Criminology and Economic Theory
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Is the Gates Foundation still investing in private prisons?

Is the Gates Foundation still investing in private prisons? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Bill and Melinda Gates' philanthropy won't say.
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, December 10, 2014 1:20 AM
Why is the financial actions of a company that does so much good in the world being so scrutinized? I understand the fact that private prisons are controversial, but saving thousands from Aids should give the Gates Foundation some leeway on their financial investments. Most billionaires know they have to invest in areas that make money. The most generous person in the world can’t make much of an impact unless they have the money to help. Obviously private prisons make money and so this foundation invests in it. The money the foundation makes is being used for very humanitarian and philanthropy causes and they should be applauded for their efforts. If the Gates foundation was supporting terrorism or illegal actions, I would understand the criticism, but making good financial decisions isn't something to get worked up about in my opinion.
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The Missing Middle: Meeting the Housing Demand in Walkable Urban Places | Delaware Valley Smart Growth Alliance

The Missing Middle: Meeting the Housing Demand in Walkable Urban Places | Delaware Valley Smart Growth Alliance | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
We build single-family homes, townhouses and apartments, but not much else.

What happened to the duplexes, twins, bungalow courts and other housing types so common to our region 100 years ago?

Daniel Parolek, renowned urban designer and architect with Opticos Design of Berkeley California, will share how the Missing Middle — compact and clustered home types such as manor houses, multiplexes and live/work units — can meet the growing housing demand in walkable urban places.

“Missing Middle Housing” was common to many pre-1940 neighborhoods. Despite market demand for the Missing Middle and its potential to improve housing affordability, our region doesn’t produce it.  Dan will highlight the need for more housing choices, the strategies for removing planning and zoning barriers to enable these types, and the key to getting buy in from community members and decision makers.
Rob Duke's insight:

The way we build, finance, and allocate public space no longer rewards reasonably sized and priced housing.

Imagine blocks of land with public infrastructure (streets, curbs, utilities) already installed.  Lots 55' wide with zoning that allows everything from small duplexes to a six-lot merge with a mansion.  Drive around 1920's neighborhoods in Chicago or Pasadena and look at the housing patterns and this institutional arrangement is what made that design possible.

In addition, low interest "sharing" financing through the YMCA made purchase of these lots affordable and accessible to anyone with a job.  Further, the same clubs allowed shared financing to buy house kits and then sharing labor through the club to put up the house.  Within just a few years, most of these families had owner-occupied housing often without a mortgage.  Imagine that!

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Big in China: Murder Villages and Scam Towns

Big in China: Murder Villages and Scam Towns | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Many chinese towns have grown fat off of single industries. Much of the world’s hosiery, for example, comes from the village of Datang, also known as “Sock City.” Songxia is dedicated to umbrellas. Jinjiang is all about zippers.

And Shisun, for a time, made a killing off of killing. Last year, Chinese prosecutors indicted 40 of the village’s residents for arranging 17 murders. At least 35 more deaths are under investigation; dozens more victims may never be known. News of Shisun’s killing ring provoked dismay in Hunan province, but not shock; similar gangs have been caught in Hebei, Henan, and Sichuan provinces. Indeed, the type of murder conspiracy seen in Shisun is so common that it has its own nickname: Mangjingshi Fanzui, after the film Mang Jing (“Blind Shaft”), which details a similar scheme. Like the movie’s characters, Shisun’s plotters killed migrant miners—staging each man’s death as a mining accident—then posed as grieving family members. Corrupt mine bosses in turn paid these impostor “families” hush money, rather than risk any investigation into working conditions. The scam was grisly but profitable—each death could net as much as $120,000, an unimaginable sum in a country where the average rural family’s annual income is $1,800. The new concrete houses that line the mud-brick village’s main street are a testament to the windfall.

