Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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Police Deploy Armored Vehicles Tear Gas Against Paris Protesters, Detain Hundreds : NPR

Police Deploy Armored Vehicles Tear Gas Against Paris Protesters, Detain Hundreds : NPR | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Protesters took to the streets of the French capital on Saturday in the fourth demonstration since unrest began in November.
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David's comment, December 8, 4:12 PM
President of France needs to understand that if if he does not compromise with the people and society, then we can expect a drop in his reputation and support of the people as a wholeю
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Anger over video of French police surrounding kneeling teenage protesters | Euronews

Anger over video of French police surrounding kneeling teenage protesters | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A video showing police overlooking student protesters on their knees and with their hands behind their heads has sparked a lot of angry reaction in France.
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David's comment, December 8, 4:25 PM
There are peaceful demonstrations and there are violent demonstrations. what did the students expected when they destroy shopwindows, vehicles and roads? If students want meetings then it has to be safe for the community and law enforcements.
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Is Rome on course for 'world's ugliest Christmas tree' for second consecutive year? | Euronews

Is Rome on course for 'world's ugliest Christmas tree' for second consecutive year? | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Romans are not pleased with this year's Christmas tree, which arrived in the city on Monday, as locals say they are experiencing de ja vu of the 'ugliest Christmas tree' of yesteryear
Rob Duke's insight:

Just because...

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Murder on American Indian land? Supreme Court weighs fate of convicted killer, tribal reservation borders

Patrick Murphy, a Creek Nation member, wants his murder conviction thrown out because the ditch where he left a tribal citizen was not subject to state criminal law.
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Martha Hood's comment, December 9, 10:30 PM
I think that the United States should respect Tribal Sovereignty, but I highly doubt that that will happen. If it does, this man has been found guilty before and he would probably be found guilty again, and he would be spared the death penalty which is inhumane. We forced the indigenous population to Oklahoma, the least we can do is respect their land boundaries, even if they were unofficially disbanded.
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‘The Numbers Are So Staggering.’ Overdose Deaths Set a Record Last Year. - The New York Times

‘The Numbers Are So Staggering.’ Overdose Deaths Set a Record Last Year. - The New York Times | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The opioid epidemic has contributed to reductions in American life expectancy over the last three years, a pattern not seen since World War II, new data show.
Rob Duke's insight:

Portugal had 27 overdose deaths last year....shouldn't we be asking what they're doing?

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David's comment, December 4, 1:31 PM
US officials need to find the root of origin of this drug and punish severely those who distribute them. Otherwise the problem will be worsen every year.
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Overworked South Koreans are finding solace in a fake prison —

Overworked South Koreans are finding solace in a fake prison — | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“This prison gives me a sense of freedom.”
Rob Duke's insight:

This gives new meaning to the idea of a "stay-cation"....

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David's comment, December 4, 1:20 PM
The problem is that in big cities it’s fussy, although a person sometimes needs peaceful and quiet places to think about their lives.
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Deutsche Bank headquarters raided over money laundering

Deutsche Bank headquarters raided over money laundering | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Frankfurt headquarters of Deutsche Bank have been raided by prosecutors in a money laundering investigation.

Germany's public prosecutor alleged that two staff members have helped clients launder money from criminal activities.

Police cars were seen outside the tower blocks that house the headquarters of Germany's biggest bank.

Five other Deutsche offices in the city were searched in an operation involving about 170 police and officials.

Prosecutors are looking into whether Deutsche Bank staff helped clients set up offshore accounts to "transfer money from criminal activities".

The investigation, which began in August, focuses on activities between 2013 and the start of 2018.

In 2016 alone, more than 900 customers were served by a Deutsche Bank subsidiary registered in the British Virgin Islands, generating a volume of €311m, the prosecutors allege.

The investigation was sparked by revelations in the 2016 "Panama Papers" - an enormous amount of information leaked from a Panamanian law firm called Mossack Fonseca.
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Mafia villas in Rome demolished in effort to rout organised crime from city | Euronews

Mafia villas in Rome demolished in effort to rout organised crime from city | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The demolition of several Mafia villas around Italy went off with all the bravado one might expect.

Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, on a break from his governmental work, was at the scene riding a bulldozer, metaphorising his no-holds-barred fight against organised crime.



