Criminology and Economic Theory
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How Police Are Checking for Pot DUIs

After nearly one month after the legalization of recreational marijuana in California, officials are still trying to determine the best way to enforce the law and keep dangerously stoned drivers off the road.
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Manisha Misra's comment, February 6, 6:38 PM
I think this is interesting because testing for THC is very different from testing for alcohol. And some people can be stoned out of their minds but still have decent driving skills, it's not like alcohol where your whole perception is completely off and you're swerving through the roads. I think with pot, it's more like you're trying too hard to focus on driving or you're going too slow. You're impaired in a completely different way, so it'll definitely be interesting to see how this all goes down.
Michael McColley's comment, February 12, 12:56 AM
I think what they need to do with this is come up with a legal limit just like they did with alcohol. I think this needs to be a legal limit for the country. and not just state by state. Also what they might be able to do is do a legal limit for age and weight and sex of the individual. Another option you might consider for this would be zero tolerance while operating a motor vehicle. I think that should be the same thing with alcohol as well as there are entirely too many drunk driver's out there. I know that it wouldn't solve all the issues with this, but it would sure help I think.
Rob Duke's comment, February 15, 2:40 PM
It would be great if they had a way to test limits, but cannabis metabolizes differently than does alcohol. It also attaches to different receptors. For the first difference, this means cannabis is still detectable in one's body for a week or more, which makes it difficult to show levels as having a causation for physical symptoms. For the second, cannabis attaches to brain receptors in locations other than the brain stem, which we don't yet completely understand. Until we more fully understand what happens, I suspect that we're going to go back to a more detailed set of Field Sobriety Tests where we will focus on showing objective evidence of impairment. The downside is that we'll see more judgement cases, which will likely mean more court time to sort out the "close" cases.
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After journalist vanishes, focus shifts to young prince’s ‘dark’ and bullying side - The

After journalist vanishes, focus shifts to young prince’s ‘dark’ and bullying side - The | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When he hosted last October’s glittering global investment conference in Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had the world at his fingertips. Thousands of investors, corporate chieftains and government leaders flocked to the kingdom to hear the charismatic young heir to the Saudi throne outline his plans for modernization of the reclusive kingdom, and to be invited along for the ride and the profits.

“Only dreamers are welcome to join,” Mohammed told his audience.  

As a second conference approaches this month in Riyadh, Mohammed, 33, seems far less dashing. Over the past week, many who had planned to attend have abruptly canceled, scrambling to distance themselves from what they now see as a runaway train headed for disaster.

Their distress stems from the still-unfolding story of Jamal Khashoggi, the self-exiled Saudi journalist allegedly killed and gruesomely dismembered this month by Saudi agents inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, after he dared to publicly criticize the crown prince and his government.
Rob Duke's insight:

I doubt this is about one Prince and more about the way the entire system works.

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German court orders extradition of suspect in Bulgarian journalist's killing

German court orders extradition of suspect in Bulgarian journalist's killing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A court in Germany has ordered the extradition of a Bulgarian man who was detained earlier this week on suspicion of the rape and murder of Bulgarian journalist Viktoriya Marinova.

The suspect was arrested in Stade, near the northern German city of Hamburg, on Tuesday.

According to a statement from the Higher Regional court in Celle, the man will be extradited within the next 10 days from Germany to Bulgaria.
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Jamal Khashoggi: Turkey has 'shocking' evidence of journalist's killing

Jamal Khashoggi: Turkey has 'shocking' evidence of journalist's killing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi may have recorded his own death, a Turkish newspaper reported Saturday morning.

Khashoggi turned on the recording function of his Apple Watch before walking into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2 , according to Sabah newspaper.
The moments of his "interrogation, torture and killing were audio recorded and sent to both his phone and to iCloud," the pro-government, privately owned newspaper paper reported. The Turkish newspaper said conversations of the men involved in the reported assassination were recorded.
Security forces leading the investigation found the audio file inside the phone Khasshoggi left with his fiancé, according to Sabah.
Upon noticing the watch, Sabah reports, Khashoggi's assailants tried to unlock the Apple Watch with multiple password attempts, ultimately using Khashoggi's fingerprint to unlock the smart watch. They were successful in deleting only some of the files, Sabah reported.

