Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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California considering end to felony murder rule

California considering end to felony murder rule | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A bill in the California legislature could curtail felony murder prosecutions in the state.
Rob Duke's insight:

Is the get-away car driver just as responsible as the gunman?  That's the issue.

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Raymond N's comment, July 16, 6:14 AM
This is a complicated position, but it makes sense.
Travante williams's comment, July 18, 7:28 PM
I am for it , there's people serving time for a crime another person committed. Understood that some may have been the reason or part of the conspiracy. Its difficult, maybe cases have to be reevaluated and put under a different microscope. But I think this is a good move.
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Deputy PD Lawfully Arrested for Blocking Police in Photographing Her Client

Deputy PD Lawfully Arrested for Blocking Police in Photographing Her Client | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:

WCC, or is this something that we've over-defined as crime?

 

Should we arrest for obstruction? Or, is this something she could have been censored by the bar association and the evidence (photos) gathered via court order?

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William Kelley's comment, July 14, 2:33 AM
I can't help but to think that there is more to the story, however, it does go to show that full cooperation is a must and not to test limits when dealing with police.
Raymond N's comment, July 16, 5:58 AM
After reading this article all I could think of was how much they wasted energy and resources for something that came with no criminal charges, just to prove a position.
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Iranian police arrest 'Sultan of Coins'

Iranian police arrest 'Sultan of Coins' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police say the man hoarded two tonnes of gold coins in order to manipulate the local market.
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Barnes & Noble fires CEO Demos Parneros 

Barnes & Noble fires CEO Demos Parneros  | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Barnes & Noble said Tuesday that it has fired CEO Demos Parneros for violating company policies.

The company did not specify exactly which policies were violated. It did say, however, that Parneros' termination "is not due to any disagreement with the Company regarding its financial reporting, policies or practices or any potential fraud relating thereto."
Rob Duke's insight:

The way they phrased the termination makes one wonder if fraud wasn't involved.

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Redoine Faid escapes French prison on hijacked helicopter

Redoine Faid escapes French prison on hijacked helicopter | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A notorious French gangster has managed to escape prison again. This time, with help from armed friends using a hijacked helicopter and smoke bombs.

Redoine Faid, 46, who escaped prison five years ago using explosives, broke out of a prison near Paris on Sunday. He was serving a 25-year sentence for planning a robbery where a police officer was killed.

Two or three men armed with assault rifles hijacked a helicopter and forced the pilot to fly to Faid's prison in Seine-et-Marne. When the helicopter landed, two men dressed all in black, opened the prison door using a grinding machine and took Faid. At the time, he was meeting with his brother in a visitation room, members of the guards’ union, told France's BFM television. The men set off smoke bombs to blur the scene from video surveillance, union member Loic Delbroc said. 

France’s Justice Ministry said the escape was over in just "a few minutes."
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William Kelley's comment, July 14, 2:32 AM
This needs to be brought up anytime there is a question about whether the possibility of escape is probably or not.
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Authorities warn Chinese Americans about 'Embassy Scam' after victim loses $3M

Authorities warn Chinese Americans about 'Embassy Scam' after victim loses $3M | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Authorities warned Monday about a phone scam targeting San Francisco’s Chinese-American community, with one victim losing nearly $3 million.
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City Takes Funeral Home to Court Over Sales Practices

City Takes Funeral Home to Court Over Sales Practices | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The City Attorney's Office sued a South Los Angeles funeral home Friday for allegedly ignoring demands to bring their sales practices into compliance with state and federal law.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's an interesting WCC....

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Expect more criminal charges in trench deaths

Expect more criminal charges in trench deaths | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The second-degree manslaughter charge, filed by the King County Prosecutor’s Office on January 8, 2018, is one of six trench-collapse deaths since 2015 in which a local prosecutor has filed charges. In two of those cases, one in New York City and another in Santa Clara County, California, three people were sentenced to a year or more in prison.

Buoyed by the recent convictions and filing of criminal charges, some workers’ advocates hope to see more such local prosecutions around the country. They believe the maximum penalty under federal occupational safety laws for a worker’s death, a misdemeanor that carries up to six months in jail, is too lax to deter worksite negligence. They also say the Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t refer enough cases to the U.S. Justice Department for criminal prosecution.
Rob Duke's insight:

Easily preventable, but workers must be trained and be properly equipped with bracing materials.  When bosses ignore these essentials, they should be culpable.

