Content: Addition
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Math

Math | Content: Addition | Scoop.it
Addition Word Clues worksheet for math notebook
Madeline Morgan's insight:

 

Along with teaching students how to use numbers in order to learn addition they also need to be taught the vocabulary that comes along with it. I found this worksheet that helps students differentiate between subtraction vocabulary and addition vocabulary. I think this is a skill that is very important for students to learn. I think that having students do an activity like this will have them think through which words would be addition and which would not. In my classroom I would have the students complete this worksheet and then as a whole class use it to make an anchor chart with addition vocabulary to display in the classroom. I think this would be very helpful to the students because we would be able to talk through the meaning to the words and then they would have a visual to see in the classroom at all times. These words are key in order for students to complete addition word problems, as well as understanding the meanings of the math symbols. The addition vocabulary that comes with teaching addition is just as important as teaching how to use the numbers. Teaching this vocabulary allows the students to see the connection between the numbers/symbols and the words. This connection is critical for students to know and understand. As students progress in math their math vocabulary will expand as well. If students start with a basis of understanding what math vocabulary is their ability to add to their math vocabulary list will be much easier.

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Math -1.OA.1

Math -1.OA.1 | Content: Addition | Scoop.it
addition - maybe helpful to use for unknowns in all positions.
Madeline Morgan's insight:

 

When teaching addition a major part is teaching students the part-part whole method. During my time in my internship I have been able to see that this is sometime's very complicated for the students to visualize. I found this activity and thought it was excellent in order to teach the students this strategy. The tray allows the students to visually see what part-part whole is and how to do it. I also think it is great because the students will be physically counting out the numbers and using manipulatives. I also really like how the trays are labeled. The labels allow the studnets to see what are the parts and what is the whole. In the future when I use this activity I would add the word whole next to the word total so the students do not get confused by different terms. By doing this it will allow the students to learn the word whole also can be referred to as the total. I also like this activity because it can be used with more complicated numbers as well. For example, when the students move to addtion of 2 digit numbers they can still use the tray to show them the part-part whole method. I plan to use this in my future classroom as either a center or a group activity.

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Addition & Subtraction

Addition & Subtraction | Content: Addition | Scoop.it
Little Minds at Work: Addition
Madeline Morgan's insight:

When starting to teach students the many strategies that students can use in order to solve addition problems, counting their fingers is one that teachers teach. I saw this acitvity and thought it was great. In my mentors classroom now I observe the students trying to use this strategy, but don't see them using their fingers the correct way to assist them. I think that this is an excellent tool that the students can use in order to use this strategy. This tool can be used in order to teach the students how to use their hands. Once the students learn this they can then move from using this tool to using their own fingers. I love how this tool gives the students a great visual and shows the students how the fingers represent addition. I plan to use this activity in my future classroom as a great visual for addition. Also this activity doesn't just have to be used when teaching the counting on fingers strategy. It can be used when teaching addition in general. The fingers on the hands can simply represent a manipulative to assist the students with addition.

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Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas: Add It Up! A Gross Motor Addition Game

Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas: Add It Up! A Gross Motor Addition Game | Content: Addition | Scoop.it
Madeline Morgan's insight:

 

I found another activity that was also great for addition. I have seen this activity before and think that it would be an excellent way to have students practice mental math. For this activity, you take a beach ball and write different numbers on it. Then the students take the beach ball and toss it to one another. Whatever numbers their hands land on they have to say outloud and add the numbers up in their head. Once they get the answer they say it outloud and then throw the ball to another student. I love this activity because it makes the students have to do the mental math quickly, while they are also working on gross motor skills. In the lower grades gross motor skills are very important for students to work on, because they are still young, being able to catch and throw the ball is an excellent skill to practice that is outside of math. Also mental math in addition is a skill that is taught very heavily at the end of learning addition on paper. Being able to have the students look at two numbers and quickly tell what they add to is a great skill to be able to do. This skill again is something that is taught after the students have the basic foundation of what addition is and how to do it.  In my future classroom I plan to add activities like this because the students will be able to have fun and move around and do math. I think this will make the math more fun and something that they will enjoy doing. This activity could be used as a special occasion or it could be used as a warm up at the beginning of the math lesson. It would allow the students to move around and then get ready for the rest of their math lesson.

