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Copyright: Sword Not Shield

Copyright: Sword Not Shield | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

The article below contains several examples of copyright wrongfully employed to either: (1.) silence critics; or (2) attempt to drum competitors out of business by making false accusations. I had a case once where a company tried to trademark and copyright a “type” of Chinese tea. Apparently, there is a great deal of money to be made selling tea. My client changed the name of their product and website. The competitor still sued and would accept nothing less than my client closing its doors and ceasing business. Ultimately the trademark office denied the Plaintiff’s application stating that the name was merely descriptive of a type of tea, and the case settled. Unfortunately, that was after months of litigation in federal court. So you can imagine my reticence to hand Plaintiffs like that tools such as SOPA. Tools that will be abused, and initially impossible to defend. You may not get any due process until you are already ruined financially as a business. In the example above my client would have been forced to “cease business” under SOPA, because their website visibility and ability to process payments would have been gone. There are many examples of unfair competition (or censorship) executed under the cover of intellectual property enforcement.

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Future of Copyright Contest -- IndieGoGo

Future of Copyright Contest -- IndieGoGo | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it
What should the future of copyright law look like? Write, sing, animate or talk about it, and win the prize funded by crowds.
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Clay Shirky: Why SOPA is a bad idea | Video on TED.com

TED Talks What does a bill like PIPA/SOPA mean to our shareable world? At the TED offices, Clay Shirky delivers a proper manifesto -- a call to defend our freedom to create, discuss, link and share, rather than passively consume.
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Are Creative Commons Licenses Even Enforceable?

I’ve long been concerned that Creative Commons (CC) licenses are not enforceable. I’d like to explain, but a bit of background is necessary first.

 

My main focus here is copyright, one type of so-called “intellectual property,” or IP, since CC has to do with licenses (permissions) for copyright-protected works or authorship.

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DeNA's fishing game violates Gree's copyright: court | The Japan Times Online

DeNA's fishing game violates Gree's copyright: court | The Japan Times Online | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it
The Tokyo District Court on Thursday ordered DeNA Co. to suspend delivery of its popular cellphone fishing game and pay about ¥230 million in damages to rival Gree Inc. for infringing on its copyright.
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EFF asks US Copyright Office to exempt jailbreaking from DMCA | Naked Security

EFF asks US Copyright Office to exempt jailbreaking from DMCA | Naked Security | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

Currently under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) in the United States it is illegal to circumvent Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology in a device.

 

Technically speaking things like jailbreaking your iPhone, rooting your Android and modding your Xbox can be considered a circumvention of DRM and are illegal.

 

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has made a formal request to the US Copyright Office to consider exempting these activities from enforcement under the DMCA.

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Copyright: Sword Not Shield

Copyright: Sword Not Shield | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

The article below contains several examples of copyright wrongfully employed to either: (1.) silence critics; or (2) attempt to drum competitors out of business by making false accusations. I had a case once where a company tried to trademark and copyright a “type” of Chinese tea. Apparently, there is a great deal of money to be made selling tea. My client changed the name of their product and website. The competitor still sued and would accept nothing less than my client closing its doors and ceasing business. Ultimately the trademark office denied the Plaintiff’s application stating that the name was merely descriptive of a type of tea, and the case settled. Unfortunately, that was after months of litigation in federal court. So you can imagine my reticence to hand Plaintiffs like that tools such as SOPA. Tools that will be abused, and initially impossible to defend. You may not get any due process until you are already ruined financially as a business. In the example above my client would have been forced to “cease business” under SOPA, because their website visibility and ability to process payments would have been gone. There are many examples of unfair competition (or censorship) executed under the cover of intellectual property enforcement.

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How Technology Has Made Book Publishing Accessible to Everyone | Copyright Licensing

How Technology Has Made Book Publishing Accessible to Everyone | Copyright Licensing | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

You possibly know that Amazon is the world’s largest bookseller, but did you know that they also publish books? They will also distribute your book for you. Barnes and Noble has a distribution program too.

 

You can also location your book on Amazon yourself. Here’s how:

 

You can join their Benefit Program. This program enables you to use their service to sell and distribute your book. There is an annual fee, at the time this book was written, and they take a percentage from each and every sale of 55%.

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Google Now Censors The Pirate Bay, isoHunt, 4Shared and More | TorrentFreak

Google Now Censors The Pirate Bay, isoHunt, 4Shared and More | TorrentFreak | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

Google has expanded its search blacklist to include many of the top file-sharing sites on the Internet, including The Pirate Bay. The changes were quietly processed and appear to be broader than previous additions. Google’s blacklist prevents the names of sites appearing in their Instant and Autocomplete search services, while the pages themselves remain indexed.