Rob Duke's insight:

This will give us some significant insight into how the state security apparatus of Saudi Arabia truly operates.

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Washington state abolishes death penalty

Washington state abolishes death penalty | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The north-western US state becomes the 20th to ban capital punishment following a court decision,
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The ex-Interpol chief's wife is taking on the Chinese Communist Party. Here's what it might mean

The ex-Interpol chief's wife is taking on the Chinese Communist Party. Here's what it might mean | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When now-former Interpol chief Meng Hongwei disappeared suddenly last month, his wife did something unexpected: She took up a public fight against the Beijing authorities, a move rarely seen from family members of accused senior Chinese officials.

Meng Hongwei, 64, vanished from public view after taking a flight from France to Beijing in late September. Interpol, the international police organization, said Sunday it had received a letter of resignation from Meng, who took the post in 2016.

On Monday, Beijing confirmed that Meng, who was also a vice minister of public security in China, is being detained for alleged corruption.

In a tearful Tuesday interview with CNN in Lyon, France -- where Interpol is headquartered -- Grace Meng said her husband is the victim of political "persecution," and voiced grave concern for his safety.

Echoing her earlier statements, she said she decided to challenge the mighty Chinese state and the ruling Communist Party for the sake of "all of China's children, all of China's wives and all of China's mommies and daddies."

They were powerful words, amid heart-wrenching emotions. Her interview had to be paused repeatedly as she broke down in tears talking about her husband and their young children. She was also receiving incessant calls during filming from people who she said were Chinese diplomats, demanding to meet her alone.

Grace Meng might appear to be an accidental hero, spontaneously reacting to the circumstances she was totally unprepared for.
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Woman arrested with daughter in Dubai over drinking wine is released | UK news | The Guardian

Woman arrested with daughter in Dubai over drinking wine is released | UK news | The Guardian | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A woman who was detained in Dubai with her four-year-old daughter after drinking a complimentary glass of wine on a flight from London has expressed her relief after she was cleared by authorities and allowed to return home.

Ellie Holman, a dentist originally from Sweden who lives in Sevenoaks, Kent, with her husband and three children, had been facing a year in detention while awaiting a court hearing after she was arrested on 13 July having drunk one glass of wine on her eight-hour Emirates flight to Dubai.

Holman said she was excited to return to England, but revealed the detention had cost her family tens of thousands of pounds and used up all of their savings.

Human rights group Detained in Dubai, which has been assisting Holman, 44, said authorities in the United Arab Emirates had decided not to pursue the charges. Holman is due to return to the UK on Sunday.

The dentist and her young daughter were initially denied access to a toilet, water and food while being held in a cell for three days, according to the human rights group
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China 'legalises' internment camps for million Uighurs | World news | The Guardian

China 'legalises' internment camps for million Uighurs | World news | The Guardian | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
China’s far north-western region of Xinjiang has retroactively legitimised the use of internment camps where up to one million Muslims are being held.

Amid sustained international criticism, Chinese authorities have revised legislation to allow the regional government to officially permit the use of “education and training centres” to incarcerate “people influenced by extremism”.

Chinese authorities deny that the internment camps exist but say petty criminals are sent to vocational “training centres”. Former detainees say they were forced to denounce Islam and profess loyalty to the Communist party in what they describe as political indoctrination camps.


‘We’re a people destroyed’: why Uighur Muslims across China are living in fear
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“It’s a retrospective justification for the mass detainment of Uighurs, Kazakhs and other Muslim minorities in Xinjiang,” said James Leibold, a scholar of Chinese ethnic policies at Melbourne’s La Trobe University. “It’s a new form of re-education that’s unprecedented and doesn’t really have a legal basis, and I see them scrambling to try to create a legal basis for this policy.”

The revisions, published on Tuesday, say government agencies at the county level and above “may establish occupational skills education and training centres, education transformation organisations and management departments to transform people influenced by extremism through education”.

