Creativity and learning
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Creativity and learning
A mish-mash of items on learning, creativity, innovation and design education
Curated by Clive Hilton
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The 7 Styles of Online Learning

The 7 Styles of Online Learning | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Visual, aural, verbal, physical, logical, social, solitary. As an online educator, teacher, consultant, facilitator you probably wonder what kind of the 7 styles of learning are the most effective for your audience. Here's an overview. 

Clive Hilton's insight:

Personally, I'm a little sceptical about learning styles. While I can see how some ways of learning resonate more than others with the learners themselves, I've never really understood how that translates into something I have to accomodate as a pedagogue. I know of no teacher who can tailor approaches to meet the individual needs of a disparate learning style cohort of students. Still, that's just my view...

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Kathy Jordan's curator insight, January 14, 2013 5:51 PM

If you believe in distinctive learning styles, it's a challenge to figure out how to appeal to all of them in an online learning environment...

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What 4,500 Professors and Administrators Think About Online Learning

What 4,500 Professors and Administrators Think About Online Learning | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Three important takeaways about the current state of this growing trend.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Clive Hilton's insight:

No surprise then! HE administrators are excited by the cash-cow prospects for online learning while academics fear the worst.

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RDF: Global Free Higher Education

RDF: Global Free Higher Education | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

"It is possible to have free higher education (with many other improvements in the civic enterprise).  We do not have to suffer under the current system of institutions (universities/colleges), governments (federal/state or province) and unions (national/local) that is itself not sustainable - certainly not reproducible on a scale required by developing regions like India and China."

Clive Hilton's insight:

Beyond the mildly zealous tone, there are some interesting thoughts here. Not least, the irreplaceable value of a good teacher.

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Can You Measure an Education? Can You Define Life’s Meaning?

Can You Measure an Education? Can You Define Life’s Meaning? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
It's time to step back and think deeply about the purpose of education.
Clive Hilton's insight:

As a pedagogue myself, I've long harboured a suspicion that assembly-line learning - and worse, assembly-line learning measurement - may be doing significant harm. Just like assembly-line mass production, it's cheap, it can be dumbed down, and the end result is standardised, common denominator conformity. Free thinkers need not apply.

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University leaders protest at 'disastrous neglect' of postgraduates

University leaders protest at 'disastrous neglect' of postgraduates | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Complaint comes as research councils revealed to have withdrawn from supporting taught master's degrees
Clive Hilton's insight:

Time for institutions to put their money where their mouths are, methinks.

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Saul Bass’ Advice for Designers: Learn to Draw, and Create Beauty Even If Nobody Else Cares

Saul Bass’ Advice for Designers: Learn to Draw, and Create Beauty Even If Nobody Else Cares | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
It comes as no surprise that the man who created the title sequences for The Man with the Golden Arm, North by Northwest, Psycho, and Vertigo can tell you a thing or two about graphic design.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Wise words and no shying away from Saul's underlying message that drawing is at the core of the designer's craft.

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The Science of Productivity

The Science of Productivity. If you can stop procrastinating...
Clive Hilton's insight:

Ironically, I found this while finding ways of avoiding some necessary jobs that were perilously close to terminal deadline.

 

No hope for me then.

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How bio-inspired deep learning keeps winning competitions | KurzweilAI

How bio-inspired deep learning keeps winning competitions | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Dr. Jürgen Schmidhuber is Director of the Swiss Artificial Intelligence Lab, IDSIA. His research team’s artificial neural networks (NNs) have won many international awards, and recently were the first to achieve human-competitive performance on various benchmark data sets.
Clive Hilton's insight:

These NNs are of great practical relevance, because computer vision and pattern recognition are becoming essential for thousands of commercial applications. For example, the future of search engines lies in image and video recognition, as opposed to traditional text search. The most important applications may be in medical imaging, e.g., for automated melanoma detection, cancer prognosis, plaque detection in CT heart scans (to prevent strokes), and hundreds of other health-related areas.

 

In the not-so-distant future you should be able to point your cell phone camera to text in a foreign language, and get a translation.

 

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Online Learning: a Manifesto | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY

Online Learning: a Manifesto | Online Learning | HYBRID PEDAGOGY | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Online Learning: a Manifesto

December 03, 2012 | Filed in: Online Learning

by Jesse Stommel

 

Online learning is not the whipping boy of higher education. As a classroom teacher first and foremost, I have no interest in proselytizing for online learning, but to roundly condemn it is absurd. Online learning is too big and variable a target. It would be like roundly condemning the internet or all objects made from paper.