The demolitions began last week when eight homes built illegally by the Casamonica mafia clan - a prolific family in the Italian crime underworld renowned for its violence and gaudy lifestyle - were brought down.

The group, which has ethnic Roma roots, reportedly runs drugs, fraud and extortion rings in the Italian capital.

Salvini, whose hard-right League party is vehemently anti-immigrant and who has courted controversy with his plans to carry out a census of Italy's Roma population, hailed the demolitions as a great success.

Mayor of Rome Virginia Raggi said the villas demolished last week violated Rome's construction and landscape laws and some "incorporated whole sections of the historic Felice Aqueduct".

She said: "Today is an historic day for the city of Rome and for Romans. We are putting an end to years of illegality and are sending a strong statement to the Casamonica clan."

Those evicted in last week's demolitions said they had been given no prior warning and that they had been left with nowhere to take their children.

On Monday, in between meetings with Italian Prime Minister to discuss the country's budget plans following warnings from the EU, Salvini took a moment out of his busy schedule to oversee the demolition of the largest villa.

Some consider his involvement in this venture against the Casamonica clan as a bid for popularity, others a legal ploy for his 'persecution' of the Romani.
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Nissan’s old guard struck back against their ‘gaijin’ saviour, and Japan Inc may be the worse for it

Nissan’s old guard struck back against their ‘gaijin’ saviour, and Japan Inc may be the worse for it | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The narrative spun by Nissan and apparently condoned by Japanese authorities is that the former high-flying head of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi Motor alliance abused his position to enrich himself.

The truth appears to be rather different and it seems certain to come out as “L’Affaire Ghosn” unfolds. It threatens to do at least as much damage to the reputation of the government and industry alliance known as Japan Inc as to the man at the centre of the affair.

It has been said that Ghosn had become a national hero in Japan before he fell from grace. But that is next to impossible. No one can really be a hero in Japan unless they are of Japanese origin and, as the Japanese say, the “nail that sticks up gets knocked down.”

Ghosn is of Lebanese, French and Brazilian extraction, the kind of exotic mixture that sometimes produces outstanding people. In Japan, he is first and foremost a gaijin (foreigner) and the Japanese corporate world is not comfortable having foreigners show then how to do things.
Rob Duke's insight:

More info comes out....

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Will smuggled files lead to justice for the Assad regime's victims? - The documents men

Will smuggled files lead to justice for the Assad regime's victims? - The documents men | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This month France said it had issued international arrest warrants for three Syrian officials, including Ali Mamlouk, Mr Assad’s security adviser, and Jamil Hassan, the air force intelligence chief. These resulted from a case involving two French-Syrians who were arrested in Syria in 2013 and disappeared. Germany, which claims universal jurisdiction over war crimes, meaning it can prosecute offences committed abroad, has also issued a warrant for Mr Hassan, who is accused of ordering the torture and murder of detainees.

Both investigations relied on tens of thousands of pictures taken by a photographer, known as Caesar, working for the Syrian military police. He smuggled them out of his office on usb drives hidden in his shoes. The photos (one is pictured) show thousands of corpses of Syrian detainees, many bearing signs of torture and murder.

Caesar worked with Syrian opposition groups. Other Syrians are working with the Commission for International Justice and Accountability (cija), an ngo set up by Bill Wiley, a Canadian war-crimes investigator. cija receives money from Western governments and has a secret headquarters in Europe, where it stores over 800,000 documents (including some that incriminate Syrian opposition groups). Its files are being used by the family of Marie Colvin, which is suing the Assad regime in America. They are said to show that Colvin, a journalist killed in Syria in 2012, was targeted by the regime.

cija has built cases against dozens of officials. A un body is slowly bringing smuggled documents and other evidence under one roof for use by prosecutors. But the pursuit of justice on a grand scale has been blocked by China and Russia, which have vetoed attempts by the un Security Council to refer the Assad regime to the International Criminal Court. Even in countries that have issued warrants, trials are unlikely. Syrian officials would have to be foolish enough to travel to a country willing to arrest them.

More documents await collection, hidden in homes, caves and pits inside Syria. But with Mr Assad on the verge of winning the war, some countries are normalising relations with his regime. Mr Mamlouk visited Italy in January to meet officials. Despite all the evidence, Mr Assad and his henchmen may never face justice.

