the future. That can’t be done through agility alone, but takes years of preparation to achieve. The truth is that once you find yourself in a position where you need to adapt, it’s usually too late.
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Academic Leadership: Advice for New Administrators

Academic Leadership: Advice for New Administrators | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Don’t be afraid to admit when you’re wrong, and other lessons for newcomers to administration."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, August 18, 2016:


"“What I wish I’d known”: CV contributor provides advice for new administrators Reflecting on her experiences with transitioning into an administrative role at a US college, Elizabeth Lehfeldt gives the advice that she wishes she had received when she first entered into her new role. Lehfeldt recommends building a network of go-to people for questions or concerns, working to avoid the more isolated work atmosphere of administration after having a faculty role, and being willing to acknowledge mistakes. The author also discusses the importance of capabilities such as delegating tasks, identifying what you need to do your job better, and knowing what constitutes a true emergency, in order to keep a healthy work balance."

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5 Things Collaborative Strategic Planning Isn't

5 Things Collaborative Strategic Planning Isn't | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Collaborative planning implies a process that goes beyond the board room to include individuals throughout the organization in meaningful ways to provide insights and input to shape organizational strategy.

Admittedly, collaborative planning processes aren’t all that common.

In fact, it may be relatively rare.

Because of that rarity, we run into potential clients with serious apprehensions about opening the door wide to have employees throughout the organization share strategic ideas. That leads to a variety of misperceptions.
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Advice to a white professor about mentoring scholars of color (essay)

Advice to a white professor about mentoring scholars of color (essay) | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
You don’t need to be a person of color to mentor a colleague of color, writes Kerry Ann Rockquemore, but you do need to rethink what it means to be a mentor.
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5 Ways to Develop Emotionally Intelligent Behaviors

5 Ways to Develop Emotionally Intelligent Behaviors | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Effective leaders are emotionally intelligent. They have the skills to manage and use their emotions. And, like all leadership skills, emotional skills – the attitude and abilities with which someone approaches life and work – can be learned and developed. Brain science shows us how that learning occurs.
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The Power of Story in School Transformation

The Power of Story in School Transformation | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Educators should pay close attention to their students' and colleagues' stories and, through "storientation," use these shared feelings and expectations to create desired outcomes.
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The Road Not Taken: Why I Started Calling BS in Meetings | LinkedIn

The Road Not Taken: Why I Started Calling BS in Meetings | LinkedIn | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

By Shane Atchison, influencer

CEO at POSSIBLE

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4 Things I Do That Make Me A Bad Manager

4 Things I Do That Make Me A Bad Manager | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Anyone who has been a leader of people; whether a manager or a president, has at some point not done it particularly well.I subscribe to the "3 Kinds of Bad Manager" scenario.Bad Manager 1 has no

Via Stepped Leader, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 29, 2014 1:08 PM

The challenge with lists is they fall short. This one should have included listening and taking time to build relationships.

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Principal musings on education: The Six Secrets of Change

Principal musings on education: The Six Secrets of Change | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

How do Fullan’s Six Secrets of Change fit into your evolving role as a Digital Leader? If you are about to make this transition how do you see them impacting you and your work? I always learn so much from Fullan.


Via Patti Kinney, Tessie Uranga-MSEd., Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 10, 2014 1:21 PM

There are some good points in the article by Eric Sheninger. Teaching is a calling which suggests integrating passion and compassion. The key point the author makes is we need to think about what we are reading and, more importantly, have conversations with others and our self around what we are reading. It is what is often missed in the writings of the Dufours and Eaker and Michael Fullan. Another key point is do we just take what "experts" who are not in the classroom say as a given. Providing teachers with opportunities to express their voice, share their experiences, and play key policy roles is critical in education if we wish to move away from School.

 

The article is OK, but I always wonder if I could just dilute my life to six secrets, seven habits, and other recipes how wonderful it would be.

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If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists?

If Humble People Make the Best Leaders, Why Do We Fall for Charismatic Narcissists? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Human beings hunger for superheroes."


""The research is clear: when we choose humble, unassuming people as our leaders, the world around us becomes a better place. 


Humble leaders improve the performance of a company in the long run because they create more collaborative environments. They have a balanced view of themselves – both their virtues and shortcomings – and a strong appreciation of others’ strengths and contributions, while being open to new ideas and feedback. 


These “unsung heroes” help their believers to build their self-esteem, go beyond their expectations, and create a community that channels individual efforts into an organized group that works for the good of the collective."


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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, April 16, 2017 4:29 AM

By Margariate Mayo. It sounds hopeless. But in the end we get the leaders we deserve.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, September 26, 2017 2:32 PM
Are narcissists really leading? Perhaps they are bullying, manipulating, coercing, etc. How we choose leaders, if that is what we want to call them, speaks volumes about what we value as people.
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How to reduce stress as a department chair? Practice self-compassion

How to reduce stress as a department chair? Practice self-compassion | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"As a department chair, screwups are inevitable, writes Professor Plainspoken. The key is finding ways to avoid beating yourself up about them."