 

Much of the rhetoric currently being used against MOOCs is the same rhetoric that has been used against online learning since the 90s (and against distance education since the mid-1800s). There are important questions to be asked, such as how do MOOCs change the business models of higher education, or how do we maintain online the intimate and tailored experiences some of us create in the classroom, but these are not new questions. What I find exciting aboutthe rise of the MOOC is that it brings with it a new level of investment in discussions of online learning. This isn't to say that MOOCs are necessarily good or bad (they are, in fact, a lot of different things, depending on the MOOC), but to get lost entirely in the stories being told about MOOCs is to miss the forest for the trees, so to speak.

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Introduction to Inforgraphics and Data Visualization, January 2013 | Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas

Introduction to Inforgraphics and Data Visualization, January 2013...

 

Registration is now open for the Knight Center's second MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). The course will formally begin on January 12, 2013 through February 23, 2013. Below are course details and how to register. The introductory area of the course is now available to enrolled students. The introductory area includes access to the course syllabus and the introductory overview video for the course.

Course Dates:

Saturday, January 12, 2013 - Saturday, February 23, 2013

Instructor:

Alberto Cairo

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The Growing Competition for Students: Online Schools Storm the Ivory Tower

The Growing Competition for Students: Online Schools Storm the Ivory Tower | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Students today are looking for ways to sidestep the high costs and inconvenience of attending a brick and mortar schools. Estelle Shumann discusses factors to bear in mind as students seek meaningful education on the Internet.

 

One of the biggest concerns educators have is that the online space, while certainly convenient, may not be effective for every student. “Studies have shown that student success—in particular, retention rates—in many online courses is significantly lower than in similar traditional face-to-face courses,” a 2008 report in the Virginia Community College publication Inquirysaid. The online format makes it easy for students to essentially “fall off the grid,” the report said, and encouraged a resurgence of online training and active mentorship to encourage students to get the most out of the material presented.

 

Even students who are successful—that is, who complete the courses with good grades and come away with substantial knowledge of the subject area—may not be receiving quite the same education as their classroom-based peers when it comes to socialization, which is concerning to some. A college degree “is an educational experience rather than a training course,” the Financial Times said in a 2012 survey of online learning. “Accessing and digesting content is only one aspect of the programme. Reflecting, communicating, engaging and collaborating with a network of academics and peers are equally important.”

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Collective Intelligence | Conversation | Edge

Collective Intelligence | Conversation | Edge | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

As all the people and computers on our planet get more and more closely connected, it's becoming increasingly useful to think of all the people and computers on the planet as a kind of global brain.

 

THOMAS W. MALONE is the Patrick J. McGovern Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the founding director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence.

 

He was also the founding director of the MIT Center for Coordination Science and one of the two founding co-directors of the MIT Initiative on "Inventing the Organizations of the 21st Century".

 

It's important to realize that intelligence is not just something that happens inside individual brains. It also arises with groups of individuals. In fact, I'd define collective intelligence as groups of individuals acting collectively in ways that seem intelligent. By that definition, of course, collective intelligence has been around for a very long time. Families, companies, countries, and armies: those are all examples of groups of people working together in ways that at least sometimes seem intelligent.

 

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Technology Is Useless If It Doesn’t Address A Human Need

Technology Is Useless If It Doesn’t Address A Human Need | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The power of Silicon Valley is evident in almost everything we do. But is the drastic change that technology has wrought on modern life having an effect on the world of social entrepreneurship?

 

How can our illiterate and semi-literate grandmothers use technology to tell the stories of their ongoing transformation once they return home? How can we help them communicate, measure, and evaluate their success? A challenge, indeed, but one crucial to our ensuring sustainability and full-scaling the “Barefoot Approach.”

I’m sharing this story because simply participating in the Lab was “potentially disruptive.” What we learned through the four-month process, which ended in a week of identifying and pitching a solution, went far beyond our expectations. It did not disrupt our focus, as we thought it might. It taught us a new thought process for analysis of challenges. I went into the process thinking we had no limits to our creativity and resourcefulness, but realizing our information deficit in and of itself, was a limitation.

 

Silicon Valley expanded our learnings around innovative process. We learned what key-placed resources can catalyze within an organization, essential to maximizing and leveraging them to drive more significant change.