This article appeared in the Middle East and Africa section of the print edition under the headline "The documents men"
Rob Duke's insight:

Some insight into other methods of international prosecution.

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David's comment, December 4, 2:11 PM
Im sorry, but its kinda silly they say"teacher broke into government intelligence and stole thousands of documents".
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How one Indian city cracked the problem of urban spread - Sprawls well

How one Indian city cracked the problem of urban spread - Sprawls well | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Ahmedabad does things differently. Two municipal authorities—one for the central city, the other covering a much larger area around Ahmedabad—identify large blocks of land to develop. On the fringes of the city, they usually claim about two-fifths of the land area for roads, schools, parks, social housing and so on. Rather than claiming land only from farmers who happen to be in the path of roads, though, the authorities take the same proportion from everyone in the block.

Then, using a century-old town-planning law introduced by the British former rulers, Ahmedabad’s officials reorganise all land holdings in the block so that they align with the new road grid. Field boundaries that once curved and twisted become straight. The authorities pay farmers for the land that they seize, and charge them for infrastructure improvements. Usually, the land jumps so much in value that everybody comes out well ahead.

This process can be fraught, and is not entirely clean. Pankaj Patel, the man who bought land from Mr Shivaji, lists some of the many things that go wrong. To begin with, he says, people whom he calls “land grabbers” hear that an area is slated for development and try to snaffle as much as they can—sometimes by fibbing to the farmers by telling them that the government will seize their land and give them almost nothing. Everybody complains that their reorganised land parcels are less well situated than their neighbours’. Some bribe officials to give them a better deal. Rich, powerful people who own country estates in the targeted districts find various ways to gum up the works.

Not one of these problems is fatal, however. Whereas attempts to seize land under eminent-domain laws are frequently paralysed by protests, the town-planning schemes trundle along. Crucially, the development authorities can ban building along the paths of roads even while arguments rage over the new land parcels. The town-planning schemes have proved flexible. To acquire land for a 76km ring road, Ahmedabad created 47 schemes and built the road in just four years.

The result is a tidy city, which can become much larger before it begins to suffer from the usual diseconomies of scale. Usually, the fringes of developing-world cities are messier than the middles. But the Atlas of Urban Expansion, a project based in New York University, estimates that roads built in Ahmedabad after 2000 are 8.5m wide, on average, compared with 7.2m for roads built earlier. Roads also take up more of the land area in the newly developed suburbs. Because wide roads can carry more cars and buses, future suburbanites in Ahmedabad ought to be spared the awful traffic jams that frustrate large Indian cities such as Delhi and Mumbai.
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French court accepts ñ can be used in national language | Euronews

French court accepts ñ can be used in national language | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Once threatened with disappearance in order to simplify computer keyboards, the letter ñ has now been officially recognised in a second international language.

An appeals court in Brittany ruled that a couple could call their son Fañch, a diminutive of the common François, overturning an earlier decision that the name could not be officially registered because the letter did not exist in French.


Spanish is the only national language that includes the letter in its alphabet although it features in a number of regional languages, including celtic-derived Bretton, spoken in the northwest region of France.

The decision marks a victory for Breton speakers of Breton against centuries of attempts to standardise French to the detriment of their language.

However, the wider status of the ñ remains uncertain after an attempt by a local senator in March to introduce the letter into official documents in support of the family failed because ministers said there was no justification to add another letter to the alphabet.

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Teen loses driving license after 49 minutes

Teen loses driving license after 49 minutes | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A German teenager’s first joyride was fast and furious — until police pulled him over and took away his license. The 18-year-old driver lost his license after 49 minutes. “Some things hold for eternity ... some not even an hour,” German police said in statement on Tuesday. Police clocked him at 95 km/h (59mph) in a 50 km/h (31 mph) zone, in the Märkischer Kreis region of central north Germany. The teen, who had been driving with fou
Rob Duke's insight:

Harsh; for doing 59 in a 50 zone

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David's comment, December 4, 2:17 PM
Actually, going 59mph in a 31mph zone... Almost as twice the speed limit...What he should've done is going on outoban where there is no speed limit.
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American entrepreneurs who flocked to China are heading home disillusioned

American entrepreneurs who flocked to China are heading home disillusioned | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
For years, American entrepreneurs saw opportunities in China. But worsening costs, taxation, tech transfer and increased regulations are prompting foreign-owned businesses to throw in the towel.
Rob Duke's insight:

From week 1: countries must be: 1. strong enough to ensure survival; 2. practice a rule of law; and, 3. be accountable to the people.