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Belgian police shoot suspect in Brussels after knife attack

Belgian police shoot suspect in Brussels after knife attack | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Belgian police said they shot and seriously injured a man who attacked them with a knife after he was found sleeping rough near a center for asylum seekers in Brussels on Monday.
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Senior Google Scientist Quits Over Plans for Censored China Web Search

Senior Google Scientist Quits Over Plans for Censored China Web Search | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A senior researcher Jack Poulson quit his job at Google in protest over the company’s leaked plans to create a censored web search app for China - Dragonfly
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Most democratic countries in the world

Most democratic countries in the world | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A look at 50 of the most democratic nations, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit's Democracy Index.
Rob Duke's insight:

The U.S. is on the list, but not as close to the top as you might think.

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Thomas Lemelin's comment, September 16, 9:09 PM
To be completely honest I'm not as surprised that the United States isn't near the top of the list, I knew that there was numerous other democratic countries. As well as they also do a democracy way better than we do, the U.S. is still a young country with much to learn and we are getting there, I was surprised to see Canada in the top 5 however. What is so different from their democracy to ours that elevates them 14 positions over us?
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Ex-Melbourne Rebels flanker pleads not guilty over teammate assault | RNZ News

Former Melbourne Rebels flanker Amanaki Mafi has pleaded not guilty to the assault of team-mate Lopeti Timani.
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Paris knife attack: What we know so far | Euronews

Paris knife attack: What we know so far | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Seven people have been wounded, four seriously, after a man armed with an iron bar and knife went on a violent rampage in Paris on Sunday.
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Thomas Lemelin's comment, September 16, 8:45 PM
Reading this article just puts more to the argument against the ban on guns. This man wielded a knife and an iron bar and was able to stab seven people. Also I found it particular interesting in the comments the amount of people who were asking if the attacker was an illegal immigrant. These questions are something that everybody seems to ask now when these type of attacks occur. Also with having a little more insight on how the court systems in France work, it will be interesting to see how this case plays out. Im predicting he will go to Court of Assize but it could end up at the Court of Cassation. I'm eager to see what the aggravating circumstances were behind this attack. The article states that one of the people in the group who stopped the attacker said he "looked drugged". Which can be why it was so difficult to stop this man.
Justin Baugh's comment, September 17, 12:56 AM
Reading this article shows how one person whether or not they are an illegal immigrant or not can kill people with little to no motive known to the people around them. In the comments, the people were worried about if he was a migrant or a citizen. and there is no evidence that supports gun control in this article.
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Murdered Russian exile survived earlier poisoning attempt, police believe

Murdered Russian exile survived earlier poisoning attempt, police believe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Detectives investigating the murder of a Russian exile in London believe he was previously the target of a poisoning attempt carried out by two mysterious men from Moscow who visited him in a Bristol hotel room, the Guardian has learned.

Nikolai Glushkov, a friend of the late oligarch Boris Berezovsky and a prominent Kremlin critic, was found dead in March at his home in New Malden, south-west London. He had been strangled.

Glushkov is now thought to have survived a previous attempt to kill him by poisoning in 2013, the Guardian can reveal. Detectives are reinvestigating the incident as part of their inquiry into Glushkov’s murder, which took place a week after the novichok poisoning in Salisbury of Sergei and Yulia Skripal.

The revelation has emerged in the week that Scotland Yard named two Russian suspects in the Skripal attack as Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov. The names are believed to be fake. Theresa May told MPs this week that both were career officers working for Russia’s GRU military intelligence agency.
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MeKayla Dezarn's comment, September 14, 8:56 PM
Here is an example of political power being used in a bad way. I read other articles about other people who have opposed Putin and mysteriously died. It is suspected the Kremlin or Putin himself is behind these deaths. There is a sense of if you against them politically expect to die. It is scary to think of a government going to such an extreme to maintain its power and control.
Rob Duke's comment, September 14, 9:08 PM
Yes, and the losers, all around are the people. Gordon Tullock, a Nobel Prize Winning Economist, won on this idea of "rent-seeking" behavior. He showed how the Glorious Revolution set up conditions for the Industrial Revolution. You might think: "well, that's a stretch", but he makes a strong argument. Under the English Monarchy, you either were a sycophant or you watched your back. After the English Civil War and the swing back and forth between the Lord Protector (Oliver Cromwell, etc.) and the monarchy, William and Mary were invited to take the throne, but with a few provisions: 1. agree not to dissolve parliament; 2. support the Habeas Corpus Act; 3. Support the repeal of the Seditions act; and above all accept the English Bill of Rights. From this point on, the monarch was unable to ever put their "thumb on the scales of justice" and this leveling of the playing field created enough stability that new industries could flourish rather than being strangled with taxes and regulation. It's inevitable that Russia is missing out on economic investment and development because of this perception that enemies of the state may be run out of business, jailed, and even murdered.
Justin Baugh's comment, September 17, 12:22 AM
Some people with power do not want to lose that power and with that fear, they would go to great lengths to keep that power. With that being said assassinating people is a tricky thing to have accomplished.
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The growing revolt against Chinese ‘conquering’ French farms

