Criminology and Economic Theory
21.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Former executioners share their misgivings about death penalty

Former executioners share their misgivings about death penalty | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Ron McAndrew, a former prison warden, said he began to have doubts about the death penalty after seeing flames dance from the head of an inmate strapped into Florida's electric chair.
more...
Eric Martinsen's comment, October 29, 2012 2:55 AM
I would imagine that killing people is not something that would go easily on your conscience, probably a bit worrying if it didn't. I used to be fine with the idea of the death penalty, really I'd still have no qualms with a person who committed a horrible crime be dead and unable to harm anyone further. However as justice classes have shown me, the death penalty is actually more costly, doesn't really help victims, and has had a disturbing amount of error in sentencing. For those reasons I am now against the death penalty, but I'd say just those reasons. It'd take a strong person to be the executioner though, to kill someone not fighting back is probably what makes it that much worse.
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Danish inventor jailed for life killing Swedish journalist onboard his submarine | Euronews

Danish inventor jailed for life killing Swedish journalist onboard his submarine | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Danish court has sentenced submarine entrepreneur Peter Madsen to life behind bars for murdering reporter Kim Wall
Rob Duke's insight:

The civil law system moves quickly.  The prosecutor and police build the dossier and then trial also proceeds quickly.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Measuring a progressive society - Daily chart

Measuring a progressive society - Daily chart | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The nations above the trend line punch well above their weight in delivering services and promoting equal and tolerant societies relative to their wealth. But because the line shows the statistical relationship between GDP and SPI scores, it is skewed by the wealth of the Gulf states. Thus the authors also benchmark the performance of a country relative to the 15 countries closest to it in GDP. On this measure, 19 countries overperform; Costa Rica and Uruguay do particularly well. Latin American countries’ efforts to build democratic institutions that include human rights have helped the region considerably. Oil- and resource-rich Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates are the worst of the 35 underperforming nations, and fall spectacularly below the average owing to closed and restrictive cultures and poor scores on religious tolerance and personal freedom. The United States underperforms by around 5 points, between Venezuela and Egypt. Bulgaria has a similar level of GDP to Thailand, but the money contributed by the European Union pulls it considerably higher.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Yes Loitering Project Asks Kids Of Color To Rethink Public Space

The Yes Loitering Project Asks Kids Of Color To Rethink Public Space | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This project helps kids understand how many spaces they’re excluded from, and then asks them to imagine new kinds of public spaces that would serve them better.
Rob Duke's insight:

Let them help you find the place, work with property owners, establish some boundaries and codes of conduct, then largely let them police themselves.  Cops should trust, but verify in a respectful and nonchalance manner.  I've found this to build community and avoid problems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

French MPs ban meaty words to describe vegetarian food | Euronews

French MPs ban meaty words to describe vegetarian food | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
‘Vegan sausages’, ‘soya steaks’ and ‘quorn fillets’ will soon be a thing of the past in France.
Rob Duke's insight:

I get protecting cheeses and wines with the regional names from which they have traditionally been created/invented, but it seems hardly likely that carnivores will be fooled by fake meat....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

French terror suspect to stand trial for killing 4 at Jewish Museum in Brussels | Euronews

French terror suspect to stand trial for killing 4 at Jewish Museum in Brussels | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The attack shocked Europe and led to more security around Jewish institutions
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Slovakia police chief steps down as protests persist | Euronews

Slovakia police chief steps down as protests persist | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Slovakia’s national police chief has resigned amid public pressure following the assassination of a journalist in February who was investigating alleged government corruption.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's another example in Europe.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Radovan Karadzic appeals 40 year jail sentence | Euronews

Radovan Karadzic appeals 40 year jail sentence | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is to launch his appeal this week against a 40 year prison sentence for genocide and war crimes during the 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

Karadzic, a former psychiatrist, is the highest-ranking official sentenced by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, set up in 1993 to prosecute those behind the Balkans bloodshed.

