Credit terms
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Brandon Harper
Scoop.it!

Behavioral Finance in Financial Counseling: Blunders and "Whys"

This session features common problematic financial behaviors that arise in the remedial financial counseling setting, illustrated and analyzed through the cr...
Brandon Harper's insight:

Financial counseling

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brandon Harper
Scoop.it!

New York City Financial Empowerment Centers: Free One-on-One Financial Counseling

Learn how Consumer Affairs and the City's free Financial Empowerment Centers can help you take control of your finances.
Brandon Harper's insight:

Financial counseling

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brandon Harper
Scoop.it!

Five Common Problems of Debt Management for Commercial Real Estate Investors (Part 2 of 2)

Five Common Problems of Debt Management for Commercial Real Estate Investors (Part 2 of 2) | Credit terms | Scoop.it
Andy Birch, head of business development discusses the five common problems of debt management for commercial real estate investors
Brandon Harper's insight:

Debt problems

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brandon Harper
Scoop.it!

Financial Counseling Eliminate Debt attended Dave Ramsey Coach Training

Are you looking for Financial Counseling to help you eliminate debt?Our coaches have attended Dave Ramsey* Financial Coach Master Training. *Completion of Da...
Brandon Harper's insight:

Financial counseling

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brandon Harper
Scoop.it!

Stolen Identity | Steve Forbert (Live in Buffalo, NY)

Recorded live in Buffalo, NY on December 29, 2013 -- Steve Forbert performs "Stolen Identity" solo acoustic.
Brandon Harper's insight:

What do you do if your identity is stolen?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Brandon Harper from Breast Cancer News
Scoop.it!

Sign In

Sign In | Credit terms | Scoop.it

"Much has been written about the relationship between high medical expenses and the likelihood of filing for bankruptcy, but the relationship between receiving a cancer diagnosis and filing for bankruptcy is less well understood. We estimated the incidence and relative risk of bankruptcy for people age twenty-one or older diagnosed with cancer compared to people the same age without cancer by conducting a retrospective cohort analysis that used a variety of medical, personal, legal, and bankruptcy sources covering the Western District of Washington State in US Bankruptcy Court for the period 1995–2009. We found that cancer patients were 2.65 times more likely to go bankrupt than people without cancer. Younger cancer patients had 2–5 times higher rates of bankruptcy than cancer patients age sixty-five or older, which indicates that Medicare and Social Security may mitigate bankruptcy risk for the older group. The findings suggest that employers and governments may have a policy role to play in creating programs and incentives that could help people cover expenses in the first year following a cancer diagnosis.

Cost Of Health CareHealth Economics

The financial burden of cancer can be substantial for patients and their families. Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey suggest that $1.3 billion (6.5 percent) of the $20.1 billion spent on cancer care in the nonelderly population each year comes directly from the patients themselves.1 Deductibles and copayments for cancer treatments, supportive care, and related services, along with nonmedical costs such as child care and lost income, may be financially devastating, even for cancer patients with medical insurance.2"


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
Brandon Harper's insight:

Bankruptcy

more...
Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:15 AM

"Conclusion:

This study found strong evidence of a link between cancer diagnosis and increased risk of bankruptcy. Although the risk of bankruptcy for cancer patients is relatively low in absolute terms, bankruptcy represents an extreme manifestation of what is probably a larger picture of economic hardship for cancer patients. Our study thus raises important questions about the factors underlying the relationship between cancer and financial hardship.

Future studies that include information on patients’ financial and insurance status at the time of diagnosis and throughout their treatment will be needed to fully understand the relationship among cancer, financial difficulties, and bankruptcy. Also important is the impact of cancer on the patient’s ability to remain employed, since most health insurance is obtained through the workplace.24 These factors are particularly important in younger working-age populations, in which employment, income, insurance status, and personal assets vary greatly.

We believe that cancer care facilities and oncology practitioners should assess the financial health of their patients as a matter of course. Because temporary inability to work is often unavoidable during therapy, patients and their families should be encouraged to make financial preparations to the greatest extent possible. More generally, this study underlines the importance for cancer care providers of carefully considering the use of services that have limited evidence of substantial benefit and potential high out-of-pocket costs.

As a policy issue, there may be a role for employers and governments in creating programs or incentives to reduce the likelihood of financial insolvency, given that bankruptcies are “lose-lose” events for debtors and creditors alike. An example would be tax incentives to encourage employers to provide supplemental insurance policies with fixed sums to cover household and out-of-pocket expenses in the first year following a cancer diagnosis.

Finally, future studies of cancer patients who declare bankruptcy should examine the impact of this event on their cancer-related outcomes and later ability to obtain health insurance and access to health care.