The growing revolt against Chinese ‘conquering’ French farms | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The attachment to the countryside is embedded in the national identity and spelt out every time that rural environment is deemed to be under threat.

Having witnessed its prized Bordeaux vineyards gradually bought by Chinese investors, France is now on its guard against a similar “invasion” of its farmland. Newspaper headlines in recent months have tried to jolt the collective public mood.

“French fields on the Chinese platter”;

“When China launches the race to buy French farmland”;

“China conquering French farmland”;

And the storming-of-the-Bastille-like exclamation: “Chinese investors storm French farmland”.

From the Indre department in central France to Normandy and Brittany in the west, protests against what is seen as the mounting threat of Chinese takeovers of French farming land have been gaining momentum, culminating in a national demonstration in the Indre at the end of August, on land belonging to the Reward Group, whose slogan is “French fields to Chinese plates”.
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MeKayla Dezarn's comment, September 14, 10:45 PM
It was interesting to read about Chinese investors buying up farmland in France of all places. The article said the Chinese investors paid double or three times the market price of the land. Money is the Chinese investors source of power, and buying up farmland is a way for them to obtain more power. The article even states the billionaire Hu Keqin plans to "conqueror China with baguettes."
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Two terror cells dismantled in western Iran

Two terror cells dismantled in western Iran | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
TEHRAN – In a statement on Friday, the Intelligence Ministry announced that it had dismantled two terrorist cells in Kermanshah province, western Iran.

“Two armed terrorist cells which had illegally crossed into Iran were dismantled by intelligence forces in the western province of Kermanshah during two ambush operations,” the statement read, Mehr reported.

Two days after the assassination of Hassan Maleki, commander of the traffic police in Ravansar City in Kermanshah province on August 14, the intelligence forces arrested 12 members of a terrorist group related to this case, it added.
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London show hosts the first Saudi woman specializing in Islamic designs

London show hosts the first Saudi woman specializing in Islamic designs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Artist Lulwa Al-Homoud is the first Saudi woman to have her work displayed in front of a British audience, at the London Design Biennale, which runs at Somerset House in London from Sept. 4 to 23. 

The exhibition showcases the work of leading designers and innovators from 40 countries, focusing this year on how design influences our emotions and experiences.
Rob Duke's insight:

Islamic art cannot depict any objects, animals or people lest it promote idol worship, thus its art is limited.

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Sierra Grimes's comment, September 9, 5:42 PM
It's amazing to see how much art is molded by the culture that the artist identifies with, I can't even imagine being under the restrictions of those who are followers of Islam. Art is created nonetheless, and still holds its own against those from other countries. It's cool that the art is an incorporation of calligraphy and the language put into different patterns, I might have to try that art style out at some point.
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France investigates Liberian suspect for crimes against humanity

France investigates Liberian suspect for crimes against humanity | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
France has detained a suspected former militant commander from Liberia's brutal civil war and placed him under formal investigation for crimes against humanity for alleged atrocities including torture and cannibalism, police said Friday.
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Sweden election: The key issues in a pivotal vote

Sweden election: The key issues in a pivotal vote | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Voters in Sweden cast their ballots Sunday in a crucial election that could see the far-right become the second biggest party. Here's how the country compares to Europe on the key issues.
Rob Duke's insight:

Democracy Swedish-style...

