Contemporary Learning Design
2.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Creative teaching and learning
Scoop.it!

A virtual analysis

A virtual analysis | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

"A new analysis of four blended-format courses taught last fall offers practical guidance for faculty members interested in fresh pedagogical approaches ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
James J. Goldsmith's insight:

From the article:  "The pilot study led by the Bok Center for Teaching and Learning and released today after months of checks and balances showed that students responded most to lesson structure and execution, placed a premium on person-to-person interaction, and found redundancies between in-class and online instruction."  Worth reading if you are involved in blended learning design, development or deployment.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Why Aren't Students Completing MOOCs?

Infographic: Why Aren't Students Completing MOOCs? | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

MOOCs (free online courses that are open to anyone) are more popular than Justin Bieber right now, but why aren't students finishing the courses they signed up for?


Via SusanBat , Dominique Demartini, Pierre Levy, juandoming, Mark Smithers, Dennis T OConnor
more...
Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 24, 2013 10:29 PM

I was one of the 36% of students who completed the Equine Nutrition course. I can tell you why I was able to... It was because there was excellent support from the lecturers, easy to access video lectures, no hard deadlines until the end of the course, meaning there was much more flexibility for people, like me, who work full time and can't always complete quizzes by 6pm each Monday for example. I could do it in my own time, as long as I stayed within the course duration and I found that some weeks I had much more time and could complete 2 weeks worth of readings & quizzes. 

In contrast, I just attempted to complete an Animal Behaviour course, but unfortunately due to hard deadlines each Monday, I was unable to complete quizzes on time and therefore could not achieve the marks necessary to pass, so I gave up halfway through. I have still completed readings and watched lectures, but with no result as the quizzes did not count after the weekly hard deadlines. Obviously many people had the same issue as me, because out of 24950, only

1428 people completed the course.

I believe course designers need to revisit their courses and ensure they are flexible enough for full time workers to do in their own time. 

Christine Aizpurua's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

Me ! 

Patricia Christian's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:45 AM

An integral part of any online learning environment is the social synergy created via communication and discussion.  This is where deep reflection and learning take place.  Are students not feeling connected.  Are they collaborating and creating something new with the knowledge they have gained and sharing it with others?  Learning must me meaningful and applicable.

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Online Classes Fuel a Campus Debate - NYTimes.com

Online Classes Fuel a Campus Debate - NYTimes.com | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

Now a new discussion has begun about whether universities should collaborate to develop and share their courses and technology, rather than working with outside providers. This week, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, a group of provosts from Big 10 universities, issued a position paper saying that higher education must take advantage of new education technology — but perhaps on its own. On a small scale, C.I.C. members’ CourseShare program already does that, with members sharing classes in less commonly taught languages.


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

Costs of Teaching Online Classes | Andrew Erlichson - 10genEducation

There are two sets of costs to running online classes: the capital cost of buying the equipment and the variable cost of the labor. In this analysis, I am going to look at first year cash costs. The capital equipment can be amortized over multiple years in a true accounting analysis.  

 

The economics of online education are amazingly good. There is at least an order of magnitude improvement over the costs of teaching in person.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:06 AM

For everybody contemplating to get into the business of teaching online, using a MOOC-like set-up with videotaped lectures, this is a must read. Although lots of things may be done differently - more cheaply  or more costly, with a different way of amortising the capital equipment, with different numbers of students, with different equipment - the figures amassed here are very useful. But it is not just the figures themselves that are useful, so are the choice of equipment and the kinds of activities that have been taken into account (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

The dirty little secret of online learning: Students are bored and dropping out | Todd Tauber - Quartz

The dirty little secret of online learning: Students are bored and dropping out | Todd Tauber - Quartz | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

If they do that, they’ll see that digital learning needs to become much more mobile, personal and social. .. Mobile content, then, needs to be “bite-sized,” visually stimulating and interactive. … Taking a cue from Twitter and LinkedIn, education online also needs to do a better job leveraging peer interaction and collaboration. … mixes short videos and frequent assessments with facilitated group projects, asynchronous collaboration and innovative tools designed specifically to drive participation. 

 


Via Peter B. Sloep, Miloš Bajčetić
more...
verstelle's curator insight, March 24, 2013 6:28 AM

Indeed a misleading title and intro. After that it reads as a convincing look into the near future, where the best online learning experiences will be extremely expensive to produce and offered by commercial universities and publishers.

Ainsley Stollar's curator insight, March 6, 2014 10:52 AM

This talks about different types of learning and how our generation uses digital learning to obtain knowledge instead of using books. It also talks about how education needs to link peers together in order to further them in their learning. This relates because it is trying to make people feel the need to learn again instead of just memorizing information and letting it go when it's no longer needed.