Two years ago Karadzic, now aged 72, was convicted of crimes committed during the break-up of Yugoslavia in the 1990s, including the killing of 8,000 Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica.
Rob Duke's insight:

Justice sometimes comes slow in war crime tribunals....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

India seeks death penalty for child rapists

India seeks death penalty for child rapists | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
India's Cabinet has passed an executive order to make the rape of a girl under 12 punishable by the death penalty as national outrage grows over sexual violence in the country.

The order -- known as an ordinance -- was approved Saturday at a Cabinet meeting chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, according to India's Ministry of Women and Child Development.
The change in the law will only become permanent once it is approved by India's Parliament, which is currently in recess. It goes into effect once it's signed by the President, considered a formality, but it will lapse after six months if Parliament doesn't ratify it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

An alarming rise in mental-health sectioning in Britain - Locked away

An alarming rise in mental-health sectioning in Britain - Locked away | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

I CAN’T remember how many times I was sectioned,” says Hannah MacDonald, a former nurse. She recalls much of the first time, though. During therapy in 2007 she mentioned that she had self-harmed and had suicidal thoughts. The next morning, on arriving at work, she was taken to a windowless room in the bowels of a psychiatric hospital in London. There, a doctor asked probing questions about her mental health. Soon more unknown faces entered the room to observe her. She began to feel overwhelmed and her speech slowed. Then she was told she had been detained under section two of the Mental Health Act. After that, Ms MacDonald recalls only a few things, including being told that if she refused medication, she would be injected. It took eight months for her to be released.

Ms MacDonald is part of a growing cohort. The number of detentions under the Mental Health Act in England rose from 43,463 in 2009 to 63,622 in 2016. The process requires two doctors and one approved mental-health professional, like a social worker or nurse, to agree that a patient needs hospital treatment for a mental-health disorder, and that they may pose a danger to themself or others.

Experts admit it is impossible to know whether the increase is justified or not. But many are alarmed by its sheer speed. Some also worry that those with only minor conditions are being swept up in the rise.

What is behind it? One theory blames the underfunding of early-intervention services. These were set up by hospital trusts in the early 2000s, after which the number of detentions began slowly to fall. But since 2011 mental-health spending in Britain has fallen by about 1% in real terms, while greater public awareness of mental-health issues has stoked demand for services. As a result, mental-health teams are stretched. Someone with psychosis, for instance, should receive treatment in two weeks but may wait up to six months, says Will Johnstone of Rethink Mental Illness, a charity. In that time their condition may deteriorate, leading them to be sectioned.

Another factor is a long-term drop in the number of beds for psychiatric patients. A shift away from hospital treatment to care in the community saw the number fall from about 155,000 in 1954 to around 20,000 today. Most have welcomed the change. But a lack of beds raises the pressure to discharge patients early, meaning some need to be sectioned again. A survey by the Royal College of Psychiatrists in 2014 found that about a fifth of trainee psychiatrists had sectioned patients just to secure them a bed and care.

Doctors have also become more risk-averse, says Sir Simon Wessely, professor of psychiatry at King’s College, London, and the chairman of an official review into sectioning set up last year. In 2014 a Supreme Court judgment broadened the definition of unlawful deprivation of liberty. One effect is that some elderly folk with dementia, who had previously been kept in hospital with a bit of informal persuasion by doctors and relatives, are now being sectioned in order to avoid accusations of unlawful detention. A recent report by the Care Quality Commission, a watchdog, revealed that in some wards for elderly people, every patient had been sectioned.

Doctors also seem to be more nervous than before about suicide. In 2009 the National Health Service drew up a list of eight “never events”, errors so grave they should be expected never to happen, and which trigger an internal investigation if they do. It includes patients using curtain or shower rails to commit suicide in mental-health units. In January Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, launched a “zero-suicide target” in hospitals. Such a focus may encourage doctors to increase the supervision of their patients by sectioning them sooner and for longer, rather than risking a death.

That risk-aversion may also harm the recovery of those detained, argues Ms MacDonald. She eventually recovered in a hospital which let her take up pastimes like embroidery and walking in the garden. Such activities calmed her down when she felt depressed. Yet stricter infirmaries did not allow them, for fear of self-harm.