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William Kelley's comment, July 1, 11:32 PM
It is often too easy to look the other way in simple safety violations like this, especially when you're the boss.
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Voices from inside San Quentin - CBS News

Voices from inside San Quentin - CBS News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The popular podcast Ear Hustle features the stories of life within the California prison's walls – just an example of how "The Q" is changing
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Devon Smale's comment, June 26, 1:30 AM
This story really made me sad. I have heard a lot of bad things about San Quentin, but I am glad to see things starting to change. Even if prisoners don't get out of jail, some of these programs offered at "The Q" have changed the way that many prisoners view life ,even those serving 1,002 years to life. I didn't even know that was a sentence but apparently it is.
Michael Annunziato's comment, June 28, 11:19 PM
I believe "Ear Hustle" and other such programs give inmates a sense of being and something to strive for in a world of complete despair. The podcasts are censored which is a very good idea and is a real life inside the bars look at daily prison life. These sorts of programs are also a very good way to fill the endless void of free time which helps curb violence and other behavioral issues that may arise due to boredom and constantly thinking about how bad it is to know that you will die in prison and never again get to experience the outside world.
William Kelley's comment, July 1, 11:40 PM
It is always good to see positive changes in a place like that and even better to hear that it is recognized and appreciated by the inmates themselves.
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The Counterfeit Report | Press Release

The Counterfeit Report | Press Release | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Counterfeit Report
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Devon Smale's comment, July 13, 6:20 PM
This article is interesting and seems to be a problem that will not go away anytime soon. I am not sure what ebay sells are far as counterfeit items, but I know that Amazon sells their box that people buy from the site and then they have access to movies that are still playing in the theater. I did not know that things like this were able to be sold on Amazon, but it needs to stop. They are playing into the corrupt corporation just because of money and that is stupid. Amazon makes enough money that they do not need the counterfeit products!
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Supreme Court says police can't use your cellphone to track you without a court order

Supreme Court says police can't use your cellphone to track you without a court order | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The decision requires police departments nationwide to get a search warrant in order to obtain telephone company data to track where a user has been.
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Michael Annunziato's comment, June 28, 11:33 PM
This is a no-brainer in my opinion. The government should never be allowed to track you without receiving permission from a judge. The deciding judge must be provided adequate evidence that you are involved in illegal activity and the surveillance and tracking of you is warranted to stop future crimes from being committed. This is US Constitution 101. I believe the founders made it quite clear that the state can not exercise any type of authority over it's citizens without due process and probable cause.
Raymond N's comment, July 2, 2:38 AM
It is a right of citizens to have some sense of privacy. This should be a given that police should be requires to get a court order before they cross this line.
Dalston's comment, July 2, 4:11 AM
Good! They should not be doing that anyway. That's an invasion of privacy and police should be held accountable.
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Legal marijuana will roll out differently in Canada than in U.S.

Legal marijuana will roll out differently in Canada than in U.S. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
With marijuana legalization across Canada on the horizon, the industry is shaping up to look different from the way it does in nine U.S. states that have legalized adult recreational use of the drug.
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Dalston's comment, June 25, 4:25 AM
Canada really is outdoing themselves. They actually care about their people and work hard to keep everyone happy. Every time I read something about Canada, it seems to be good news that is beneficial to their people. Never any violence or discrimination. What a concept.
Michael Annunziato's comment, June 28, 11:56 PM
Dalston: I'm not sure how this can be seen as protecting its people and out doing themselves. How is the government of Canada keeping everyone happy? By making it possible for 18 year olds to purchase mind altering drugs? By basically controlling the way pot is sold and purchased under the guise of allowing the provinces to make very minor decisions about distribution of pot. How does this keep organized crime and criminals out of the marijuana industry? This article, in my opinion, is basically saying that the Canadian government wants its cut from the very popular and extremely lucrative industry.
Raymond N's comment, July 9, 6:33 AM
Canada seems to be doing something right, they have a great healthcare system and now this. According to the article, marijuana will be able to be ordered online and delivered through the mail.
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Sophisticated insertion of missing middle

Sophisticated insertion of missing middle | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A transit-accessible infill development includes a variety of housing types geared to improving the economics of urban living.
Rob Duke's insight:

Good planning and low crime are inter-related.