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How to design breakthrough inventions

How to design breakthrough inventions | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Global firm IDEO incorporates human behavior into product design -- an innovative approach being taught at Stanford. Charlie Rose profiles the company's founder, David Kelley.
Clive Hilton's insight:

A question I'm often asked by students goes along the lines of, 'well, how DO you innovate?'.

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Online Universities: Why They Still Don't Measure Up

Online Universities: Why They Still Don't Measure Up | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
"I hate to sound like a snob, but call me back when Harvard Business School offers an online MBA."

 

Academia is not like the business world, in which an online startup can trounce an established business by building in the cloud and delivering commodity goods with less overhead. Reputation and consistency matter when building trust in hard-to-quantify-results. Ironically, innovation, lower costs, inclusion and reduced barriers to entry can actually hurt the prestige of online schools. One of the key functions of a selective college is to do some pre-sorting of applicants: "if you got into Yale you must be smart." Giant online schools that accept pretty much everyone may be democratizing education, but they're not helping employers or anyone else separate out the best and the brightest.

Clive Hilton's insight:

While the article is overwhelmingly USA focussed, there are salient points in here that are worth reviewing.

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RSA Animate - The Power of Outrospection

Introspection is out, and outrospection is in. Philosopher and author Roman Krznaric explains how we can help drive social change by stepping outside ourselv...
Clive Hilton's insight:

As a techinque, these animated RSA videos are becoming much emulated these days, but there's no doubting that the originals are still among the best. This one explores the value of empathically considering the needs of others in a process Krznaric calls, outrospection. Powerful in places.

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Finally, EdTech That’s Based On Real Research « Annie Murphy Paul

Finally, EdTech That’s Based On Real Research « Annie Murphy Paul | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Imagine you’re walking down the street when your phone buzzes. “What is the capital of Maryland?” it asks you. You know the answer but you can’t quite grasp it until all of a sudden you remember: “Annapolis.” The question prompted your brain just in time.

That is the scenario envisaged by the makers of software Cerego, which launched last week, writes Hal Hodson in New Scientist:

 

“It uses a basic principle of cognitive science called ‘spaced repetition’ to improve learning. To remember something long term, a student must return to it several times, increasing the interval between each revision. The concept isn’t new, but Cerego aims to harness the idea to let people learn anytime, anywhere.

Clive Hilton's insight:

As the article declares; it's not new and it's not original, but it might be useful.

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Lori Pirog's comment, January 8, 2013 12:59 PM
As a boomer who has struggled with memory issues my entire life, I may just give a program like this a try. Despite using the technique of repetitive learning for many years now I still seem to struggle more than the average person. I would give a lot to understand why.
Clive Hilton's comment, January 10, 2013 4:56 AM
It's intriguing isn't it, Lori. I was recently bought a book by my other-half on improving memory. I took it as a hint, but fear that my alleged poor memory is simply a symptom of lifestyle overload.
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Study: School Design Can Significantly Affect Children's Grades | Wired Design | Wired.com

Study: School Design Can Significantly Affect Children's Grades | Wired Design | Wired.com | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
A study of school design has discovered that school layouts can influence a child's development by as much as 25 percent — positively or negatively — over the course of an academic year.
Clive Hilton's insight:

This seems to be a case of common sense stating the blindingly obvious, but the implications are important. And then the politicians get involved...

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Research debunks the ‘IQ myth’ | KurzweilAI

Research debunks the ‘IQ myth’ | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The monkey ladder cognitive test (credit: Adam Hampshire et al./Western University) After conducting the largest online intelligence study on record, with
Clive Hilton's insight:

As someone who's always been sceptical of the worth attached to traditional IQ tests, I find the results of this piece of research by  Canadian Western University particularly interesting. In short; there is no one single standardised test that is capable of reliably measuring IQ.

 

Further - perhaps contentiously - the report goes on to suggest that "regular brain training didn't help people's cognitive performance at all...".

 

And that ageing has a profound negative effect on both memory and reasoning abilities.

 

Oh well...

 

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Clive Hilton's comment, January 4, 2013 7:19 AM
I think you are right, Lori, and I completely concur with your premise that creativity is symptomatic of a intelligence and high order cognitive processes.
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UK universities in online launch

UK universities in online launch | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
A partnership of UK universities is launching an online project offering access to higher education courses via computers, mobiles or tablets.
Clive Hilton's insight:

MOOCs - Bandwagon jumping-on with no clear idea of strategic purpose from UK universities? Seems so.