The rise in sectioning has disproportionately affected ethnic minorities. Black people are four times more likely to be sectioned than whites. This long-standing pattern is partly explained by black Britons’ lower incomes, which are linked to poor mental health. But it is also down to discrimination and a lack of black people in senior roles in mental-health services, says Patrick Vernon of Black Thrive, a charity.

Sir Simon’s review will report its initial findings in the next few weeks and make proposals later in the year. Some will be quick fixes, but mental-health legislation can take decades to change because it is so complex, he warns. One hurdle is legal, since the rules on sectioning are tied to other laws, such as the Mental Capacity Act. Another is ethical, because of the need to balance individuals’ right to liberty against the state’s duty to protect them and others. And a third is scientific, as mental illness has many causes, from the genetic to the economic. The rise in sectioning may have been rapid, but anyone hoping for an overhaul of the system is in for a long wait.

Rob Duke's insight:

Some insight on why England may have fewer mass shooter incidents than does the U.S.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Chuck Schumer to Unveil Bill Decriminalizing Marijuana

Chuck Schumer to Unveil Bill Decriminalizing Marijuana | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is planning to introduce a bill on Friday that would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Instagram-Famous Cocaine Mule Sentenced to Eight Years

Instagram-Famous Cocaine Mule Sentenced to Eight Years | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Melina Roberge will remain behind bars until at least 2021 for role in cruise ship drug trafficking
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Parents now spend twice as much time with their children as 50 years ago - Daily chart

Parents now spend twice as much time with their children as 50 years ago - Daily chart | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
PARENTS these days spend a lot more time with their offspring, or at least middle-class parents do. One analysis of 11 rich countries estimates that the average mother spent 54 minutes a day caring for children in 1965 but 104 minutes in 2012. Men do less than women, but far more than men in the past: their child-caring time has jumped from 16 minutes a day to 59.


At the same time a gap has opened between working-class and middle-class parents. In 1965 mothers with and without a university education spent about the same amount of time on child care. By 2012 the more educated ones were spending half an hour more per day. The exception is France, where the stereotype of a bourgeois couple sipping wine and ignoring their remarkably well-behaved progeny appears to be accurate.
Rob Duke's insight:

If you asked Travis Hirschi why crime has gone down, he might say something like: we're keeping our kids engaged more, which is teaching them more self-control.  Now we have some data to back that up.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Emotional day in court for US pastor jailed in Turkey

Following an attempted coup in Turkey, Andrew Brunson, a 50-year-old evangelical pastor from North Carolina, was arrested as part of a sweeping crackdown on political opponents of president Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Despite his case being raised by U.S. officials at the highest levels, including President Donald Trump, he's now standing trial for terrorism and espionage.

Brunson faces up to 35 years in prison.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Suspect in Golden State killer,' 'East Area Rapist' case arrested

Suspect in Golden State killer,' 'East Area Rapist' case arrested | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
After more than three decades, authorities have made an arrest in the notorious 'Golden State Killer' case, according to the Sacramento Bee.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is good.  We usually suspect when a murder spree stops that the offender is incapacitated or dead.  Now we may learn how and why a serial criminal may become active and then go on hiatus.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Life support ‘withdrawn’ from toddler Alfie Evans as parents lose appeal | Euronews

Life support ‘withdrawn’ from toddler Alfie Evans as parents lose appeal | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The father of Alfie Evans, a seriously ill toddler at the heart of a much publicised UK court battle over his condition, has said his son’s life support has been turned off.

Tom Evans said the 23-year-old was breathing on his own and had received oxygen.

The boy has been treated at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in Liverpool since December 2016 with a rare degenerative neurological condition, as yet undiagnosed.

Alfie’s parents have lost legal challenges against a ruling by the High Court that the hospital could withdraw life support. Tom Evans and Kate James had asked for a delay to allow time for a further appeal. Judges at the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) have refused to intervene.