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Grand Theft Charges For A LA County Sheriff’s Deputy

Grand Theft Charges For A LA County Sheriff’s Deputy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LAC Sheriff's Deputy Matt Kochaon (dob 4/30/64) faces grand theft charges due to his alleged misdeeds. Falsifying records have led to felony charges
Rob Duke's insight:

Falsifying O.T. records=WCC?

Is this a WCC or just a regular old blue collar crime?

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Dalston's comment, July 16, 2:05 AM
This is why people have a hard time trusting the police. They think they are above the law and they're not. This angers me.
Raymond N's comment, July 16, 5:53 AM
I found this article to be quite interesting. It amazes me how other could think that they are above the law. To falsify documents and change a persons life on lies is completely unethical .
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Several ex-members of Japan doomsday cult including leader executed: media

Several ex-members of Japan doomsday cult including leader executed: media | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The former leader of Aum and several other members of the Japanese doomsday cult that carried out a deadly sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway in 1995 were executed on Friday, public broadcaster NHK reported.

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William Kelley's comment, July 14, 2:36 AM
Reading his bio and examining him at first glance would not lead one to believe his capabilities. This just goes to show what the world is made of.
Travante williams's comment, July 18, 7:32 PM
Not to justify what this guy has did or what he stands for, but based on this , he's a genus in book Being blind, orchestrating attacks on high levels we see on movies. I am intrigued, I want to see who this guy was
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In praise of gentrification - Urban myths

In praise of gentrification - Urban myths | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

GENTRIFIER has surpassed many worthier slurs to become the dirtiest word in American cities. In the popular telling, hordes of well-to-do whites are descending upon poor, minority neighbourhoods that were made to endure decades of discrimination. With their avocado on toast, beard oil and cappuccinos, these people snuff out local culture. As rents rise, lifelong residents are evicted and forced to leave. In this view, the quintessential scene might be one witnessed in Oakland, California, where a miserable-looking homeless encampment rests a mere ten-minute walk from a Whole Foods landscaped with palm trees and bougainvillea, offering chia and flax seed upon entry. An ancient, sinister force lurks behind the overpriced produce. “‘Gentrification’ is but a more pleasing name for white supremacy,” wrote Ta-Nehisi Coates. It is “the interest on enslavement, the interest on Jim Crow, the interest on redlining, compounding across the years.”

This story is better described as an urban myth. The supposed ills of gentrification—which might be more neutrally defined as poorer urban neighbourhoods becoming wealthier—lack rigorous support. The most careful empirical analyses conducted by urban economists have failed to detect a rise in displacement within gentrifying neighbourhoods. Often, they find that poor residents are more likely to stay put if they live in these areas. At the same time, the benefits of gentrification are scarcely considered. Longtime residents reap the rewards of reduced crime and better amenities. Those lucky enough to own their homes come out richer. The left usually bemoans the lack of investment in historically non-white neighbourhoods, white flight from city centres and economic segregation. Yet gentrification straightforwardly reverses each of those regrettable trends.

The anti-gentrification brigades often cite anecdotes from residents forced to move. Yet the data suggest a different story. An influential study by Lance Freeman and Frank Braconi found that poor residents living in New York’s gentrifying neighbourhoods during the 1990s were actually less likely to move than poor residents of non-gentrifying areas. A follow-up study by Mr Freeman, using a nationwide sample, found scant association between gentrification and displacement. A more recent examination found that financially vulnerable residents in Philadelphia—those with low credit scores and no mortgages—are no more likely to move if they live in a gentrifying neighbourhood.

These studies undermine the widely held belief that for every horrid kale-munching millennial moving in, one longtime resident must be chucked out. The surprising result is explained by three underlying trends.