A new clause directs the centres to teach the Mandarin language and provide occupational and legal education, as well as “ideological education, psychological rehabilitation and behaviour correction”. Another new clause bars “refusing public goods like radio and television.” Chinese state media often feature programs hailing development in Xinjiang and promoting the government’s vision of stability in the territory.

The revised rules include a ban on behaviour “undermining the implementation” of China’s family planning policies which restrict family size. Last year, authorities ended an exception that had allowed Uighur and other ethnic minorities to have more children than their Han Chinese counterparts.


'My soul, where are you?': families of Muslims missing in China meet wall of silence
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“Overall, this clearly strengthens the legal basis for the type of re-education that has essentially been admitted by the state … indicating that the state is determined to proceed with the current campaign,” said Adrian Zenz, a researcher who focuses on Xinjiang.

The original legislation announced in 2017 banned the wearing of veils, “extreme speech and behaviour” and the refusal to listen to public radio and television broadcasts.

Beijing has spent decades trying to suppress pro-independence sentiment in Xinjiang fuelled in part by frustration about an influx of migrants from China’s Han majority. Authorities say extremists there have ties to foreign terror groups but have given little evidence to support the claim.

Members of Uighur, Kazakh and other Muslim minorities who live abroad say they have not been able to contact relatives in China, while authorities are placing children separated from their detained or exiled parents into dozens of state-run orphanages across Xinjiang.

Leibold said the revisions were an attempt to deflect international criticism. China has come under increasing pressure from the US and the European Union after a United Nations panel confronted Chinese diplomats in August over reports of arbitrary mass detentions and harsh security measures aimed at Muslims. China is up for review by the UN’s human rights council in November.

“Regardless of these revisions I still believe the practice of coercively detaining Uighurs and other Muslim minorities in Xinjiang in ‘education through transformation centres’ not only violates Chinese law but also international legal norms against the extrajudicial deprivation of liberty,” Leibold said.

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Kentucky inmates who escaped in trash cans captured

Kentucky inmates who escaped in trash cans captured | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Justin Stumler and Jeremy Hunt were arrested within hours of one another on Monday after their escape from the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections.
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Christa Lynch's comment, October 14, 6:07 PM
I think my favorite part is one had already been previously charged with escaping in 2005. How would or how did he qualify minimum security anything? I do appreciate the creative quick thinking. I would think that if these guys getting kitchen duty was so easy, along with their escape, the facility would rethink their procedures.
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Arrest over brutal murder of journalist in Bulgaria | Euronews

Arrest over brutal murder of journalist in Bulgaria | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Bulgarian police have arrested a man as part of an investigation into the murder of Bulgarian television reporter Viktoria Marinova, whose body was found in the town of Ruse after she reported on possible government corruption.

"We have in custody a person whose alibi we are checking, but for the time being we do not have a concrete suspect. Work with him is continuing," the head of Danube regional police in Ruse, Teodor Atanasov, told reporters.

Prosecutors opened an investigation into the suspected misuse of European Unions funds on Monday, while police investigate Marinova's rape and murder. Her body was found on Saturday dumped in the Danube river.

Marinova, 30, hosted a TV show that featured two investigative journalists who were detained for their work on suspected fraud involving EU funds.

So far no link has been established between her work and her murder, although colleagues have suggested a cover-up may be taking place.
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Spain acquits doctor found guilty in 'stealing babies' case | Euronews

Spain acquits doctor found guilty in 'stealing babies' case | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Spanish doctor accused of stealing and selling a baby girl has been found guilty of all charges but will not be punished due to statute of limitations. A victim of the "stolen-babies" programme said verdict leaves a "bittersweet taste".
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Interpol President Resigns Amid Chinese Corruption Investigation

Interpol President Resigns Amid Chinese Corruption Investigation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LYON, France (AP) — The wife of Interpol’s president made an impassioned plea Sunday for help in bringing her missing husband to safety, saying she thinks he sent an image of a knife before he disappeared in China as a way to warn her he was in danger.

Grace Meng detailed the last messages she exchanged with her husband, Interpol President Meng Hongwei, to reporters as part of her unusual appeal. Meng is China’s vice minister for public security, and regularly traveled between Beijing and Lyon, France, where Interpol is based.