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Merkel’s Spy Chief Is Removed After Public Rift - The New York Times

Merkel’s Spy Chief Is Removed After Public Rift - The New York Times | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The standoff had raised questions about whether Germany’s security apparatus was too close to the far right to monitor extremist groups effectively.
Rob Duke's insight:

The U.S. politics are pretty volatile right now, but here's a story to show that our system isn't the only one that can have these issues.

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Coca-Cola is eyeing the cannabis market

Coca-Cola is eyeing the cannabis market | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The world’s largest beverage company may be the next industry giant to jump into the cannabis drinks business.

Coca-Cola says it’s monitoring the nascent industry and is interested in drinks infused with CBD -- the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that treats pain but doesn’t get you high. The Atlanta-based soft drinks maker is in talks with Canadian marijuana producer Aurora Cannabis Inc. to develop the beverages, according to a report from BNN Bloomberg Television.

“We are closely watching the growth of non-psychoactive CBD as an ingredient in functional wellness beverages around the world,” Coca-Cola spokesman Kent Landers said in an emailed statement to Bloomberg News. “The space is evolving quickly. No decisions have been made at this time.” Landers declined to comment on Aurora.
Rob Duke's insight:

This makes some sense: one bottle to make you sleepy and one to wake you up (nod to Jefferson Airplane's White Rabbit), but it seems to me that the smart marketing money would be for Budweiser to get on this bandwagon: drink a little bud; or smoke a little bud.

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China will struggle to produce another Jack Ma - Ma where he came from?

China will struggle to produce another Jack Ma - Ma where he came from? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

THE most recognisable face of Chinese capitalism belongs to Jack Ma, the founder of Alibaba, an e-commerce juggernaut matched in size only by Amazon. Mr Ma, who launched Alibaba from a small apartment in Hangzhou in 1999, is an emblem of China’s extraordinary economic transformation. This week’s announcement that he will step down as the firm’s chairman a year from now, to concentrate on philanthropy, was greeted with comparative calm by investors. He stopped being chief executive in 2013; Alibaba’s share price has more than doubled since its initial public offering, the world’s largest-ever, in 2014 (see article). But one question presents itself: could China produce another story to match his? The answer is almost certainly not.

There are some very good reasons for that. China’s own rise is an unrepeatable one. When Mr Ma, then an English-language teacher, launched Alibaba, the country was still gearing up to join the World Trade Organisation. Its GDP per head, in terms of purchasing-power parity, stood at under $3,000; it is now more than six times higher. The internet was still young, too. Less than 1% of Chinese had access to the web back then, compared with some 36% of Americans. As incomes grew and connections proliferated, Mr Ma took full advantage.

Thousands of small businesses have since flourished on Alibaba’s platforms. About 1m merchants trade in its virtual emporiums. Its services have helped push China’s economy towards consumption-led growth. Last year it boasted sales of $25bn on Singles’ Day, China’s equivalent of Black Friday (when Americans spent a measly $5bn). It has transformed logistics and finance, as well as retailing. Last year Alibaba delivered an average of 55m packages a day; its financial offshoot, Ant Financial, accounts for more than half of China’s vast mobile-payments market. Its reach is so great that many startups decide to work with Alibaba rather than strike out alone.

But more has changed than the structure of China’s economy and the clout of digital giants like Alibaba. Politics has changed, too. Alibaba thrived partly thanks to Mr Ma’s skilful dealings with China’s ruling Communist Party, with which he cultivated both closeness and stand-offishness (“Love them, don’t marry them,” he once said of the government). Under the leadership of President Xi Jinping, however, China’s political system has grown hostile to private businesses that become too big or too disruptive. Officials have constrained bosses’ freedom to make splashy deals. Bytedance, a brash technology firm set up in 2012, has been reined in, and forced to withdraw one of its apps. Its founder issued a grovelling public apology after being chastised by the government. Ant, meanwhile, has seen its aspirations to compete with state-owned banks held back by regulators (see article).

China is putting its corporate champions at the service of its ambitions to compete globally in high-tech industries. Alibaba’s task is to use artificial intelligence to improve cities. Through state-backed venture-capital funds, the government is pouring money into industries that were once the preserve of the private sector. Rumours occasionally surface that it plans to take stakes and board seats in big tech firms. All this has fed growing international suspicion of China, especially in America. Mr Ma was one of the first out of the blocks to congratulate President Donald Trump on his election victory; this year America prevented Ant’s purchase of MoneyGram, a money-transfer firm, on national-security grounds. The reality was always more complicated, but Mr Ma embodies an idea of China as market-driven and open. That idea has faded.