The first is that poor Americans are obliged to move very frequently, regardless of the circumstances of their district, as the Princeton sociologist Matthew Desmond so harrowingly demonstrated in his research on eviction. The second is that poor neighbourhoods have lacked investment for decades, and so have considerable slack in their commercial and residential property markets. A lot of wealthier city dwellers can thus move in without pushing out incumbent residents or businesses. “Given the typical pattern of low-income renter mobility in New York City, a neighbourhood could go from a 30% poverty population to 12% in as few as ten years without any displacement whatsoever,” noted Messrs Freeman and Braconi in their study. Indeed, the number of poor people living in New York’s gentrifying neighbourhoods barely budged from 1990 to 2014, according to a study by New York University’s Furman Centre. Third, city governments often promote affordable-housing schemes, such as rent control or stabilisation, in response to rising rents.

Gentrification has been so thoroughly demonised that a mere discussion of its benefits might seem subversive. That does not make them any less real. Residents of gentrifying neighbourhoods who own their homes have reaped considerable windfalls. One black resident of Logan Circle, a residential district in downtown Washington, bought his home in 1993 for $130,000. He recently sold it for $1.6m. Businesses gain from having more customers, with more to spend. Having new shops, like well-stocked grocery stores, and sources of employment nearby can reduce commuting costs and time. Tax collection surges and so does political clout. Crime, already on the decline in American city centres, seems to fall even further in gentrifying neighbourhoods, as MIT economists observed after Cambridge, Massachusetts, undid its rent-control scheme.

Those who bemoan segregation and gentrification simultaneously risk contradiction. The introduction of affluent, white residents into poor, minority districts boosts racial and economic integration. It can dilute the concentration of poverty—which a mountain of economic and sociological literature has linked to all manner of poor outcomes, including teenage pregnancy, incarceration and early death. Gentrification steers cash into deprived neighbourhoods and brings people into depopulated areas through market forces, all without the necessity of governmental intervention. The Trump administration is unlikely to offer large infusions of cash to dilapidated cities. In these circumstances, arguing against gentrification can amount to insistence that poor neighbourhoods remain poor and that racially segregated neighbourhoods stay cut off.

What, then, accounts for the antipathy towards gentrification? The first reason is financial. Though the process has been going on for a few decades, the increased attention comes in the middle of a broader concern about the cost of housing in American cities. The share of households that are “rent burdened”—those spending more than 30% of pre-tax income on rent—has increased from 32% in 2001 to 38% in 2015. Things are worse among the poor; 52% of those below the federal poverty line spend over half their income on housing. Rents have risen dramatically, though this can be the fault of thoughtless regulations which hinder supply more than the malevolence of gentrifiers. The net creation of jobs has outpaced additional housing in New York City by a rate of two to one. In San Francisco, perhaps the most restricted American metropolitan area, this ratio is eight to one.

A second reason gentrification is disliked is culture. The argument is that the arrival of yuppie professionals sipping kombucha will alter the character of a place in an unseemly way. “Don’t Brooklyn my Detroit” T-shirts are now a common sight in Motor City. In truth, Detroit would do well with a bit more Brooklyn. Across big American cities, for every gentrifying neighbourhood ten remain poor. Opposing gentrification has become a way for people to display their anti-racist bona fides. This leads to the exaggerated equation of gentrification with white supremacy. Such objections parallel those made by white NIMBYs who fret that a new bus stop or apartment complex will bring people who might also alter the culture of their neighbourhood—for the worse.

Porcini progressives

The term gentrification has become tarred. But called by any other name—revitalisation, reinvestment, renaissance—it would smell sweet. Take Shaw, a historical centre of black culture in Washington which limped into the 1970s as a shadow of itself after a series of race riots. Decades of decline followed, in which a crack epidemic caused the murder rate to spike. Today, crime is down. The O Street Market, where one person was killed and eight were injured in a shoot-out in 1994, is now a tranquil grocery store. Luxury flats with angular chairs and oversized espresso machines in the lobby have sprouted opposite liquor stores. An avant-garde speakeasy beckons from the basement beneath a humble doughnut store. At the Columbia Room, a wood-panelled bar with leather chairs, mixologists conjure $16 concoctions of scotch, blackberry shrub and porcini mushrooms. This is how progress tastes.

Rob Duke's insight:

Gentrification seeks to undo the under-investment that is the cause of much of the problems in underclass neighborhoods.  It's import, however, that regulation ensures that those who live there now aren't displaced.  