Summary from Academica Top Ten: Monday January 16, 2017"


"Department chairs must learn to be patient with selves to avoid stress 


“Somewhere along the way, I got the idea that being kind and patient with myself was self-indulgent. I am unlearning this now,” writes Professor Plainspoken on the ways to avoid stress as a department chair. 


Reflecting on previous stressful experiences with paperwork, teaching schedules, and room assignments, as well as the maxim that “the best way to reduce stress is to stop screwing up,” the author explains that learning to let mistakes go and forgiving yourself are the best ways to reduce stress in these situations. 


The author concludes with the suggestion that, “should you become chair, you cannot afford not to be kind and patient with yourself.”"

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Three tips for managing faculty curmudgeons who find your administrative buzzwords insufferable

Three tips for managing faculty curmudgeons who find your administrative buzzwords insufferable | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

How to approach faculty members who find your administrative buzzwords insufferable.


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday, October 26, 2016:


"How to manage a faculty “curmudgeon” 


“I am a proud curmudgeon. Whatever hip new thing you’re promoting, I’m probably uninterested,” writes Alex Small for the Chronicle of Higher Education. 


Small adds, however, that he has worked hard during his career to support the governance of his department, even when it means clearing bureaucratic hurdles and working new buzzwords into lengthy reports. 


To this end, Small offers three tips for soliciting strong service contributions from faculty curmudgeons: 


1. ensure that the stakes of an initiative are real and meaningful to those asked to support it, 


2. do not change the rules or goals of an initiative without clear warning, and finally, 


3. do not try to win a curmudgeon over to the administrator’s point of view. "

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A Son of the White Working Class on What Trump’s Followers See in Him

A Son of the White Working Class on What Trump’s Followers See in Him | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

There are certainly people out there who don’t like the sense that they’re falling behind while racial minorities—or that people who don’t look or act like them—are getting ahead. But I don’t think that’s the majority attitude. 


I think that there’s obviously a certain amount of bidirectionality to this. What I mean is that people will follow political leadership. People listen to what their political leaders are telling them, and my view is both that Trump is tapping into some racially ugly attitudes, but also that he is leading people to racially ugly attitudes. 


I don’t think that 60-70 percent of working-class white voters would have supported a Muslim ban before Donald Trump said something about a Muslim ban. I think that all you have to do is go back to the most recent Republican president and the way that George W. Bush encouraged us to think openly and supportively about our Muslim citizens. 


There is an element here where I think it’s not just that Trump is exploiting something but he’s also leading the white working class to a very dark place.

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They Don’t Train Us for This

They Don’t Train Us for This | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Thirteen lessons I wish someone had taught me before I became an academic administrator."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, August 4, 2016:


"Administrator reflects on the lessons learned in management In a reflection on his own experiences in a first management post, Fred Schwarzbach of the Chronicle of Higher Education discusses 13 management lessons that he learned “the hard way.” These lessons include learning how to listen after a career as a professor, avoiding snap decisions, bringing solutions to supervisors instead of problems, and remembering that it is the students that all of management have in common. Schwarzbach concludes that one of the most important things is to ensure that you take the time for a hobby or life outside the office: “Your primary job, in fact, is to stay sane enough to respond to the madness on your desk.”"

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The Top 5 Faculty Morale Killers

The Top 5 Faculty Morale Killers | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"A good midlevel manager can make all the difference in determining whether faculty life is satisfying or unbearable."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday, April 27, 2016


"Prof-turned-admin lists top five ways to kill faculty morale “I know firsthand how department chairs can make faculty lives easier,” writes Rob Jenkins for the Chronicle of Higher Education, “and I also know what they do (all too often) that makes faculty lives more difficult.” Jenkins highlights a set of five “faculty morale killers” that mid-level academic managers are often guilty of: micromanagement, trust issues, hogging the spotlight, assigning blame, and blatant careerism. The author concludes that instead of falling into these common traps, “effective leaders try to create a workplace where people are comfortable and fulfilled, where they feel valued and believe what they’re doing has meaning.”"

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Things I Wish My Department Chair Would Say about Teaching

Things I Wish My Department Chair Would Say about Teaching | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
We need to be having more substantive conversations about teaching and learning in our department meetings. Here are a few things I'd like to hear.
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5 Ego Traits Which Destroy Team-Working

5 Ego Traits Which Destroy Team-Working | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
To create great team-working, you need to leave your ego at home each day. People talk about the ego and mean many different things

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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JULIA AVENDAÑO's curator insight, August 11, 2015 9:36 AM

Estar dispuesto al éxito del equipo...dificil pero no imposible!

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Ten Stupid Rules That Drive Great Employees Away | LinkedIn

Ten Stupid Rules That Drive Great Employees Away | LinkedIn | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 19, 2014 11:57 AM

Plato probably did not envision a polis like what exists today, but policy is not about policing people externally. It is about negotiating the workplace norms. Biesta and Ranciere write about this in School.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Can Skipping a Meeting Make You a Better Leader?

Can Skipping a Meeting Make You a Better Leader? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
It’s not easy being a great leader. One of the marks of good leadership is the ability to look at problems in new ways, find creative solutions, and think outside-of-the-box in order to inspire
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