Jack be nimble

None of this is to say that enterprise is fizzling in China. Indeed one of Mr Ma’s legacies is a shift to a culture that values startups more than ever. His charisma and folksy advice have earned him cult-like status among the country’s entrepreneurs. Venture capitalists are lavishing money on hundreds of newcomers, in industries from biotech to electric vehicles. Small private firms will continue to flourish.

But it is harder to be as disruptive today as Mr Ma was 20 years ago. That is partly because his own creation is so dominant. Increasingly, however, the greatest obstacle to disruption is China’s rulers. The party is intent on having a say much earlier in the development of industries that it considers important. As a result, China is unlikely to see new business leaders with the boldness and brio to match Mr Ma.

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Three killed in Mexico City tourist hotspot, police chase "mariachi" gunmen

Three killed in Mexico City tourist hotspot, police chase "mariachi" gunmen | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Gunmen with rifles and pistols killed three people on Friday and injured at least seven in a tourist plaza in downtown Mexico City, police said, adding that they were chasing three men dressed as mariachi musicians who fled on motorbikes.
Rob Duke's insight:

Don't worry: Antonio Banderas has an alibi.

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A sobering look at Islam and human-rights discourse - The many meanings of freedom

A sobering look at Islam and human-rights discourse - The many meanings of freedom | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

MOHAMMAD FADEL, an associate law professor at the University of Toronto, is one of North America’s most thoughtful commentators on the interface between Islam, liberal democracy and Western understandings of the rule of law. He has made an elaborate case for the possibility of Muslims, including theologically conservative ones, finding a comfortable place in a diverse, noisy liberal democracy where many value systems co-exist. He draws on the ideas of John Rawls, perhaps the greatest American political philosopher of the late 20th century, to show that “public reason” can serve as a kind of common denominator between citizens with utterly different world views. 

So it is sobering to find that in a newly published set of essays on Islam and the Western understanding of human rights, Mr Fadel puts more emphasis on difference than compatibility. His contribution is the sharpest of the essays, published by the Atlantic Council, an influential think-tank based in Washington, DC, under the title “The Islamic Tradition and the Human Rights Discourse”.  

Mr Fadel artfully uses a Western source to show that basic concepts like freedom and happiness have one meaning for a liberal humanist and another for a theist idealist who sees the purpose of human life as devotion to God. For somebody in the latter camp, an addicted gambler is anything but free; but to the secular liberal, that way of life could simply be one way of exercising formal freedom.

Islamic thought about the family, as Mr Fadel adds, is oriented not only to the short-term happiness of individuals, and also to other perceived desirables such as “a reasonably stable household that produces a new generation of Muslims.” So Muslim thinkers could not be expected to see religiously mixed marriages in the same light as a secular libertarian would. He concludes that:

It is impossible to expect a complete convergence between human rights norms and Islamic norms: human rights norms are almost entirely concerned with securing the autonomy of individuals to make choices for themselves, while Islam is about influencing individuals’ choices about how to live their lives. 

Asked if he had become more downbeat about Muslim communities finding a place in Western societies, Mr Fadel told Erasmus that he believed more passionately than ever in the need for such co-existence. But it was an observable fact that in Western societies, that effort was growing harder. Arguments, for example over female attire and the raising of children, suggest that in many Western countries, “liberals don’t trust Muslims, and therefore want to regulate their lives more closely, and Muslims don’t trust liberal society, which means they are less likely to have confidence in a neutral, rules-based political system and more likely to focus on their own communal life," he says.  

All the contributors to the new volume are themselves Muslim, and they bring to the subject of human rights concepts and assumptions that would be unfamiliar to most non-Muslims. Perhaps the most upbeat note is struck by the volume’s editor, H.A. Hellyer, who argues that Islam must rediscover the virtue of “rejuvenation”—new thinking about old texts and concepts—which, contrary to what many people say, is “deeply held within the Islamic tradition”. The oft-repeated proposition that in Islam, the gates of ijtihad (theological reasoning) were slammed shut a millennium ago is simply false, in Mr Hellyer’s view. 