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Dalston's comment, July 16, 2:00 AM
These things really upset me because it always turns into a black and white situation. It always seems like black people are fighting for basic human respect and white people just don't like to listen. If you want to see a difference in a community, help others and be that difference.
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Innovating to Meet the Need for Attainable Housing

Innovating to Meet the Need for Attainable Housing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Just as millennials are belatedly entering the housing market in greater numbers, developers face a daunting array of challenges that they did not have when they erected starter homes for previous generations, compelling innovation.
Rob Duke's insight:

Reducing crime is also about good urban planning that includes a healthy jobs-housing mix.

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Dalston's comment, July 16, 2:02 AM
It's about time they did something like this sense our country is making things worse for millennials in more ways than one. The least people can start doing is make living easier. Finding a job to do so is hard enough.
Rob Duke's comment, July 16, 2:13 AM
Yeah, no kidding. When my wife and I got married in the mid-1980's she made $12 hr. and I made $8 hr. and we were able to buy a house for $87k. Today, wages are about the same and homes are 3 to 4 times that price. I don't know how young people can get a start....?
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LA County property owners urged to beware of deed scams, check assessor’s site –

LA County property owners urged to beware of deed scams, check assessor’s site – | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Fraudulent solicitations appear as though they’ve been mailed out by the assessor or another government agency.
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Devon Smale's comment, July 13, 6:26 PM
I had several scams sent to my house when I first purchased a home. Thankfully I was warned ahead of time by my loan officer that things like this would appear in the mail, so I avoided all things that were about my house that came from other places and if it seemed legit then I would simply call my home loan place and ask them about it. It is a shame that we cannot even own a home without someone trying to take advantage for their own financial gain.
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The Counterfeit Report | Press Release

The Counterfeit Report | Press Release | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Counterfeit Report
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Raymond N's comment, July 9, 6:31 AM
I found this report quite interesting. The corruption in the police system seems to be contributed by the counterfeiting of police badges.
Devon Smale's comment, July 13, 6:23 PM
I just spoke about Amazon and ebay in another article where they are selling counterfeit products. This seems scary to me and it makes you question the police even more now when a situation happens because how do you know that they are a real cop or detective if they can buy a fake badge online. Something needs to be done about this because it is not a good look for Amazon or eBay,
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Storm Lake Police Dept. video encourages immigrant residents to report crimes

Storm Lake Police Dept. video encourages immigrant residents to report crimes | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There's a growing concern about the fight against crime in one Northwest Iowa community. Fewer immigrants are reporting crime in Storm Lake because they're afraid of the police.This is largely because of current debates over immigration reform in Iowa and
Rob Duke's insight:

It's been interesting to watch Arizona's public policy.  Having been a Chief of Police in a few towns where we had a large immigrant population, the last thing I needed was for those immigrants to become even more dependent on the gangs and cartels.  By enforcing immigration laws, my department would have been creating bigger policing and governance problems.

For me, I think ICE should do ICE duties and local police should keep the peace and enforce the law equally for all residents-whether legal or illegal.

What are your thoughts?

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William Kelley's comment, July 1, 11:36 PM
Hopefully the negative view of law enforcement can be removed through the generations through positive interactions
Raymond N's comment, July 2, 2:29 AM
Due to the increase in negative outlooks of the police, may not only immigrants are afraid to report crime in fear of what may happen to them.
Dalston's comment, July 2, 4:17 AM
I hope the police can start making more efforts to not make themselves look like monsters. A lot of that is the media's fault, but police should make it known that they're not enemies and do want to help.
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Saudi Arabia turns against political Islam - Muslims but not brothers

Saudi Arabia turns against political Islam - Muslims but not brothers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

HOW TO OVERTURN God’s law? Or, rather, how to change what you had previously said was God’s law? This is the question facing Muhammad bin Salman as he loosens social restrictions. His conclusion? Blame it all on Iran. The crown prince says his country took a wrong turn in 1979. That was the year when Shia Islamists overthrew the Shah of Iran, Sunni extremists opposed to the Saudi monarchy stormed the Grand Mosque in Mecca and the Soviet army marched into Afghanistan.

