Creative Writing
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Creative Writing
This topic is on Creative Writing in the Classroom. With the Common Core, Creative Writing gets pushed more and more to the side. In addition Creative Writing is often seen as lesser or invaluable. This topic shows the importance of Creative Writing, and how to fit it into the Common Core.
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The Philadelphia Experiment — NewsWorks

The Philadelphia Experiment — NewsWorks | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
It’s been nearly a year since I returned to writing full time and in that year I’ve learned a lot about my profession
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Soloman Jones is a former Creaive Writing Professor who now writes fulltime. I curated this blog, because he does something unique in his writing, he writes for social action. On his December 2nd post, he talks about how writing just to be writing is never enough. As humans we need to stand up for something. That is why he has chosed to write full time, so he can use his skills to uncover and publicize the underlying wrongs in society. This blog can get Creative Writing students truly thinking. It will push them ouside of the box of just fluffy stories filled with constant happiness just because it is fun. It gets them to see that their art is truly powerful, and if they have a issue with society they can use their creativity to get others thinking on the topic.

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Show or Tell

Show or Tell | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
Online version of the weekly magazine, with current articles, cartoons, blogs, audio, video, slide shows, an archive of articles and abstracts back to 1925
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This article from the New Yorker is chocked full of Creative Writing Information. It covers the importance of workshopping/collaboration in Creative Writing, and whether or not Creative Writing can be taught. The article first talks about the importance of workshopping and collaboration within a Creative Writing Class. Writing can often be misconstrued as a solely individual endeavor, but this article talks about the importance of giving students time to actually write, and then let their peers review their writing. This provides for a much more meaningful experience, that ends in better writing. Next there are the ideas of whether Creative Writing can be taught. The article uses the The University of Iowa's Writing Workshop (the most renowned Creative Writing Workshop in the world) as an example of Creative Writing being taught. Among those who have completed the program, sixteen are Pulitzer Prize Winners, and three are recent Poet Laureates. I love how this article incorporates the importance of collaboration, and uses statistics and facts to back up the teaching of Creative Writing. 

 

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Scholastic.com | Teachers: Write It | Short Fiction

Step-by-step help on brainstorming, drafting, reviewing, revising, and polishing your writing!
Sarah Worley's insight:

This is a link to a Scholastic Page for writing competitions for students grades 7-12. I think this is a great source for teachers to make writing instantly more meaningful. It is one thing to encourage students to write creatively in the class, but this helps get their ideas out into the world. The contests Scholastic suggests have sections for short stories, poetry, and book reviews. While you don't have to get your students applying for these specific contests, I think requiring students to enter a creative writing piece to a contest or publication for high school students would definitely help make them realize how important writing can be. 

 

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Living Out Loud - Kick-start your creativity

Living Out Loud - Kick-start your creativity | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
If you haven't come across Keri Smith before you're in for a treat! She's a 'rebel' artist and author who helps and encourages people to find their passion and creativity, while not following the rules.
Sarah Worley's insight:

I would suggest any Keri Smith book for a relectant writer. Her other books "Wreck this Journal" and "Tear up this Book" provide creative ways to get students to interact with books. "Living out Loud" would be able to get a student who is stuggling with creative writing in class to get in the mindset of looking at a text in a different light. While this would obviously not be a classroom text, it is something worth suggestion to your less than willing writers.  

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Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling

Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling | Creative Writing | Scoop.it

These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar's Story Artist. Number 9 on the list - When you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn't happen next - is a great one and can apply to writers...


Via jnilz
Sarah Worley's insight:

This is a fun article to get students (or anyone) thinking about Creative Writing. Emma Coats, Pixar's Story Artist originally tweeted these twenty-two rules. These rules get writers thinking about the basics of successful storytelling. There are just so many gems in each of these tweets. Even though it is not meant for the classroom, it is perfect for it. Among the rules, writers are told they WILL have to rewrite, and that nothing is going to be perfect. 

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Skills Practice | Writing Effective Openings

Skills Practice | Writing Effective Openings | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
Tips, examples and a quiz to help students think about what the opening lines of an essay or article must do -- and how to use what they learn to make their own writing stronger.

Via Charles Fischer
Sarah Worley's insight:

This article is a great starting point for creative writing or any other type of writing assignement in the high school English classroom. This article provides examples of great opening lines, and explains how to get students to create their own extraordinary introduction to their written work. I think the examples chosen in this article are also helpful, because it reaches out to students interests in a way that they may not otherwise be reached. For instance, the first effective opening is from a sports article. Providing examples such as this are a great hook for even the most reluctant English students. 

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Courses and Seminars - Mediabistro

Courses and Seminars - Mediabistro | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
A discussion about how to drive creativity and innovation in your organization
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This set of video seminars on sparking creativity is extremely interesting. While it does not focus on Creative Writing in the classroom, I think it shows how getting students to think creatively and outside of the box (such as in a writing class) can lead them to success down the road. Through this seminar it discusses how to set-up creative spaces (which can be mimicked on some level in a Creative Writing Classroom), and then looks at how people came up with unique ideas to jump start their success. I think this seminar provides plenty of ideas for routes a teacher can take within the classroom, generates ideas for sparking creativity, and just exemplifies how creative pays off in the long run. 

