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Maximizing Profit: The PBL Classroom Without PBL

Maximizing Profit: The PBL Classroom Without PBL | Content Curation | Scoop.it
Facilitating problem-based learning (PBL) in the classroom requires a shift in pedagogy from a "stand and deliver" class. The problem presented at the beginning of a PBL cycle must create an authenti
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Classroom Climate Plan

I feel that this article on Edutopia provides great ideas as to how to keep a project based learning environment, even without a specific project based task. It argues a stance that I agree with that “PBL requires students to communicate their understanding of the problem, helping them develop critical thinking skills and increasing academic discourse in the classroom.” These ideas however, should always be present in the classroom, not only when provided with a project-based task. When I read this article, I focused on the norms that are established in a project based learning classroom, and how they can be very beneficial throughout many other aspects of a school year. I hope to have this environment in my classroom that encourages students to learn what works best for them in order to complete their goals. I believe that as the teacher, it is important to provide students with expectations for the school year. An example of this may be how group work will operate in your classroom. With given expectations, students learn more about their peers and how they learn. If the teacher maintains these expectations, than students can benefit in terms of their own individual growth in learning. When combining this idea with the value of communication an critical thinking skills, your classroom environment will help to enrich your students learning. Traditionally, the teacher mainly provided student learning. In this article, ideas were brought together to steer away from this, and create classrooms with a “team approach to learning.” I feel that these are very valuable ideas that I plan to execute in my classroom in the future.

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Classroom Management (Elementary): A Morning with Linda Kasarjians 1st Grade Class - YouTube

Welcome to Our Promo for "Classroom Management (Elementary): A Morning with Linda Kasarjians 1st Grade Class." Teachers Network is now also making available ...
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

Classroom Climate Plan

In this video, a New York City public school teacher discussed what she finds to work for her unique classroom climate. She establishes that “consistency, clear expectations, and routines,” are the most important pieces to having a successful classroom environment that is beneficial to the teacher and all students. She believes that these routines are “the basis for any successful classroom.” I believe this to a degree, because I think, like this teacher, that when students take ownership of their routines, then they are more likely to stick. I believe that routines are very important, especially for a new teacher to utilize in creating a positive, and structured classroom environment. I believe that when these routines show respect for others in your classroom, and do not only dictate the events of a school day, then they can be successful in creating a good classroom environment. I liked how this teacher compared her ideas of classroom management to solving a puzzle. Each new class that begins a school year begins a new puzzle. You need to figure out what works, and what does not. When students are in an environment in which they feel comfortable growing as learners, they will display the confidence necessary to best complete their goals. In my classroom, I want students to have routines that keep them focused on their goals, but also encourage creative thinking and learning. Teachers share these classroom management ideas every day, through all types of mediums. I found this particular video on YouTube, where many other similar videos can be found.  

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Daily Rituals: The First Fifteen Minutes | Scholastic.com

Daily Rituals: The First Fifteen Minutes | Scholastic.com | Content Curation | Scoop.it
I don’t believe that there is one “right” way to start the school day. I have my traditions, and I have watched beautiful and very different beginnings in many other classrooms. Here are just some possibilities.
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Classroom Climate Plan

I think that these daily rituals provided by the teacher in this Scholastic article are very beneficial to fostering the type of classroom environment that I wish to have in the future. I want my students to know that I care about the needs of each and everyone of them. This starts right at the beginning of the school day. I agree that students should be productive when they begin the school day, but this productivity is defined differently by each individual student. I think that as teachers, we cannot simply give every student the same math worksheet at the beginning of the day, and have them adjust at the same speed, and at the same level as each of their peers. For this reason, I agree with the teacher in this article, that it is important to cater to student needs. When students can learn to adjust to the start of the school day by doing something productive that they find interesting, than I believe that they will be more motivated to complete the rest of the day in a positive, and successful manner.  I believe that when students have the control to choose their productive activities, then students will create a larger trust with their teachers. I know that when I was given the opportunity of choice within my classroom, I felt a positive connection with that specific teacher, knowing that they trusted me to make good decisions.  I believe that it is this type of positive environment that will encourage the success of Project Based Learning in the classroom. When teachers provide students with choice, the students respond in a positive way. This connection in the classroom will not only foster behavior management, but will also foster the positive connections that lead to academic success and growth in the classroom.