China is the first, but lacks the other 2 attributes.

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David's comment, December 8, 4:19 PM
China have a mix government, communism with capitalism. They allow business to run and give favorable conditions for entrepreneurs.
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Carlos Ghosn, Nissan Motor to be indicted Monday: Nikkei | Reuters

Tokyo prosecutors plan to indict former Nissan Motor Co Ltd (7201.T) Chairman Carlos Ghosn on Monday for financial misconduct, the Nikkei business daily reported, ratcheting up their case against the auto tycoon.

Prosecutors also plan to indict on the same day former representative director Greg Kelly as well as the automaker itself, the Nikkei said on Friday, citing unidentified sources.

The Nov. 19 arrest of Ghosn and Kelly shook the foundations of the Renault-Nissan alliance and stunned the auto industry, where Ghosn is renowned for turning around the French and Japanese carmakers. Ghosn remains chairman and chief executive of Renault SA (RENA.PA).

Ghosn and Kelly’s detention period runs until Monday, when prosecutors must decide to indict, release, or rearrest them on new claims.

The Nikkei said the two former executives and Nissan would likely be indicted over the alleged underreporting of salaries in five annual reports through the business year that ended in March 2015.

Ghosn and Kelly are also likely to be rearrested on suspicion of making misstatements in reports for the subsequent three business years, the newspaper reported.

The Nikkei said making false statements in an annual report was a crime for which not just the individuals involved but also companies can be held accountable, and prosecutors wanted to charge Nissan for not preventing the alleged crime.

Ghosn was arrested for allegedly conspiring to understate his income by about half of the actual 10 billion yen ($88.66 million) over five years from 2010. Kelly was accused of assisting.

Ghosn and Kelly have not made any statement through their lawyers, but Japanese media reported that they have denied the allegations.

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Burden Was on DUI Defendant to Show Blood Drawn in Unreasonable Manner

The Court of Appeal for this district yesterday reversed an order suppressing blood test results, holding that the prosecution had no burden of showing that a DUI suspect’s blood was drawn in a reasonable manner.

Acting Presiding Justice Kenneth Yegan of Div. Six wrote:

“Here, the question is who has the burden of proof on the ‘reasonable manner’ issue when a valid search warrant authorizes the blood draw. This is an issue of first impression in California. We hold that, where the circumstances of the blood draw are typical and routine, i.e., not peculiarly within the knowledge of the People, the burden of proof is on the defendant.”

Ventura Superior Court Judge Michael S. Lief had suppressed evidence of the alcohol content of motorist Edward Ryan Fish’s blood based on his perception that the prosecution had not shown that the test was performed in accordance with acceptable medical practices. The People appealed his order; the Appellate Division of the Ventura Superior Court affirmed; the Court of Appeal transferred the case to itself.

Evidence Code Cited

In explaining the reversal, Yegan pointed to Evidence Code §664, which provides:

“It is presumed that official duty has been regularly performed. This presumption does not apply on an issue as to the lawfulness of an arrest if it is found or otherwise established that the arrest was made without a warrant.”

The arresting officer was Michael Ramos, who testified at the suppression hearing. In light of §664, Yegan said, the court will “presume” that Ramos “oversaw the procedure to assure it was performed in a sanitary manner that did not involve pain or trauma” and will “presume” he made certain the blood was drawn by personnel licensed to perform that task.
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North Dakota’s Norway Experiment –

North Dakota’s Norway Experiment – | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Late one night in October 2015, North Dakota prisons chief Leann Bertsch met Karianne Jackson, one of her deputies, for a drink in a hotel bar in Oslo, Norway. They had just spent an exhausting day touring Halden, the maximum-security facility Time has dubbed “the world’s most humane prison,” yet neither of them could sleep. […]
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David's comment, December 4, 1:50 PM
Overall its a good idea of how community can overcome evil with good. However, we don't know exactly what are their thoughts. Inmates might act nice but we know that For out of the heart come evil thoughts—murder, adultery, sexual immorality, theft, false testimony, slander.
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Panama Papers Q&A: What is the scandal about?