 

Since January 2011, Google has been filtering “piracy-related” terms from its ‘Autocomplete‘ and ‘Instant‘ services.

 

Google users searching for terms like “torrent”, “BitTorrent” and “RapidShare” will notice that no suggestions and search results appear before they type the full word. As a consequence, there’s sharp decrease in Google searches for these terms.

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Your images are a virus. They are EVERYWHERE on the Internet - Scott Hanselman

Your images are a virus. They are EVERYWHERE on the Internet - Scott Hanselman | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

This is a silly little story of a silly little image. An image whose original conceptual source isn't me. Well, I made the image, I made it in PowerPoint with Smart Art in about 12 seconds over 4 years ago. But per my G+ friend James Saull, I know now that the concept is called "The Hedgehog Principle" or "The Hedgehog Concept" by Jim Collins. You'll find it everywhere but it started in 2001 with the book "Good to Great." I likely absorbed it at some past point and when I got the job I drew three cricles. It's one of those "duh, that's awesome" concepts. It's just a Venn Diagram with three circles with the intersection, the middle bit, being the most awesome ideal part. This isn't about the original of the concept, it's how one image is found everywhere on the internet, spreading like a virus. Once you put an image on the internet, you'll never be able to take it down.

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Simon Says!: Copyright or wrong?

Simon Says!: Copyright or wrong? | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

Many writers get confused by copyright. Indeed, with legal staff specialising in this one small area of the law, it can instill fear and uncertainty in those who do not understand it.

 

However, for writers, understanding the basics will put you in good stead.

 

Copyright occurs as soon as you produce something artistic. (This can be something in writing, a drawing or picture, a photograph, some music, a video, etc). As I am typing this blog posting the copyright is being created. I don't have to register my copyright. Under current British and EU legislation, it is created as soon as I create something.

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Docu on to copy(right) or wrong

Mumbai: We have always known it exists, we have talked about it, we have practically condoned it but now there are three Mumbaiites who have made a documentary on it. We're talking about Bollywood's affinity to plagiarism.


The documentary starts with the note: “We present a four step plan if executed our plagiarists friends can bypass all copyrights and critics”.


And so begins the Four Step Plan, a 60-minute documentary with a sarcastic take on plagiarism in Bollywood.

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Virgin, Northern Rock, And Crown Copyright Restrictions – The Quillcards Blog

Virgin, Northern Rock, And Crown Copyright Restrictions – The Quillcards Blog | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

Growing up in England, I was aware that Crown copyright protected all kinds of things from being copied to the detriment of the publishers – namely the Crown, the courts, Parliament, Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, and other similar institutions.

 

At least that was how I looked at it until I read Heather Brooke’s extremely readable book The Revolution Will Be Digitised: Dispatches From The Information War.

 

In it she explains what Crown copyright is from her perspective.

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UTSpeaks: Copy right or wrong | UTS News Room

UTSpeaks: Copy right or wrong | UTS News Room | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

While organised crime reaps billions from piracy, students and others are being sued for illegal downloads. Meanwhile, with technology making it possible for all of us to be thieves of creativity, how can artists and thinkers make a living and keep cultural expression alive?

 

This lecture by Professor Michael Fraser addressed these and other complex issues, and proposed that sweeping regulatory reform was now urgent. With the new National Broadband Network being a possible catalyst, he suggested Australia could devise the policy, technical framework and standards from which content producers and consumers could enjoy a win-win deal.

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YouTube - Content ID: Block, Monetize, or Track Viewing Metrics

YouTube has created an advanced set of copyright policies and content management tools to give rights holders control of their content. YouTube provides content management solutions for rights holders of all sizes across the world, and provides tools to cater to the specific needs of various rights owners.

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Why can’t I copy money? Is that censorship?: Thoughts on framing SOPA and PIPA

Why can’t I copy money? Is that censorship?: Thoughts on framing SOPA and PIPA | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

I have been fascinated by the SOPA and PIPA debate because it shows the power of framing an argument. Depending on how you frame an argument, you can set the parameters for how it will be discussed and ultimately how it may be resolved.

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Copyright bill hearings start today - Technology & Science - CBC News

Copyright bill hearings start today - Technology & Science - CBC News | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

The special legislative committee studying the government's copyright reform bill begins hearing from witnesses today.

 

The committee on Bill C-11, chaired by NDP MP Glenn Thibeault, is meeting for three hours and will hear from academic and legal experts, two arts groups and the Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians.