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Why School Culture Matters, and How to Improve It

Why School Culture Matters, and How to Improve It | Content Curation | Scoop.it
Obviously, school leaders can't always mimic businesses -- but they can learn from them. When business leaders teach principals the skills that they use to build a strong organizational culture, school leaders can completely transform their schools.
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Classroom Climate Project

 

It’s very interesting to know that Principals’ training does not include much on creating a school culture, whereas training for business executives stresses this aspect heavily. I feel that Principals should focus on this just as much, if not more than business executives do. Children need to feel a sense of comfort as soon as they walk into their school in order to encourage increased learning. I believe that this is very important on top of classroom environments.

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What does PBL look like in the classroom?

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I also chose to scoop this because I feel that it is a useful rubric-style sheet to help keep me, as a future teacher, on track with the goals that Project Based Learning is meant to accomplish.

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Make Room for Innovation and Creativity in PBL | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE

Make Room for Innovation and Creativity in PBL | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE | Content Curation | Scoop.it
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

I believe that this article was interesting to add to my content curation, because it shows how these ideas of teaching global competence in our elementary school classrooms can impact students in their later lives. It was an interesting approach to see how these older children are applying the knowledge that should have started to be taught in elementary school. I also believe that its importance on keeping a safe classroom environment was interesting to read. It is very true that in a safe classroom environment, students feel more comfortable taking risks and learning from their mistakes (which are very important in PBL). Im looking forward to seeing how my efforts in the elementary classroom can transform into global competency in older children.

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Project-Based Learning in an Elementary Science Classroom - YouTube

Third-grade students at Rockledge Elementary join thousands of kids across North America to track migration patterns of butterflies and other species as part...
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I chose to use this video in particular because I think it shows a great example of how project based learning can be applied to any classroom. This teacher in particular has been using "Journey North" for many years, and believes that it can be fit into any curriculum or set of standards pretty easily. I hope to use a project like this one in my own classroom one day! I especially liked the inclusion of the students letter writing with children in Mexico because it brings in the aspect of global competence that is so important to teach to young children.

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Outdoor Classrooms at Marshall Elementary Help Teach Students Everything From Science to Art - YouTube

At Marshall Elementary School in Spring ISD, the school grounds are teaching tools used to engage students in learning about science, art and their environment.
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

Classroom Climate Plan

This video discusses a particular elementary school’s experience with an outdoor classroom. I believe that this type of environment can be very beneficial to students. I think that by learning in different types of environments, students have the opportunity to find what types of learning styles work for them. While utilizing creative thinking, I believe that an outdoor classroom can positively affect student achievement. This particular school uses their outdoor classroom to engage students in learning about science, art, and their environment. I believe that spaces such as these help students to become more well-rounded individuals due to the fact that they have been exposed to many different types of learning within a school environment. This classroom environment gives teachers and students real-world examples to discuss and foster learning. I think that a classroom with this unique exposure would work well in conjunction with project based learning, and lead to a greater development of global competency amongst all students. Students with this exposure have a wider variety of experiences that can help them to develop this global perspective.