Before that, so the story goes, Saudis could enjoy cinemas and concerts. Even in the time of Abdel Aziz Al Saud, the founder of the modern Saudi state, women worked in the fields and rode camels alone. But after 1979 Saudi kings, who call themselves custodians of the two holy mosques, resolved to outdo their foes, both Shia and Sunni, in Islamic piety.

The more relaxed social rules now being introduced are thus no heresy, says the crown prince; they are simply a return to a pre-existing normality. “Islam is moderate in its ways. It is unfortunate that extremism has hijacked this religion,” says Sheikh Mohammad Alissa, head of the Muslim World League, a body that has long spread ultra-puritanical ideology. It is a sign of the new times that, these days, it is busy making ecumenical contacts with Christians, Jews and others.

For Stephane Lacroix of the Sciences-Po university in Paris, the crown prince is building a myth: “Saudi Arabia’s religious authorities were extreme even before Ayatollah Khomeini ruled over Iran.” The difference, he says, is that after 1979 they were given free rein to impose their rules in corners of the kingdom from which they had previously been kept out, such as wealthy neighbourhoods of Riyadh. With the emergence of global jihad, Saudi rulers have struggled to avoid association with extremist groups such as al-Qaeda, the Taliban and Islamic State (IS), whose religious practices and doctrines resemble those of Saudi clerics except in when and where to resort to political violence.

How can Saudi authorities distance Wahhabism from jihadism? One argument is semantic. They deny that there is any such thing as Wahhabism; what they practice, they say, is plain Islam as it existed among the salaf, the generation of the Prophet and his companions (thus they accept “salafism”). A second defence is doctrinal. Real salafism is quiet and non-political, they say. “It dictates that we should obey and hear the ruler,” says Sheikh Mohammad. A third contention is that, if salafists have become rebellious, that is because they have been infected by the ideas of the Muslim Brotherhood. Founded in Egypt in 1928 during the agitation against British rule, the Brotherhood has inspired political Islam across the Arab world under different names, and with various degrees of militancy—from Ennahdha, the “Muslim democrats” of Tunisia, to Hamas, the armed Palestinian movement that rules Gaza.

Brothers are often less puritanical in Islamic practices than salafists but, because they permit rebellion against impious rulers, they are regarded as more subversive. Still, early on the Brothers enjoyed good relations with Gulf rulers, who thought them useful against nationalists and leftists. But after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, when part of the Brotherhood supported Saddam Hussein, the Islamists were regarded with greater suspicion. In many Arab countries the Brothers established themselves by providing social services for the poor. In the rich Gulf, the Brotherhood developed a form of “rentier Islamism” in which opposition was based on religious issues, says Courtney Freer of the London School of Economics. “Islamists have not tended to focus on economic policy,” she argues. “Theirs is a moralising agenda. For them, governments have to prove that they are guardians of the morality of the nation.”

Muhammad bin Zayed of Abu Dhabi, the main power in the United Arab Emirates, regards the Brothers as a menace. The UAE has arrested scores of their activists. Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad of Qatar, by contrast, has been a principal sponsor of the Brotherhood (see next article). Under Muhammad bin Salman, the hitherto ambiguous Saudis now side with the Emiratis. He speaks of a “triangle of evil” encompassing Iran, IS and the Muslim Brotherhood. As such he seems to be drawing a dividing line between Arab states (and tame salafists) on one side, and all forms of Islamism on the other—be they non-violent Brothers or jihadists. “It is a crazy analysis about the threat of a pan-Islamic empire,” says Jamal Khashoggi, a former editor of al-Watan, a Saudi-owned newspaper, who now works as a columnist in exile in America. “He treats IS and the Brotherhood as the same thing—the only difference being that IS tried to create the caliphate immediately by violence while the Brotherhood wants to create the caliphate slowly, through democracy.”

Although the Brotherhood never seemed very strong in the Gulf, its election victory in Egypt in 2012 unnerved Gulf rulers. Saudi Arabia and the UAE enthusiastically supported the coup that overthrew President Muhammad Morsi of the Brotherhood, not least because he was moving closer to Iran. For Mr Khashoggi, the campaign against the Brothers is an attempt to extinguish the last embers of the Arab spring: “Democracy and political Islam go together.”

