Contemporary Learning Design
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Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Education and Tech Tools
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How Teaching Mindfulness Benefits Learning - InformED

How Teaching Mindfulness Benefits Learning - InformED | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it
It's no secret that social and emotional well-being can directly influence academic outcomes. When we are in tune with our emotions, we pay attention to

Via Becky Roehrs
James J. Goldsmith's insight:

From the article:  "We now know that neuroplasticity allows us to make profound changes in the way  our bodies and minds function at any age. So helping students learn to train  their bodies and minds through the use of mindful awareness practices can make a  real and lasting difference."  Some interesting points raised (and how would things be different if we all paused 2 seconds to think before responding to someone?)

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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, March 8, 2015 10:18 PM

Mindfulness supports social-emotional learning (SEL),


This article defines mindfulness and provides quick summaries of 6 research studies that found a range of k-12 students benefited from mindfulness activities, weeks after the research study ended.


Plus, the article highlights six different activities you can use with your students: http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/contemplative-pedagogy/

Joan Serrat's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:01 AM

Com promocionar el mindfulness

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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On the MOOC Challenge to Traditional Higher Education | Jonathan Marks - Commentary Magazine

On the MOOC Challenge to Traditional Higher Education | Jonathan Marks - Commentary Magazine | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

In a recent Minding the Campus essay, Benjamin Ginsberg, professor of political science at Johns Hopkins, worries about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). …  Ginsberg, though he has no beef with smaller online classes, is among the denouncers of MOOCs. … he does fear that cost-cutting administrators at other institutions will happily embrace a “curriculum in which students watch canned lectures and take computer-graded exams.” Such students “would receive a paltry and pathetic education.”


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, July 2, 2013 5:24 AM

As a course of action, Jonathan Marks reports, Ginsburg proposes to withstand the MOOCification of curricula. Part of it is to name and shame professors who teach courses through MOOCs and their schools. Marks finds this advice wanting and suggests we first set out to 'think more seriously about the merits and limits of MOOCs'. His argument for why we should do so, is strong. Unfortunately, the article is weak on fleshing out this point of evidence gathering. Marks propagates what is approaching the status of an urban myth, that we know very little about the learning effects of online learning. This is simply not true. Distance teaching universities have researched media use for at least 25 years (cf. http://sco.lt/7jAgoT). But closer to home for Jonathan Marks, in 2009 already Barbara Means and co-workers published a meta-study that resulted from "A systematic search of the research literature from 1996 through July 2008. [It] identified more than a thousand empirical studies of online learning" (http://tiny.cc/n15kzw). And then there is the study by William Bowen Marks himself discusses. 

 

So there is evidence but, as Tony Bates among others has pointed out, it is the wrong kind of evidence. In these studies a course taught through different media, say face-to-face and purely online, is studied for differences in learning effects. The aim is to attribute the superior learning results of either one version of the course to the medium through which it has been taught. However, 'medium' is not a genuine single factor, it bundles a lot of differences under one rubric. So face-to-face is about a particular professor with a particular teaching style, a particular class size, particular means to support his or her teaching, etc. Similarly, online is about a particular LMS or VLE, about a particular quality of the resources, a particular instructional design behind the online course, etc. As Tony Bates puts it; "… different media can be used to assist learners to learn in different ways and achieve different outcomes" (http://tiny.cc/5t6kzw). 

 

In my opinion, therefore, if we want to know about the merits and demerits of MOOCs, we need to follow a design-based approach. We need to pick a particular course to turn into a MOOC, then develop an appropriate instructional design for it and improve that in a number of cycles. Only then we can start asking questions about effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, accessibility and the like. We may never be able to say in an unqualified way that the MOOC version of a course is as good as or worse than the face-to-face version. "It depends" should be the answer, and the real knowledge resides in what it depends on. Critics and evangelists of MOOCs alike will have to make do with this, anything else would amount to deceiving themselves. (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
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Adult Education Research: Where’s the Money?

Adult Education Research:  Where’s the Money? | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

Interestingly, major American foundations have contributed millions of dollars to innovative delivery platforms such as Coursera and Udacity. As a result, millions have enrolled in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), with an average class size of about 50,000. Yet, according to a recent study by Katy Jordon, less than 10 percent of learners complete current MOOC courses, and the majority of completion rates are in the two to eight percent range. Does this sound like effective adult education? No higher education institution would be able to attract applicants if it posted attrition rates of 92 to 98 percent.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 9, 2013 4:05 PM

Are MOOCs draining the foundation grant money pool leaving us without significant new research on adult learning?


How can we call a course with 98% attrition effective?

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from TELT
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e-Learning Symposium 2014 Live stream | LLAS


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Shona Whyte's curator insight, January 23, 2014 6:32 AM

Live streaming of plenaries today and tomorrow: Jozef Colpaert, Joe Dale, Huw Davies, Marina Orsini-Jones

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
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Exploring Online Discussions - Raw research notes and article annotations

Abstract (pasted from AERA 2013 program)

This study investigated relationships between how students “listen” (access existing posts) and “speak” (contribute posts) in asynchronous online discussions. Eleven variables indexing four dimensions of student’s listening (breadth, depth, temporal contiguity and revisitation) and five variables indexing three dimensions of students’ speaking (discursiveness, depth of content, and reflectivity) were calculated for 31 students participating in six week-long online discussions as part of an undergraduate educational psychology course. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the breadth of students’ listening (the percentage of peers’ posts viewed) predicted both the responsiveness and argumentative quality of their posts, but the depth with which they attended to the posts (time spent viewing) did not. Implications for the theory and practice of online discussions are discussed.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 6, 2013 12:12 AM

Interesting archive of research notes on an important topic. 

CAEXI BEST's curator insight, June 7, 2013 8:28 PM
Exploration Discussions en ligne - notes de recherche premières et de l'article annotations
Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
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The Future of Gamification | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

The Future of Gamification | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it
Game mechanics like rewards and feedback loops are gaining ground in digital life and many experts think they will spread widely to key domains like education and health by 2020. Others worry about a darker side.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 17, 2013 11:22 PM

Full text research report can be read online or downloaded via pdf.

Toby Coop's curator insight, March 19, 2013 6:55 AM
Full text research report can be read online or downloaded via pdf.