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Marilyn Monroe Explains Relativity to Albert Einstein (in a Nicolas Roeg Movie)

Marilyn Monroe Explains Relativity to Albert Einstein (in a Nicolas Roeg Movie) | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
A certain motion picture has as its main characters Joe DiMaggio, Joseph McCarthy, Albert Einstein, and Marilyn Monroe.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Fabulous take on the purported relationship between Einstein and Monroe in which she explains to him the specific theory of relativity. If only theory was as much fun...

 

From the 1985 film, 'Insignificance', by Nicolas Roeg.

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Clive Hilton's comment, January 4, 2013 7:21 AM
Me too!
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The Human Face of Big Data | KurzweilAI

The Human Face of Big Data | KurzweilAI | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

The images and stories captured in The Human Face of Big Data are the result of an extraordinary artistic, technical, and logistical juggling act aimed at capturing the human face of the Big Data Revolution.

 

Big Data is defined as the real time collection, analyses, and visualization of vast amounts of the information. In the hands of Data Scientists this raw information is fueling a revolution which many people believe may have as big an impact on humanity going forward as the Internet has over the past two decades. Its enable us to sense, measure, and understand aspects of our existence in ways never before possible.

 

The Human Face of Big Data captures, in glorious photographs and moving essays, an extraordinary revolution sweeping, almost invisibly, through business, academia, government, healthcare, and everyday life. It’s already enabling us to provide a healthier life for our children. To provide our seniors with independence while keeping them safe. To help us conserve precious resources like water and energy. To alert us to tiny changes in our health, weeks or years before we develop a life-threatening illness. To peer into our own individual genetic makeup. To create new forms of life. And soon, as many predict, to re-engineer our own species. And we’ve barely scratched the surface . . .

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CityHome

CityHome | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
The Changing Places MIT Media Lab research group explores how new strategies for architectural design, mobility systems, and networked intelligence can make possible dynamic, evolving places that respond to the complexities of life.

 

We demonstrate how the CityHome, which has a very small footprint (840 square feet), can function as an apartment two to three times that size. This is achieved through a transformable wall system which integrates furniture, storage, exercise equipment, lighting, office equipment, and entertainment systems. One potential scenario for the CityHome is where the bedroom transforms to a home gym, the living room to a dinner party space for 14 people, a suite for four guests, two separate office spaces plus a meeting space, or an a open loft space for a large party. Finally, the kitchen can either be open to the living space, or closed off to be used as a catering kitchen. Each occupant engages in a process to personalize the precise design of the wall units according to his or her unique activities and requirements.

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Are MOOCs hyped?

Are MOOCs hyped? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it

Author: Valerie Strauss

 

If you haven’t heard of MOOCs, you no doubt will, because these Massive Open Online course are becoming all the rage, tagged as the biggest thing in public education since, well, the dawn of public education. (It wasn’t long ago that the Khan Academy was). My colleague Nick Anderson reported about the emergence of the MOOCs movement as a disruptive force in higher education. But there are reasons to think MOOCs are being hyped, and below, former schools superintendent Larry Cuban explains why. Cuban is a former high school social studies teacher (14 years, including seven at Cardozo and Roosevelt high schools in the District), district superintendent (seven years in Arlington, VA) and professor emeritus of education at Stanford University, where he has taught for more than 20 years. His latest book is “As Good As It Gets: What School Reform Brought to Austin.”

 

This appeared on his blog.

 

By Larry Cuban

I have a confession to make. I dropped out of a Massive Open Online course (MOOC) on Artificial Intelligence at Stanford university in the Fall of 2011. There were over 160,000 other students in the class from all over the world. I listened to the two professors on my laptop give mini-lectures, watched fast hands scrawl quickly and cleverly over whiteboards to graphically display the concepts they were teaching. I found the information fascinating. I took a few quizzes. Then I fell behind and realized that I couldn’t keep up, given the other things I was doing so I dropped out. End of story about my first encounter with a MOOC. Turns out, however, that about 138,000 others dropped out also since only 14 percent completed the course and received a certificate.

 

 

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Online learning: pedagogy, technology and opening up higher education

Online learning: pedagogy, technology and opening up higher education | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
How can online learning open, widen and formalise access to quality higher education?

 

Online Guardian debate 23rd November 2012

 

Higher education has always been fond of its acronyms and they don't get much more prolific than the current four letters doing the rounds. From the December 2011 launch of MITx Stateside to the University of Edinburgh's decision to join the Coursera platform, MOOCs (or Massive Open Online Courses) have barely been off the education news menu. Nor was the Observer alone in recently asking: "Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university?"

 

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