Another contributor is Mustafa Ceric, the grand mufti emeritus of Sarajevo, who  makes a pointed rejoinder to Western critics of Islam. It takes the form of a riff on the word “dhimmitude”. Among contemporary Islamo-sceptics, that term has been used in two senses. It refers to the second-class but still protected status which traditional Muslim empires offered to non-Muslim, especially Christian and Jewish, subjects. Today’s sceptics also use the word to denounce Westerners who seem excessively deferential to Islam.

As Mr Ceric notes, the “dhimmi” status in Ottoman times did at least allow religious minorities to remain alive, as long as they were loyal and law-abiding. His co-religionists who suffered genocide in Bosnia did not benefit from any such concession. That is a fair point. But if we are to judge any religion (Islam, Christianity, even Buddhism) or secular creed (Marxism, nationalism, fascism) by the respect shown by its adherents for the right to life over the last couple of centuries, then none fares too well.

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Rebels star pleads not guilty to assaulting teammate

Rebels star pleads not guilty to assaulting teammate | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mafi, currently on bail in Japan, did not appear in the Dunedin District Court this morning when the case was called.

Lopeti Timani is currently playing in La Rochelle, France.

In mid-August counsel Anne Stevens told the court that a possible restorative justice meeting looked set to proceed. Timani's lawyer would provide contact details for his client and an independent facilitator would arrange the conversation between the international sport stars.

Today, Mrs Stevens said contacting Lopeti Timani had proved difficult. But a private restorative justice facilitator had spoken to him last Thursday and to Amanaki Mafi on Monday this week.
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Thomas Lemelin's comment, September 16, 8:58 PM
This article seemed difficult to read, like where did this Mrs. Stevens come from and who is she? The incident itself however is unacceptable and I'm glad the team itself did try to create some justice for their altercation that occurred after the game. After researching further I found that the event occurred in New Zealand, which poses another question about why Mafi is on bail in Japan? I hope the court system can get ahold of both parties and work something out to where the justice that is needed can be achieved or if both parties can agree to some kind of justice. I also believe that if the photos of the black eyes never surfaced that this case may have never been brought to light.
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Protesters rage in Koethen as two Afghans are arrested for German man's murder | Euronews

Protesters rage in Koethen as two Afghans are arrested for German man's murder | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An estimated two and a half thousand people took to the streets in an anti-migrant demonstration in the German city of Koethen last night.
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Egypt: Death sentences upheld for 75 people over 2013 demonstration

Egypt: Death sentences upheld for 75 people over 2013 demonstration | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Egyptian court on Saturday issued its final verdict upholding death sentences against 75 Muslim Brotherhood members and supporters -- including journalists -- for their participation in protests following the 2013 ouster of democratically elected President Mohamed Morsy.
Rob Duke's insight:

And video from Al Jazeera:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnEhGemZ7VE

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Thomas Lemelin's comment, September 10, 12:48 AM
This is something unimaginable that is occuring in Egypt, with their being 739 defendants. 75 being sentenced to death (44 who are incarcerated 31 on the run), 56 being sentenced to life, and 200 being sentenced to five years. Could you imagine something on this scale being done in the United States? Again this was all for a month long sit protesting the removal of a President. Granted the protest did eventually become violent after the security forces of the new President came in to power. I just couldn’t imagine a court system having to sift through this many names to determine the outcome on so many lives. This is truly something eye opening to the CJ system inside Egypt.
Amanda Watkins's comment, September 17, 2:19 AM
Reading this article, I cannot help but realize how lucky American citizens are. I could not imagine individuals receiving lengthy prison sentences and I some cases worse with death sentences for protesting things like clean drinking water. Or, even journalism which helps document important events throughout the years. It is so difficult to sit back because we are a different country and not want to impose our beliefs and customs onto them.
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Australian paramedics grant man's dying wish for an ice cream sundae

Australian paramedics grant man's dying wish for an ice cream sundae | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Last week he was rushed to hospital for palliative care, and sadly passed away on Saturday. At the time he had barely eaten anything for two days, a fact which his wife Sharon recounted to ambulance officers. Immediately sympathetic, they decided to ask him exactly what he wanted.