The Saudi push for “moderate Islam” may have one paradoxical boon. Many Shias hope it will quieten the worst anti-Shia utterances of Wahhabi clerics. Shias form substantial minorities across the Gulf (see chart). Many of them live over the richest oilfields. So episodes of Shia rebelliousness carry not just the fear of separatism, or of Iranian interference, but of economic disaster, too.

To varying degrees, Shias feel discriminated against across the GCC. They are often the downtrodden “other”, regarded as a fifth column for Iran if not as outright infidels. During the Arab spring in 2011, many Shias took to the streets to demand greater freedom. The worst unrest took place in Bahrain, where Sunni rulers crushed protests by the majority-Shia population.

In Saudi Arabia, protests broke out in the Qatif region. Repression set off a spiral of bloodshed, and armed clashes in Awamiyah, home to a radical preacher, Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed in 2016. The unrest has been quelled and the town centre bulldozed. Prince Muhammad now seeks to distinguish between Shias and Iran. But resentment runs deep. “The people who took up arms were criminal,” says one local Shia activist, “but the Saudi government is even more criminal.”

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America has reason to remember its consumer protection tradition when it comes to privacy

America has reason to remember its consumer protection tradition when it comes to privacy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
People should demand more than scattershot bills that make headlines for a day or two and then disappear into the ether.
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Michael Annunziato's comment, June 29, 12:07 AM
This is a terrific article. It details how social media has become a massive part of our everyday lives. Social media outlets will continue to use and abuse personal information for monetary gain whenever they can. This is basically how they make their billions and billions. The sad truth is that the vast majority of the users of twitter and facebook know full well that their information can and often is used to make these media firms money and continue to use them without pause. I'd be willing to bet that over 95% of twitter and facebook users never read the privacy statements that they agree to when setting up accounts on these outlets. They don't realize that these companies are telling you that they will use your personal inforamtion without your consent whenever they wish and we agree to it willingly and then act outraged when it happens.
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Trump signs bill giving cities, states $50M to combat gang activity

Trump signs bill giving cities, states $50M to combat gang activity | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Local and state governments and law enforcement agencies will see a boost in funding to fight gang activity after President Donald Trump signed into law a bill creating a $50 million grant program. Law enforcement officials and leaders of anti-gang program
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Michael Annunziato's comment, June 29, 12:15 AM
This is a very big and much needed step in the right direction when it comes to fighting gangs and gang violence. It shows that President Trump is not going to stand idly by while our nation’s inner cities are being overrun by violent gangs and illegal immigrant criminals that enter our country illegally and then populate this blood thirsty gangs like MS-13. Mr. Trump is a native New York and I’m sure he knows all about gangs like MS-13 because they have been terrorizing New York City and Long Island for decades without any fully funded major law enforcement task forces being dedicated to stopping them. I applaud the President as a native New Yorker and as someone that believes the rule of law is what makes this country great.
Raymond N's comment, July 2, 2:44 AM
I am a little on the fence with this funding decision. We cut funding from schools, but give more to policing gang activities. If funding were kept in schools, then there would be more incentives for children to stay in school instead of turning to the gang life.
Dalston's comment, July 2, 4:14 AM
I really hate this man. I just know this is race driven like everything else he does. No one is concerned about gangs right now, we want these children back with their parents and for people of color to not have to worry about the police being called on them for nonsense.
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Gosport Hospital drugs policy killed 456 patients, report finds. Now families want justice.

Gosport Hospital drugs policy killed 456 patients, report finds. Now families want justice. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The relatives of more than 450 patients who died after being over-prescribed drugs while in hospital have called for the British government to accept culpability for their deaths.
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Tesla sues ex-employee for hacking and theft. But he says he's a whistleblower

Tesla sues ex-employee for hacking and theft. But he says he's a whistleblower | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Tesla sues ex-employee accused of hacking its computers and stealing data, but he says he's a whistleblower, not a hacker.
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Travante williams's comment, June 25, 8:25 PM
Does society really care for a whistle blower? I'd say not initially, then the masses are enlightened of the predicted accusations and prove the person to be telling the truth. Its unfortunate, but if you dont reach the right ears, you may never be heard. This looks like a move to hush this employee up for ever, its definitely not about the money.