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Differentiating in Math Using Computer Games

Differentiating in Math Using Computer Games | Content: Addition | Scoop.it

Technology can be a key component in teaching Math to young students. See how using computer games and different technology when teaching addition and subtraction can be effective. Covers Common Core State Standards for Math.


Via Darren Burris, Heather Wehrle
Madeline Morgan's insight:

 A great video (thanks to Heather) that explains how and why technology should and can be used in order to teach addition. In my future classroom if there were enough computer for my students to do this I think using technology to help teach math is an excellent tool. In the video it explains how this teacher in particular really likes the math games that the students play on the computer because they are addition games that test their knowledge and the games give the students immediate feedback. I think this is great because like the teacher stated in the video while those students get feedback from playing the games, he can be meeting with a small group of students who need his support. I also think this is an excellent tool to use when teaching addition because by using technology students are not held down by it. For example, if a student is moving at a faster pace then others in his or her class, they can do harder math games. Using technology allows students to move at their own pace without affecting other stundents. I also thought that in this video another great point was explained when it comes to having students use techonolgy in the math classroom. Just because the students are using the computer does not mean they are not allowed to write the problems down or use other manipulatives in order to solve the problems. The technology should be used as an additional tool in order to teach math. Manipulatives and other strategies should be used along with the technology in order for students to continue practicing these things. Using these online addition games are a great way to keep students interested and always trying to move up or get to the next level. The games are constantly assessing the students on what they understand about the certain topic they are working on. I also love the idea of technology because it can be used for any topic, it does not have to be just used for just addition.

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Heather Wehrle's curator insight, September 28, 2013 8:49 AM

This video provides excellent ideas for how to meet the needs of many different levels of students in one classroom.  The teacher uses technology to meet the varying needs of students in his class.  I agree with his assertion that using computers helps students work at their own pace.  The programs that he states in the video allow students to move forward based on their performance.  The computer can give the students immediate feedback.  I believe that the instant feedback also assists students in self-monitoring.  They are instantly being able to see that they were incorrect in their thinking and can ask their teacher for help adjusting their thought-process to get the math correct.  They can then practice more problems that allow them to expand on their knowledge.

 

Having online resources that are fun for students also encourages them to practice their math outside of school.  With internet access, students will be able to visit these gaming sites outside of the classroom and build upon their knowledge.  Giving students resources to help them learn in and out of the classroom is important.  The games are engaging and fun, encouraging students to participate in them.  They also show real-world situations in which math would be used which helps students see the uses of math outside of school.

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DIY Addition Game | Crafts for Kids | PBS Parents

DIY Addition Game | Crafts for Kids | PBS Parents | Content: Addition | Scoop.it
Make math more fun with this easy-to-make, frugal game! You can make it more difficult for older children by using higher numbers or doing speed rounds.
Madeline Morgan's insight:

I plan to use this game/concept in my future classroom. This activity is such an excellent way to get students up and moving and also getting them to manipulate obejcts in order to visually see addition. The students can use different objects in order to add things together. They can see that they start with one number that goes through the tube into the basket and then when they place more manipulatives in the other tube it adds more manipulatives to the basket. Students can work in teams in order to count the total of the items in the basket and then write addition number sentences to display what they did. This acitivity is hands on and allows the students to see what addition is. For example, time and time again teachers are always just telling students that addition is when we add things together and get a bigger number. Simply saying this to a student is not going to teach them what addition is. Doing an activity like the one above where the students are physically using manipulatives and actually seeing the addition take place is what they need in order to fully understand. For most students seeing an addition number sentence written on paper is NOT enough. They need to understand what 5 + 5 = 10 really looks like, not just what it looks like written as an addition number sentence. In my future classroom I want to incorporate whole class activities like this one and individual class activities that allow students to be hands on and really explore the topic at hand.

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Rebecca Siegel's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:52 AM

I love this awesome game!  Thanks to Maddy, I think this game would be an awesome part of math centers for students when learning addition.  The easy to make game would be great for partners to play during rotating centers once they have been taught how to properly use it.  With hands on games and engaging activities, students are more likely to learn and retain information such as addition facts.