Panama Papers Q&A: What is the scandal about? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A huge leak of documents has lifted the lid on how the rich and powerful use tax havens to hide their wealth: what is the scandal about?
Rob Duke's insight:

Some background on the "Panama Papers" mentioned in the article below....

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The most famous street in Paris became a blazing battleground. Here's why. | Euronews

The most famous street in Paris became a blazing battleground. Here's why. | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"The forgotten middle class" has taken to the country's streets. "They feel like the political elite is forgetting about them," one expert said.
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David's comment, December 4, 2:06 PM
Macron is not a good politician and diplomat. In order to raise the support of French people, he needs to use right approach. if he wants people to use less vehicles that produce more pollutions, he got to show people of how devastating pollutions might be by mass media.
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UAE Pardons British Man, Days After He Received Life Sentence For Spying : NPR

UAE Pardons British Man, Days After He Received Life Sentence For Spying : NPR | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Matthew Hedges spent months in solitary confinement and without access to a lawyer, according to his wife, Daniela Tejada. Today, she says, "I've been brought back to life."
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Gas tax protests turn violent in Paris

Gas tax protests turn violent in Paris | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a scene straight out of “Les Miserables,” 5,000 angry demonstrators set fires and stormed barricades Saturday in Paris along the famed Champs-Elysees to protest president Emmanuel Macron and the rising gas taxes in France.

Police used water cannons and tear gas to try to contain the melee as demonstrators burned plywood, stomped on barriers and wielded signs reading “Death to Taxes.” They overturned one vehicle.

Smoke and flames mixed with holiday lights lining the boulevard to create a surreal scene, as one protester jumped on a pile of debris and waved a French flag, the Arc de Triomphe looming behind him.

Police said they arrested dozens, many for throwing objects during the demonstration. Officials said 19 people were hurt, including four police officers, and one victim who sustained serious injuries.

“It’s going to trigger a civil war and me, like most other citizens, we’re all ready,” said Benjamin Vrignaud, a 21-year-old protester from Chartres.

“They take everything from us. They steal everything from us,” said Laura Cordonnier, 21.

Saturday was the eighth day of protest across France, involving more than 81,000 demonstrators. Two people have been killed in the clashes.
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Harm reduction is the right way to treat drug abuse - Chill pill

Harm reduction is the right way to treat drug abuse - Chill pill | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Europe should re-embrace an approach it pioneered
Nov 24th 2018 | LISBON AND AMSTERDAM

Twenty years ago Lisbon’s Casal Ventoso neighbourhood was the biggest open-air drug market in Europe. But since 2001, when Portugal decriminalised most drug use, the number of addicts has plummeted, and these days one has to know where to find them. One recent evening, three outreach workers from crescer, a charity that helps drug users, trudged up a hillside carrying bags of clean syringes, saline solution and pastries. In a grove of cane plants, half-a-dozen people were smoking crack or injecting heroin. A gaunt man leant over a friend’s face, helping him plunge a needle into his neck.

Marta Correia, a psychologist at crescer, is friendly with many of Casal Ventoso’s drug users, but the thin fellow was unfamiliar. “Call me John Doe,” he joked, grinning. He had been shooting heroin for 25 years, since he was 15, he said. Ms Correia gave him a pastry and some syringes, accepting used ones in return. Other users got sheets of tinfoil for their pipes, and were encouraged to enter treatment.

At the height of the epidemic in the 1990s, authorities estimated that about 100,000 Portuguese, or 1% of the population, were heroin users. “It cut across all social classes. Nearly every family had someone,” says Dr João Goulão, head of sicad, the agency that directs Portugal’s addiction programmes. That generated the political will to take the fight against drugs out of the justice ministry and give it to the health ministry. Under the law of 2001, illegal drugs remain illegal and dealers are prosecuted. But possession for personal use is an administrative offence, not a criminal one. Anyone caught with a 10-day supply or less is ordered to visit the local Commission for Dissuasion of Drug Addiction. Rehabilitation programmes and opiate substitutes, such as methadone, are available to all users who want to quit.