His answer? A classic caramel sundae.

In a heartwarming gesture of kindness, paramedics Kate and Hanna made a trip to their nearest McDonald's to pick up his treat.
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Robert Scott's comment, September 10, 12:03 AM
I found this to be a very heart warming action. It's great to acts of kindness still do occur in this day and age. I can only hope that people are this kind when my time comes to leave this world.
Rob Duke's comment, September 10, 12:05 AM
Me too. What a tribute to a person's life journey. I think there's a moment of zen in there, too.
Amanda Watkins's comment, September 17, 2:23 AM
This story makes me so happy. I feel like in this day and time it is not very often you come across people who are selfless and think “outside the box” when it comes to others; especially strangers happiness. Instead of just attempting to comfort him or get him from point A to point B they went above and beyond to do something nice for this elderly man. Knowing he experienced that kind of care and concern before he passed I am sure has brought great meaning to his family.
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Traffic violators get six months to settle fines - Saudi Gazette

Traffic violators get six months to settle fines - Saudi Gazette | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The directorate general of traffic (Muroor) has given traffic violators with unsettled fines either to pay them within six months or be ready to face courts.

The Muroor has fixed a ceiling for the violators to settle down the fines against them or be ready to face legal charges in courts, a report in the Makkah daily said on Wednesday

It said the courts will close down all the violator's computer services until the arrears are settled.

According to the Muroor, the violations which will be sent to court is the accumulation of the fines until they reach SR20,000 or that six months have past since the violator was first informed about the violation.

It said the violator with accumulated fines of SR20,000 will be asked to pay them within a month or else he/she will be sent to court.

Under the Muroor's new penal chart, leaving the car open with the engine on will be considered a violation for which the driver will be fined SR100-SR150.

Pedestrians crossing the streets from areas not specified for them will also be considered a violation for which a fine should be paid.

The Muroor said leaving the children under 10 years of age alone in the car without a mature companion is a violation for which the driver will be fined SR300-SR500.

Using smart phone while driving or crossing a tunnel without putting the lights on is a violation for which the motorist will be fined SR500-SR900.

If the driver refuses to show his driving license or the car registration to the traffic policemen he will be fined SR1,000-SR2,000.

Trucks not using the right lane or cars with unclear number plates is considered a violation for which a fine of S3,000-SR6,000 should be paid.

Driving under the influence of liquor or drugs is a grave violation for which a fine between SR5,000-SR10,000 should be paid.
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German police identify 6 who gave Nazi salute

German police identify 6 who gave Nazi salute | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
BERLIN (AP) — Police in the German state of Saxony said Thursday they have identified six far-right protesters who gave the stiff-armed Hitler salute or committed other violations at an anti-migrant protest last week.
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Justin Baugh's comment, September 17, 1:08 AM
With German history trying to be suppressed by its government because of its great blunders prior to and during WW2. The people who were arrested knew that they were breaking the law and now they will have to face the consequence.
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Officials Find A Mass Grave In Mexico : NPR

Officials Find A Mass Grave In Mexico : NPR | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mexican authorities say they found a clandestine grave with the remains of at least 166 people in the state of Veracruz — the latest mass grave in a place that has been marred by disappearances, warring drug cartels and government-sponsored violence.

Veracruz Attorney General Jorge Winckler said at a Thursday news conference that the site was discovered after a witness tipped off authorities about a month ago.

Since that time, investigators uncovered at least 166 skulls, he said. They also found 200 garments and other personal items, including more than 100 IDs. More may be uncovered.
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Sierra Grimes's comment, September 9, 5:48 PM
This really exemplifies what usually results when a government becomes entrenched with crime groups and is ruled by corruption. Having family ties to Mexico, it always saddens me that such a beautiful and culturally rich country has fallen to this level. It makes me wish that the U.S. would focus on trying to provide assistance rather than forcing a country in crisis into isolation.