His wife’s plea underscored how China’s system of shady and often-arbitrary detentions can ensnare even a senior public security official with international standing, leaving loved ones uninformed and in a panic.

In news that could confirm her fears: China announced less than an hour after she spoke Sunday that Meng was under investigation on suspicion of unspecified legal violations, making him the latest high-ranking official to fall victim to a sweeping crackdown by the ruling Communist Party.

Interpol then announced that Meng had resigned as president, effective immediately. It did not say why, or provide details about Meng’s whereabouts or condition. He was elected to lead the international police agency in 2016 and his term was not set to end until 2020.
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Why so many Dutch people work part time - The Economist explains

Why so many Dutch people work part time - The Economist explains | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

THE Dutch are generally a pretty content bunch. The Netherlands consistently ranks as one of the best places in the world to live. Dutch kids are among the happiest in the world, according to Unicef. Some attribute their high quality of life and general good nature to a laid-back approach to work: more than half of the Dutch working population works part time, a far greater share than in any other rich-world country. On average only a fifth of the working-age population in EU member states holds a part-time job (8.7% of men and 32.2% of women); in the Netherlands 26.8% of men and 76.6% of women work less than 36 hours a week. Why? 

Part of the reason is that Dutch women were relative latecomers to the labour market. Compared with other countries, few men had to leave to fight in the world wars of the 20th century, with the result that women did not labour in factories as they did in the US and Britain. Thanks to the country's wealth, a dual income was not a necessity for a comfortable life. And Dutch politics was dominated by Christian values until the 1980s: the focus was mainly on providing state aid (implicit subsidies in the fiscal system) so that women could stay at home with children.

This changed in the late 1980s, when the state realised that it would be a good idea to mobilise women into the workforce. But the cultural conviction that families still needed mothers to be home for tea-time prevailed, so the state worked closely with employers to ensure that the new part-time jobs would enjoy similar legal status to their full-time equivalents. This has, to an extent, continued: in 2000 the right for women and men to ask for a job to be part-time was written into law. But Ronald Dekker, a labour economist at Tilburg University, thinks this law is a confirmation of existing practice and therefore largely symbolic, only necessary for certain “archaic industries”. Instead, he reckons, the high prevalence of part-time jobs is largely down to the wide availability of good quality, well-paid “first tier” part-time jobs in the Netherlands: jobs often considered inferior in many other countries.

Whether part-time work is good for emancipation is questionable. Today, perhaps because part-time work is the norm, women in the Netherlands have a relatively high labour-force participation rate. But the Netherlands’ record for getting women into top management roles is dire. The prevalence of part-time work seems to play a role: once you strip out part-timers, women make it into management roles nearly as often as men, according to the CBS (the main statistics agency in the Netherlands) although that doesn't include top management. The Dutch government has said that 30% of executive board positions should be held by women, but that may prove excessively optimistic; the level in 2015 was just 6%, according to Mijntje Luckerath, an academic at Tilburg University, who blames old-fashioned selection processes. And not all part-timers are pleased with their situation: before the financial crisis, fewer than 10% of Dutch part-timers wished they were employed full time; this has since risen to nearly 25%. That percentage is still much lower than in other EU countries, but it is a striking rise.

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Interpol president reported missing after travelling to China according to French official | Euronews

Interpol president reported missing after travelling to China according to French official | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
French police have opened an investigation into the whereabouts of the president of international police cooperation agency Interpol, after his wife reported he had gone missing after travelling home to his native China last week.

The French judicial official, who spoke on condition of anonymity due to an ongoing investigation, said Meng Hongwei’s wife reported him missing on Friday.

The official said the Interpol chief left Lyon, France, where the international police organisation is based, and arrived in China at the end of September. She said there had been no news of him since.

Interpol has sent a statement to Euronews.

"Interpol is aware of media reports in connection with the alleged disappearance of INTERPOL President Meng Hongwei. This is a matter for the relevant authorities in both France and China. The Secretary-General is the Organization’s full-time official responsible for the day to day running of Interpol. Interpol’s General Secretariat headquarters will not comment further."

The 64-year-old Meng Hongwei was elected president of Interpol in November 2016. His term is due to run until 2020.