The couple’s barrister and the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs said on Monday that the child had been granted Italian citizenship. They want him to be flown for treatment to a hospital in Rome which has links with the Vatican.
Rob Duke's insight:

A tragic case.  In the U.S., we prosecute parents who fail to sustain children with appropriate medical care.  Even to the point where we will not allow life support to be withdrawn. In contrast, in England, this case shows a much different view.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Video of tense arrest appears to show man pointing object at Toronto officer

Video of tense arrest appears to show man pointing object at Toronto officer | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The suspected driver extends and points an object at what looks like a Toronto police officer drawing his weapon.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Suspect in Berlin anti-Semitism attack turns himself in: police | Euronews

Suspect in Berlin anti-Semitism attack turns himself in: police | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A 19-year-old suspect in Berlin's most recent anti-Semitism attack has turned himself in to police, German authorities said on Thursday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

France: Government guarantees firms won't make profit from private speed radars | Euronews

France: Government guarantees firms won't make profit from private speed radars | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As the French government rolls out the first set of private speed radars in Normandy, it reassures the public that firms won't be making a profit from speeding drivers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Watch: Demonstrators wrestle with police at Armenia anti-PM protest | Euronews

Watch: Demonstrators wrestle with police at Armenia anti-PM protest | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Demonstrators clashed with police in Armenia as anti-prime minister protests entered their eighth day.
Rob Duke's insight:

Though they've had days of violent protest, the democratic system works.  The Prime Minister announced today that he will resign, which opens new elections.  That's not to say that their problems are over, but it does provide for a peaceful transition of power to a new government.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam found guilty by Belgian court | Euronews

Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam found guilty by Belgian court | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam has been sentenced to 20-years after being found guilty of attempted terrorist murder during a 2016 shootout in Belgium.

Abdeslam, the prime survivng suspect of the 2015 Paris attacks, was arrested after a gunfight in which several Belgian police officers were injured.
Rob Duke's insight:

Only two years from beginning to end on a very high profile case.  Can you see this proceeding this quickly in the U.S.?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

New web platform allows public to grade government employees | Miami Herald

New web platform allows public to grade government employees | Miami Herald | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
If you've ever dealt with one of Miami's public employees and have something to say about the experience — good or bad — you're about to get a digital suggestion box to speak your piece.

A new startup called CityGrader has launched a website where anyone can leave reviews of municipal employees and departments online for the whole world to read. Think Yelp or TripAdvisor for Miami's government. That includes cops, clerks, parks personnel, elected officials and entire city departments, such as code compliance and building.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

China challenged Australian warships in South China Sea, reports say

China challenged Australian warships in South China Sea, reports say | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull asserted the right of the Australian navy to travel the South China Sea, after local media reported three Australian warships were challenged by the Chinese navy earlier this month.
Rob Duke's insight:

A story to follow with one of our case study systems.  Over the last decade, China brought in ton after ton of soil to turn a small atol and shallow water in the South China sea into islands capable of having a "usable" airstrip.  Now they assert that the entire sea is in their jurisdiction and have been warning airplanes and now ships to stay out of the area.  We can expect to see more of this as China is building up its navy.  It's first of several aircraft carriers launched last year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Alaska corrections leaders look to Norway for inspiration

Alaska corrections leaders look to Norway for inspiration | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the last two decades, Norway has made a series of changes to lower their recidivism rate --  the rate people convicted of crimes re-offend. These changes include making life in prison look a lot more like normal life.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

94-year-old former Auschwitz guard charged with accessory to murder | Euronews

94-year-old former Auschwitz guard charged with accessory to murder | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Authorities estimate that 13,335 people were sent to the gas chambers during his time at the death camp.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How the United States Can Reduce Heroin Overdoses

How the United States Can Reduce Heroin Overdoses | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In 1995, France made it so any doctor could prescribe buprenorphine without any special licensing or training. Buprenorphine, a first-line treatment for opioid addiction, is a medication that reduces cravings for opioids without becoming addictive itself.

With the change in policy, the majority of buprenorphine prescribers in France became primary-care doctors, rather than addiction specialists or psychiatrists. Suddenly, about 10 times as many addicted patients began receiving medication-assisted treatment, and half the country’s heroin users were being treated. Within four years, overdose deaths had declined by 79 percent.
more...
No comment yet.