 

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The Great Common Core Swindle

The Great Common Core Swindle | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
You may be tempted to take the title of this post the wrong way. No, I’m not going to argue against the Common Core standards. I’d be happy to discuss their drawbacks elsewhere. In fact, if you car...
Sarah Worley's insight:

While this author makes no attempt to hide his bias against the Common Core, his article is acutally helpful in supporting Creative Writing thorough the Common Core Standards. Under the Writing Standards it asks that students to be capable of writing to a range of audiences. This is different from just telling students they have to write for an audience, this gets them to address the variety of audiences they will be faced with. This article is very helpful for any teacher going up against adminstration trying to start a school newspaper or journalism class. The Common Core requires a range of audience, and Creative Writing coursess, journalism, and newspapers definitely fit into this requirement. 

 

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The Healing Power Writing Can Have For Teens - Huffington Post

The Healing Power Writing Can Have For Teens - Huffington Post | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
The Healing Power Writing Can Have For Teens
Huffington Post
When I was a high school English teacher, each year there were always one or two students who needed to write, just like they needed to breathe air.
Sarah Worley's insight:

This article is advocating for the importance of creative writing. Matthew Quick (author of the Silver Linings Playbook) talks about how he always had those couple of students when he was teaching High School English classes who seemed liked they had to write to survive. These students who have to write no matter if it is required or of high quality, often have a lot of deeper issues going on. Quick admits that he was one of these students, and now recognizes that his high school self was suffering from anxiety and depression. The reason this article is so relevant, is not just because it advocates for  creative writing, but because it also advocates for caring teachers. In high school one of his teacher's suggested he enter a poetry contest. The poems had to be typed, and Quick did not know how to type, so he declined. This teacher took it upon herself to type up the poetry and entered it anyway. To this day Quick remembers that teacher, and that incredible act of kindness. As teachers it is important not only to remember why you are teaching the material, but who you are teaching the material to.

 

 

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High school students celebrate creative writing

High school students celebrate creative writing | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
A gathering of young, creative minds filled the Fulkerson Center at Missouri Western State University Wednesday morning. High school students from 15 area schools came to write and learn about writing in the annual Prairie Lands Writing Project.

Via Charles Tiayon
Sarah Worley's insight:

I like this article because it is just a reminder to teachers as to why Creative Writing in the classroom is important. Although this relates an experience University students have, I think it is a great reminder for high school teachers as to why they need to incorporate this type of outlet in the classroom. At the University students spent a day celebrating creative writing. They could submit their own works or just spend the day with other writers. My favorite quote from this article was "A lot of these kids don’t do a lot of sports and clubs, so this is kind of their big day to say, ‘Hey, we’re all one big community of writers.” As teachers it is essential for us to remember that our students have a wide variety of interests, and we should make each student feel valuable no matter what that interest may be. 

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:54 PM

A gathering of young, creative minds filled the Fulkerson Center at Missouri Western State University Wednesday morning. High school students from 15 area schools came to write and learn about writing in the annual Prairie Lands Writing Project.

Mark Henderson, Prairie Lands outreach coordinator, said about 220 students showed up for a day to celebrate creative writing.

 

“It’s for young people who want to write, not because they have to, but because they enjoy it as a hobby; they enjoy creative writing,” he said.

The theme for the event this year was “Writing for the Gold.” The students attended workshops in a variety of genres, such as poetry writing, science fiction and multimedia, and participated in games, open-mic reading and other activities. Missouri Western professors served as the workshop instructors.

The students will have the opportunity to submit their works to the Scholastic Writing Awards contest and be eligible to have their pieces published and receive scholarship funds.

“A lot of these kids don’t do a lot of sports and clubs, so this is kind of their big day to say, ‘Hey, we’re all one big community of writers,’” Mr. Henderson said.

  
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Common Core Narrative Writing Samples

Common Core Narrative Writing Samples | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
This Common Core instructional resource focuses on CCSS.W.3:

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Charles Fischer
Sarah Worley's insight:

This is an informative source for understanding how narrative writing fits into the Common Core. It explains the Common Core Standards, shows prompts, and has samples of student writings. This source provides all explanations, prompts, and samples for all grade levels from K-12. I think this is a great starting point for teachers to argue the need to teach Creative Writing in the classroom. Creative Writing does build many writing skills (such as style and organization), but it often gets pushed aside as frivolous. Pointing out that the Common Core requires this type of writing may help it to reappear in the classroom.  

 

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Mundelein High School students write books for first graders - Mundelein Review

Mundelein High School students write books for first graders - Mundelein Review | Creative Writing | Scoop.it
Mundelein High School students write books for first graders Mundelein Review Jennifer Galindo, 17, also enrolled in the high school creative writing class and focused on her favorite holiday for a children's story that she titled, Christmas with...
Sarah Worley's insight:

This project allows for meaningful creative writing. At the high school level students learn the deeper meanings often hidden in children's stories. At the elementary level it meets Common Core Standards. This is beneficial for both groups of students. Not only do they learn real-world writing and reading, but they get to flex their creative muscles.  

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