A vice minister of public security in China, he previously served as vice chairman of the national narcotics control commission and director of the National Counter-Terrorism Office for China.

Meng’s appointment at Interpol raised concerns among human rights campaigners who said China has a track record of marrying politics and policing. East and South East Asia Regional Director for Amnesty International, Nicholas Bequelin, was one such voice.
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THAILAND: Prime Suspect in $24 Million Bitcoin Scam Arrested

THAILAND: Prime Suspect in $24 Million Bitcoin Scam Arrested | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The main suspect in a Bitcoin fraud case in Thailand was detained at a Bangkok airport after being on the lam for 2 months.

Via Andre JACQUEMET - @globalBPA
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Pope defrocks two Chilean bishops over sexual abuse allegations

Pope defrocks two Chilean bishops over sexual abuse allegations | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Pope Francis has defrocked two Chilean bishops who have been caught up in the country's widening sexual abuse crisis, the Vatican said on Saturday.

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Can You Be Found Through DNA, Like the Alleged Golden State Killer?

Can You Be Found Through DNA, Like the Alleged Golden State Killer? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Even people who have never taken a genetic test can be tracked down like the Golden State Killer suspect.
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Christa Lynch's comment, October 14, 6:21 PM
I just watched a case from the 90’s of the rape and murder of this young lady on 20/20 and it was about this same thing as this article. This young lady’s murder went unsolved until genealogical DNA was used. It is amazing and alarming all at the same time. I feel like certain things are private which is why we have warrants. I am interested to see how this changes things, including the law.
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A note in a Walmart purse from a prisoner in China goes viral

A note in a Walmart purse from a prisoner in China goes viral | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When Christel Wallace found a piece of paper folded up at the bottom of her purse in March 2017, she threw it in the trash. She hadn’t yet used the maroon bag, made by Walmart and purchased from one of its Arizona stores months ago.

But after a few minutes, she got curious. She took the paper out of the wastebasket, unfolding the sheet to reveal a message scrawled in Mandarin Chinese.

Translated, it read: Inmates in China’s Yingshan Prison work 14 hours a day and are not allowed to rest at noon. We have to work overtime until midnight. People are beaten for not finishing their work. There’s no salt and oil in our meals. The boss pays 2,000 yuan every month for the prison to offer better food, but the food is all consumed by the prison guards. Sick inmates have to pay for their own pills. Prisons in China cannot be compared to prisons in the United States. Horse, cow, goat, pig, dog.

Christel’s daughter-in-law Laura Wallace posted a photo of the note to Facebook on April 23. The post first went viral locally, getting shared and liked several hundred times, mostly by fellow Arizonans. After a few days, local media outlets picked up the story; a week or so after that, dozens of mainstream publications like USA Today and HuffPost followed suit. One video report on the incident accumulated 2.9 million views.
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British woman arrested in Dubai after reporting rape | World news | The Guardian

British woman arrested in Dubai after reporting rape | World news | The Guardian | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A British woman who made a rape complaint in Dubai has been arrested for having illegal sex with her fiance, according to reports. The woman, a 23-year-old from London, said she was raped by a waiter in a luxury hotel after celebrating her engagement to her 44-year-old boyfriend, also from London.

But when she reported the alleged rape to police in the Middle Eastern state she and her boyfriend were arrested for having sex outside marriage and illegal drinking outside licensed premises.

The Foreign Office confirmed that two British people had been arrested and bailed, but would give no further details. A spokeswoman said: "We can confirm that two British nationals were arrested in Dubai on 1 January. Our embassy in Dubai is providing consular assistance."
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Briton imprisoned in UAE since May 'on suspicion of spying' | World news | The Guardian

Briton imprisoned in UAE since May 'on suspicion of spying' | World news | The Guardian | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, has intervened in the case of a Briton being held in detention in the United Arab Emirates, amid reports that the man is a PhD student accused of being a spy.

The Foreign Office said: “Our staff are supporting a British man following his detention in the UAE. We are assisting his family and remain in close contact with the local authorities. The foreign secretary has also personally raised his case with his Emirati counterpart.”

