Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind
3.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind
Build-A-Bear and American Girl Entrepreneurs and the Business
Curated by Kailyn Weiss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

American Girl Today

American Girl Today | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

American Girl Brands gross sales were $510.9 million in 2011, up $24.3 million or 5%, as compared to $486.6 million in 2010, primarily by sales from the American Girl virtual world and Kanani, the 2011Girl of the Year doll, and the benefit of two new American Girl stores in McLean, Virginia and Lynwood, Washington, which opened in June 2011 and July 2011. Cost of sales increased by 5% in 2011, and net sales increased by 5%, which resulted in relatively flat gross margins.

 http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/MAT/1829327684x0x555821/3C654248-30D8-4A8D-A8FC-53A89560A3C3/2011_Mattel_Annual_Report.pdf

 

In 1998, Pleasant Rowland sold American Girl to Mattel for $700 Million.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Maxine Clark Profile - Forbes.com

Maxine Clark Profile - Forbes.com | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

Maxine Clark, Build-A-Bear's founder, is now 62 and is still the CEO and chairman of the board for the company.  She is doing very well, last year she made over $600,000. According to http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=182478&p=irol-fundIncomeA , the company is doing very well also, with a net worth of around $394.38 Million last year.  Sales are down from pervious years though.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

American Girl | Philanthropy & Donations

American Girl | Philanthropy & Donations | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

American Girl has many partners: Save the Children, K.I.D.S. (Kids In Distressed Situations), NACHRI, American Girl Fashion Show, United Way, Special Olympics, Madison Children's Museum, and American Girl Fund for Children.  Each of the partners have something to do with children, especially girls. With all of these partnerships American Girl benefits society along with cheering up little girls with a new doll.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Similarites and Differences

Similarites and Differences | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

Both Pleasant Rowland and Maxine Clark both attended College and had pervious jobs before starting up their companies.  They also both have written books.  Rowland was perviously a teacher and Clark was the president of Payless Shoe Source.  So Clark had expreience in the business field, unlike Rowland. Both women were in their 40's when they became entrepreneurs. Rowland started her company because she didn't see a good variety of dolls for kids. Clark was bored while shopping so she wanted to make shopping exciting again, especially for kids. Both women seem as though they are willing to take risks, both put their own money into starting up their companies.  Both women wanted better options for children's toys, so they obviously have a heart for children. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxine_Clark

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Pleasant Rowland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pleasant Rowland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

Pleasant Rowland was born in Chicago in 1941.  She had 3 sisters and 1 brother.  She graduated from Wells College in 1962.  She was a teacher and a news anchor prior to creating American Girl.  She created American Girl at the age of 42, when she realized that kids did not have a good variety of dolls.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Chapter 60.  HOW WE GOT STARTED - Pleasant Rowland

Chapter 60.  HOW WE GOT STARTED - Pleasant Rowland | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

First started in 1986, when Pleasant Rowland wanted to target the tween market, helping them grow before hitting the teenage years.  Each doll had a story, from growing up during the Depression to living during the Colonial Years.  She started out just making dolls but then Rowland added books and different outfits for the dolls.  "I started Pleasant Company when I was 45 and I'd already had several careers. I'd been an elementary school teacher, a TV news reporter, the author of reading textbooks, and the publisher of a small magazine. I had no formal business education." In 1984 she attended a convention with her husband and realized she needed to do more with her life, that Christmas she wanted to give her nieces a doll for Christmas, but all she could find at the store were Cabbage Patch Kids and Barbie, neither of which she was fond of...and that is when it all began.

 

The list-management company advising us on our mailing list also thought American Girl was going to be a huge failure. They told us to mail no more than 100,000 catalogs. I said, 'No way.' We had to take our shot that Christmas, and American Girl would either succeed or fail. So we mailed 500,000 catalogs and crossed our fingers.  Then American Girl Dolls sales took off, they sold $1.7 million worth of product in their first 4 months!  The next years were just as successful bringing in $77 Million.

 

That is when she decided to add in Bitty Babies and books about friendship and growing up.  She then started the Amrican Girl Store and Resturant in Chicago.  After doing all of that she was tired.  So she sold the business to Mattel.  Mattel because the CEO at the time was the creator of Barbie and Rowland felt as though it would be in good hands.

 

Obviously it was.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Factors necessary for founding a successful business

Factors necessary for founding a successful business | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

This article states that the five factors necessary for founding a successful business are the following: 1. business and industry knowledge, 2. organization and management capabilities, 3. marketing skill, 4. customer/vendor relations,and 5.  vision.

I agree that these factors are important but I would not consider them necessary.  Like I stated before Rowland had no previous business experience and she still made a company thrive.  The skills needed when American Girl and Build-A-Bear were founded are different that what this article states, I would say that the skills needed would just be to have a passion and be willing to take a risk and to run a business.  Which both of these women did, I am sure there were problems but does any of that really matter now?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Build-A-Bear's Founder Shares Her Story

Build-A-Bear's Founder Shares Her Story | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

According to wikipedia.com, Maxine Clark was born in 1949 in Florida.  She graduated from the University of Georgia in 1971. She also has an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from St. Louis University. She was 47 when she started Build-A-Bear and she left a well paying job to start it.  She started it because she wanted to make shopping more exciting and for kids to have a great experience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kailyn Weiss
Scoop.it!

Partners - Build-A-Bear Workshop US

Partners - Build-A-Bear Workshop US | Rowland and Clark- Women with Children in Mind | Scoop.it

Build-A-Bear benefits society it many ways, mostly through their partners.  Build-A-Bear is partners with World Wildlife Fund, they donate $1 to WWF for each stuffed animal in the WWF Collectifriend™ series purchased at our stores and on www.buildabear.com. Also, Bearemy's Kennel Pals,  they donate a portion of the proceeds from the sale of each full-sized Bearemy's Kennel Pals friend to local animal shelters and stray pet rescue and rehabilitation organizations around the country. They are also have their own Build-A-Bear Foundation, they are committed to improving communities and impacting lives through meaningful philanthropic programs that support causes for children and families.  They also partnered with the First Book Program, in which they donate $1 to First Book for each Read Teddy purchased at their stores and on www.buildabear.com.

Through all these partnerships and just trying to brighten childrens days Build-A-Bear is very beneficial to society.

more...
No comment yet.