Creativity and learning
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Creativity and learning
A mish-mash of items on learning, creativity, innovation and design education
Curated by Clive Hilton
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Online university giant gets bigger

Online university giant gets bigger | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
Within a year of launching, a US online university network has 2.8 million students and announces a further 29 universities joining as partners.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Why do I feel uncomfortable with the explosive growth of Coursera? Smell the money.

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Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go...

Coursera starts process of taking control of and monetising formerly free MOOC. Here we go... | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
This morning, Coursera, the "massively open online course" or MOOC platform founded by two Stanford professors, announced that they’d be partnering with ACE, the American Council on Education, to offer a path to college credit for select...

 

Starting early next year, anyone who successfully completes one of the selected Coursera courses will have the chance to take a proctored exam over the web from ACE, pay a small fee, and earn credit that could be accepted at up to 2,000 universities nationwide.The move comes in the midst of a struggle in the ed-tech movement over business models and openness. The issue is this: beginning with MIT’s Open CourseWare in 2001, the world’s greatest public and nonprofit universities started offering access to some of their professors’ lectures, notes, and other materials online for free. The stuff was under Creative Commons license, meaning anyone could use it or re-use it as they saw fit; but the material--45-minute, amateur-recorded lectures, years-old problem sets--often just sat there, as hard to find and underutilized as books moldering in the library stacks. That changed last January when Stanford’s open online AI course, based on short, snappy videos and quizzes, went viral, with over 200,000 signups. Enter the venture capitalists. That same educational material, funded by taxpayer money and private philanthropy, that used to be available to anyone for free is now being served on a platform that makes it easier to use, but places restrictions on its reuse and may have fees associated with it in the future. Now MOOCs may be very, very popular, but they’re not really open anymore.

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Paul Gagnon's comment, November 15, 2012 6:14 PM
Why am I not surprised...Horseshara...
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 15, 2012 6:37 PM
No, the money has got to come from somewhere. Particularly if you have venture capitalists breathing in your neck. Still, read yesterday's MOOC pedagogy and accreditation by Terry Anderson. We should not become complacent and just think that it will blow over, it won't.
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Would You Pay $100 for a Free Online College Course?

Would You Pay $100 for a Free Online College Course? | Creativity and learning | Scoop.it
In just one year, Coursera has established itself as the giant in the rapidly growing field of online higher education.
Clive Hilton's insight:

Bless 'em. A minor variant on the apochryphal consultant's business model of borrowing your watch and then charging to tell you the time. Venture capitalists aren't moving into Coursera because they believe in free education...

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