The man is a Durham university PhD student named Matthew Hedges, according to the Times. The 31-year-old has been held in solitary confinement since he was detained at Dubai airport in May as he tried to leave the country following a research trip, the paper said.

Hedges has only been allowed a handful of visits from his wife and Foreign Office officials since he was seized, it is claimed. On Wednesday he was reportedly taken to the UAE’s state security court for a hearing but no charges were outlined and the case was adjourned until later this month.

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Crown prince sought to lure Khashoggi back to Saudi Arabia and detain him, U.S. intercepts show - The

Crown prince sought to lure Khashoggi back to Saudi Arabia and detain him, U.S. intercepts show - The | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The crown prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman, ordered an operation to lure Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi back to Saudi Arabia from his home in Virginia and then detain him, according to U.S. intelligence intercepts of Saudi officials discussing the plan.

The intelligence, described by U.S. officials familiar with it, is another piece of evidence implicating the Saudi regime in Khashoggi’s disappearance last week after he entered the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. Turkish officials say that a Saudi security team lay in wait for the journalist and killed him.

Khashoggi was a prominent critic of the Saudi government and Mohammed in particular. Several of Khashoggi’s friends said that over the past four months, senior Saudi officials close to the crown prince had called Khashoggi to offer him protection, and even a high-level job working for the government, if he returned to his home country.
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Saudi consulate will be searched as pressure mounts over missing journalist | Euronews

Saudi consulate will be searched as pressure mounts over missing journalist | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Turkey's Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday they will search the Saudi consulate in Istanbul as part of an investigation in the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Hami Aksoy, the foreign ministry spokesman, said in a written statement that the consulate's building will be searched "in the framework of the investigation".

They didn't specify when the building would be searched.

Khashoggi was seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week but never came out.

The United States and Turkey are leading calls for Riyadh to provide evidence on the whereabouts of the missing journalist.
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Jamal Khashoggi: Turkey asks to search Saudi consulate

Jamal Khashoggi: Turkey asks to search Saudi consulate | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Turkey has asked for permission to search the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul as the mystery over the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi deepened.
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Former Suge Knight attorney — already facing witness-tampering charges — accused of $1 million in bank fraud | News & Features | ArcaMax Publishing

Former Suge Knight attorney — already facing witness-tampering charges — accused of $1 million in bank fraud | News & Features | ArcaMax Publishing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES -- An attorney who once represented Marion "Suge" Knight in the rap mogul's murder case was arrested Monday and charged with cashing
more than $1 million in stolen federal tax return checks, authorities
said.
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Christa Lynch's comment, October 14, 5:52 PM
Ummmm…. Is anyone really surprised? I guess I would be curious how he cam across these checks and why he was so dumb to deposit them and think he wasn’t going to get caught. As for the witness tampering….. doesn’t surprise me at all.
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Turkey says 'murder' team killed Saudi journalist at consulate: report

Turkey says 'murder' team killed Saudi journalist at consulate: report | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Turkish investigators say Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributor, was killed at the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul.
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Washington Post publishes blank column after the paper's Saudi journalist goes missing | Euronews

Washington Post publishes blank column after the paper's Saudi journalist goes missing | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Washington Post put out a blank column in its Friday edition after the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

A regular Post contributor, Khashoggi went into the Saudi embassy in Istanbul, Turkey, on Tuesday to get paperwork to get married next week but never came out, his fiancée, Hatice, told the Associated Press.

The Saudi writer was known for criticising the kingdom's crown prince in columns for the American newspaper.

In a separate editorial, the Post wrote “we are extremely disturbed to have had no contact from Jamal since he was last seen visiting a Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on Tuesday. At the time of this writing, we have not been able to reach him. We have inquired about Jamal’s whereabouts, and expressed our deep concern, to both Turkish and Saudi officials.”

The paper’s empty column was titled “A missing voice” and had Khashoggi’s byline.
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Sierra Grimes's comment, October 7, 8:48 PM
These are the kinds of things that really make me so grateful to be a citizen in a country that affords the right to free speech, and to be able to criticize actions of the government without being at risk of that same government either kidnapping me or killing me. I deeply hope that he is alive and makes it back home to his fiancée, but I’m not entirely optimistic.