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Eight Tips and Tricks to Redesign Your Classroom

Eight Tips and Tricks to Redesign Your Classroom | Content Curation | Scoop.it
David Bill, who's spent the past three years helping teachers redesign classroom spaces, offers eight tips and tricks to remake your room.
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

Classroom Climate Plan

I think that this video was a very interesting look into the concept of designing a classroom not just for convenience or for the look, but rather to reimagine learning spaces that match the classroom environment to teaching and learning goals. I think that this concept, one of the many that we discussed in EDCI397, is a very important aspect to take to your first classroom. There is much more to it than all of the pretty organizational ideas and board layouts that we see on pinterest. I believe that a great teacher is constantly looking for new ways to adjust their classroom to their needs, the needs of the curriculum, and the needs of the students. Like they said in the video, students should want to learn in this space, should want to hang out in this space, and should want to feel that it is a comfortable and organized environment. This video touched on many aspects that we discussed in class such as the crucial idea of using all areas of your classroom to their fullest potential.  This means that an empty corner is not the best that a teacher can do. We need to reimagine our spaces, and try to connect to our students to best foster their growth socially and academically. This will mean something different for each and every classroom, because each class of students has a different, unique balance of characteristics.  This being said, classroom dynamic will change every year, so I think that it is important for teachers to look closely at what is working and what is not. This concept of mobility was also mentioned in the video that I chose, I believe that as teachers grow, they learn what works best and what does not. As long as each space has purpose, and each space is helping the class to complete the goals necessary, then you are on the right track. I believe that the discussions that we had in our class helped me to start thinking about how I want my classroom to display these ideas. I want my classroom to have many different types of spaces that help to foster learning for all different types of students. This may be a reading corner, or a computer desk, or even a station dedicated to using arts to express creativity.

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What’s wrong with classroom behavior charts?

What’s wrong with classroom behavior charts? | Content Curation | Scoop.it
It’s an administrative tactic that Bill Gates would never use on his employees, yet it’s common in many classrooms. Why classroom behavior charts are likely to backfire.
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

Classroom Climate Project

 

I think that this is a very interesting article that addresses the idea that behavior management charts, which are common in elementary school classrooms, are not always beneficial to your students and classroom climate. There are two sides to this argument. Some say that charts such as these teach children to be accountable for their own behavior, and the other side says that this method causes feelings of inadequacy, which leads to “public shaming.” After reading this article, I am starting to agree that classroom behavior charts are not the best method to promote a positive classroom climate.

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How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space | Content Curation | Scoop.it
Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin.
Take a moment an
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

Classroom Climate Project

 

To be honest, my first thought when this article asked me to imagine a creative space, was not a school. I love the ideas that this article expressed on how to change your classroom into a “thinking space.” I think that fostering collaboration is one of the most important aspects that you need to bring to your classroom. This article suggested placing tables into groupings or “pods,” which I feel is a great start to really introducing the importance of collaboration in the classroom. I also agree that its really important to establish that children can use the front of the classroom as a resource, and it’s not just used when the teacher tells you to sit in the front for a lesson. Overall, this article gives a great overview of how to transform your classroom into a “thinking space” rather than a traditional classroom for lecturing and ”work.”

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Project Based Learning: Explained. - YouTube

The Buck Institute for Education commissioned the cutting-edge advertising agency, Common Craft, to create a short animated video that explains in clear lang...
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I added this video because it is a great introduction to Project Based Learning, created by the Buck Institute for Education. I think that as a future teacher, a video like this can help to really show us how PBL works on an easy-to-understand level.

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Tips for Teaching Grade School Students How to Make Global Impact

Tips for Teaching Grade School Students How to Make Global Impact | Content Curation | Scoop.it
How you can encourage global perspectives in your students: Teachers from John Stanford International School in Seattle share a few favorite strategies.
Kristen Kinnear's insight:

I feel that this video is an excellent display of teaching global competence in the classroom. This teacher in particular is teaching global competence as respect for others differences. She is capturing this throughout a project about festivals of light, which explores different world cultures and religions. I personally loves this teachers emphasis on reflection for her students. I feel that this is an integral part of project based learning, and without it, students may not get the most out of this meaningful unit. My favorite phrase in this video was about how PBL in her classroom was aimed at "building empathy," and "teaching tolerance" in her classroom. I am keeping this in my mind for when I become a classroom teacher. I feel that those phrases alone can capture the true meaning of PBL.

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