First, do no harm
Since then, the number of problem heroin users has fallen to about 33,000. The government can claim only partial credit; drug epidemics tend to fizzle. But decriminalisation and treatment helped cut Portugal’s overdose rate to one of the lowest in Europe. As for America, in 2016 it had 63,600 fatal overdoses. In Portugal there were 27.

Portugal’s policies are based on “harm reduction” approaches pioneered in countries such as Switzerland in the 1980s. The idea is to emphasise treatment and prevention more than punishment, says Brendan Hughes of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (emcdda). Most European countries now have some form of harm-reduction policy, though the east is more conservative.

Some countries take things further. Many have safe injection rooms, supervised by medical professionals who check the drugs for safety. In Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland, addicts who repeatedly fail methadone programmes may even receive free, government-prescribed heroin. “Heroin-assisted treatment” has been shown to reduce crime and deaths. And it appears not to recruit new users: shooting up at a government facility under a nurse’s gaze is hardly glamorous.

But lately Europe is facing different drugs. Cocaine use is up; in Barcelona, residues in wastewater suggest it more than doubled between 2011 and 2018. Most overdose deaths in the Netherlands are caused not by opiates but by party drugs like amphetamines or synthetic cannabinoids, or by ecstasy, which can cause dehydration. The drug ghb raises your libido, but can knock you out; it accounted for two-thirds of Dutch drug-related emergencies in 2016.

For stimulants like these, notes the emcdda’s Andrew Cunningham, “there are no substitute treatments like methadone”. The same goes for methamphetamines, rare in most of Europe but common in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. (They are still known there as “Pervitin”, a brand of amphetamines distributed to Nazi soldiers.) In the past few years Czech meth has spread across Germany, mainly in paste form. The more dangerous crystal variant has popped up as well, often sold at t-shirt stands along the German border.

Resistance to decriminalisation can come from many sides. Moralistic Sweden has tough laws against even small quantities of drugs. That is one reason, critics say, why its overdose death rate is the second-highest in Europe after Estonia’s: users are afraid to call for help. Poland has needle exchanges, but under its present conservative government, the number of syringes distributed mysteriously dropped by half in 2016. In Copenhagen last summer police repeatedly raided the anarchist community of Christiania, where cannabis dealing had long been unofficially tolerated.

Getting tough on cannabis seems strange at a time when countries and American states are legalising it. Harm reduction began with cannabis in the 1970s, when the Dutch government began tolerating retail reefer sales in designated “coffee shops”. But tellingly, it never decriminalised the business of supplying the coffee shops, so the wholesale trade stayed illegal. “It makes no sense at all,” says Peter Schouten, a Dutch lawyer who hopes to become one of the country’s first legitimate marijuana farmers when a pilot programme is launched next summer.

Many of Europe’s decriminalisation and harm-reduction efforts remain unfinished. Américo Nave, head of crescer, criticises Portugal’s government for failing to create safe injection rooms and barring outreach workers from carrying the drug naloxone, which can save heroin users who have overdosed. Last December, Ms Correia says, she watched a man die, knowing that naloxone might have saved him. Still, that is one of just a few dozen such deaths in Portugal in the past year. In Sweden, there may be ten times as many.

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Nissan board votes unanimously to oust Ghosn | Euronews

Nissan board votes unanimously to oust Ghosn | Euronews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nissan's board has ousted Chairman Carlos Ghosn following his shock arrest for alleged financial misconduct.
Rob Duke's insight:

Now, we'll see if charges get dropped....

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Is Carlos Ghosn's arrest a ‘hatchet job’?

The charges against the Brazilian-born French citizen were levelled thanks to the help of internal staff at Nissan, who made use of a new Japanese law guaranteeing immunity against prosecution for whistleblowers.

Mr Ghosn's future at Nissan - or lack thereof - is expected to be announced after the Tokyo stock market closes at 0600 GMT on Thursday.

Clarity over his future at Renault and the fate of the alliance he almost single-handedly created may take considerably longer.
Rob Duke's insight:

Did Nissan use the police and judiciary to rid itself of an unpopular French CEO?  Time will tell....

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