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Copyright Free Zone: Vidding-A New Beginning

Copyright Free Zone: Vidding-A New Beginning | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

A new adventure in vidding using nothing that is copyrighted but instead relying entirely on Public Domain, Creative Commons license, and self-created materials.

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Kind of Screwed - Waxy.org

Kind of Screwed - Waxy.org | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

Remember Kind of Bloop, the chiptune tribute to Miles Davis' Kind of Blue that I produced? I went out of my way to make sure the entire project was above board, licensing all the cover songs from Miles Davis's publisher and giving the total profits from the Kickstarter fundraiser to the five musicians that participated.

 

But there was one thing I never thought would be an issue: the cover art.

 

Before the project launched, I knew exactly what I wanted for the cover — a pixel art recreation of the original album cover, the only thing that made sense for an 8-bit tribute to Kind of Blue. I tried to draw it myself, but if you've ever attempted pixel art, you know how demanding it is. After several failed attempts, I asked a talented friend to do it.

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Global censorship tracked by new project | Voxy.co.nz

Global censorship tracked by new project | Voxy.co.nz | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), in collaboration with over a dozen civil society organizations worldwide, today launched Global Chokepoints at www.globalchokepoints.org to document how copyright enforcement is being used to censor online free expression in countries around the world.

 

Global Chokepoints, funded in part through a grant by the Open Society Foundation, is an online resource created to document and monitor proposals from around the world to turn Internet intermediaries into copyright police. These proposals harm Internet users' rights of privacy, due process and freedom of expression, as well as endanger the future of the free and open Internet. Global Chokepoints is designed to provide empirical information to digital activists and policymakers and to help coordinate international opposition to attempts to cut off free expression through misguided copyright laws and transnational agreements, like the Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

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Article: What Will Record Labels Look Like in the Future? by Jason Feinberg

The pioneers of the music industry couldn’t have seen this coming in their wildest dreams. When publishers were selling sheet music in the late 1800s, the idea of people privately sharing their product, independent of location and physical constraints, would have seemed ridiculous. But now record labels have been decimated by the digital shift, and are rethinking their entire business model to survive.

 

Even as recently as the 1970s, the thought that consumers would be able to bring the industry to its knees by circumventing the existing structure and barriers seemed ludicrous. Large companies solidified vertical and/or horizontal integration across almost all elements in the supply chain; this practically ensured a stranglehold on consumers.

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Why you shouldn't use a Creative Commons License if you care about views or money

You may have seen people reference a Creative Commons license at their blogs or websites. Someone you trust may have told you that using that license could help protect your work from being copied by other people.

 

I would tell you just the opposite. If you intend to make money from your writing, whether here at Hubpages or anywhere else, referencing a Creative Commons license is a bad idea. Not only won't it protect you from copying, it may actually cause MORE copying!

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Teacher Librarian eLearning Day 2011 by Simon Crook on Prezi

Creative Commons and Twitter in Education - Teacher Librarian eLearning Day 2011

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What’s wrong with copyright?

Without copyright protection creative types would not create. That, apparently, is one of the defenses put forward by the likes of the RIAA and the MPAA. These organizations chase after file sharers and attempt to gain millions of dollars of recompense each year from people who swap music and movie torrents. But isn’t this defense simply justification for a whole new industry that could outgrow the music and movie industries themselves?

 

It’s fairly well documented that many recording artists in the past were offered draconian record company contracts and received little compensation for their creativity compared with the company profit lines. There’s also the almost forgotten fact that decades of music charts were hyped as company A&R staff bought up their label’s records to boost chart placements. There’s also the pricing concept associated with a manufactured music disk and accompanying liner notes and the virtual download version of an “album” and how that somehow should cost the same instore and online.

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An Anthropologist Goes Techno: Copy Right or Wrong - The Pirate Bay Case and Mind Games

The Pirate Bay is a Swedish website that tracks BitTorrents. It has to do with sharing files.

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Copy-Right or Copy-Wrong: Would Locke Support Copyright?

Copy-Right or Copy-Wrong: Would Locke Support Copyright? | Copy right and wrong | Scoop.it

From Communications to Sociology, this year I feel as if copyright is constantly brought up in the core curriculum in the majority of my classes. As I think about copyright and intellectual property, I immediately associate John Locke and his view on property rights. According to Locke, each individual is born with the natural right to protect his or her own life, liberty, and property. Locke also points out that each individual has a right to be compensated for wrongful injury to their own life, liberty, or property which has been caused by other individuals. If this were the case, if Locke were alive today, would he believe in copyright and intellectual property laws?

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