Sirkka Sariola's curator insight, June 7, 2014 6:05 PM

Artikkelin kirjoittaja pohtii, miksi niin monet ilmoittautuvat online-kursseille, mutta joko jättävät kurssin kesken tai eivät edes aloita sitä. Yksi syy hänen mukaansa on se, että kurssit ovat samoja vanhoja - vain siirrettynä digitaaliseen muotoon. “education lags 30 years behind most of the world, and 50 years behind Silicon Valley.” Kursseissa ei oteta huomioon sen kummemmin teknologian kuin sen käyttäjien muuttumista viimeisinä vuosina.  Lainaus puhuu puolestaan.


Hän tekee myös ehdotuksia asioista, joihin pitäisi kiinnittää huomiota ja joita pitäisi muuttaa, jotta tämän sukupolven digitaalisen median käyttäjät saataisiin innostumaan online-kursseista ja opiskelusta. Mielenkiintoista luettavaa.

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

The End of History and The Last MOOCs | Stefan Popenici - popenici

The End of History and The Last MOOCs  | Stefan Popenici - popenici | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

Francis Fukuyama wrote in 1997 “The End of History and The Last Man”, a book that became soon extremely popular and so influential that some say that international policies were shaped at that time by the strange vision promoted by the author. … It became clear that taking this as a vision for the future was a colossal mistake.  … The current discourse and most visible debates in education currently take the same dangerous path of shallow analysis, tendentiousness, twist of facts to fit an agenda and stay relaxed with the suppression of alternative perspectives.


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 18, 2013 11:35 AM

Fukuyama's book was very influential - he claimed that history had come to an end with the arrival of democratic societies routed in neo-liberal economic views - but in retrospect also very wrong. Stefan Popenici claims that the MOOC debate suffers from the same short-comings as did Fukuyama. In the MOOC debate,  facts only seem to matter "if they serve a well funded and professionally promoted agenda." Stefan mentions Pearson as an example (see my earlier scooped quote of Matthew Poyiadgi, a Pearson executive, who in a sweeping statement called all universities in Europe and Asia mediocre (http://sco.lt/62bkm1 ). Tunnel vision and group think leads many organisations to the mistaken believe that debates online higher education essentially are debates about the pros and cons of MOOCs, Stefan claims.

 

Analogising MOOC debates with the debates that surrounded Fukuyama's book, results in an unorthodox view of MOOCs. But it is a view well worth taking the time to ingest, precisely because it challenges the orthodoxy about MOOCs, precisely because it questions what already seems to have become received wisdom about MOOCs. It is troubling to see how some academics, who as professionals in their respective fields practice scrutiny and carefully discriminate between fact and opinion, when it comes to MOOCs and online learning so often act as if they don't have these skills. (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Innovations in e-Learning
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Learning Technologies | An Open Course From the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness – January 21 – April 15, 2014

An Open Course From the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching Effectiveness – January 21 – April 15, 2014

Via k3hamilton
James J. Goldsmith's insight:

FYI: An invitation to join an open online course (OOC) offered by the University of Saskatchewan. Topics include: blogs, podcasts, Twitter, YouTube, creative commons and related topics.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

On the MOOC Challenge to Traditional Higher Education | Jonathan Marks - Commentary Magazine

On the MOOC Challenge to Traditional Higher Education | Jonathan Marks - Commentary Magazine | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

In a recent Minding the Campus essay, Benjamin Ginsberg, professor of political science at Johns Hopkins, worries about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). …  Ginsberg, though he has no beef with smaller online classes, is among the denouncers of MOOCs. … he does fear that cost-cutting administrators at other institutions will happily embrace a “curriculum in which students watch canned lectures and take computer-graded exams.” Such students “would receive a paltry and pathetic education.”


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, July 2, 2013 5:24 AM

As a course of action, Jonathan Marks reports, Ginsburg proposes to withstand the MOOCification of curricula. Part of it is to name and shame professors who teach courses through MOOCs and their schools. Marks finds this advice wanting and suggests we first set out to 'think more seriously about the merits and limits of MOOCs'. His argument for why we should do so, is strong. Unfortunately, the article is weak on fleshing out this point of evidence gathering. Marks propagates what is approaching the status of an urban myth, that we know very little about the learning effects of online learning. This is simply not true. Distance teaching universities have researched media use for at least 25 years (cf. http://sco.lt/7jAgoT). But closer to home for Jonathan Marks, in 2009 already Barbara Means and co-workers published a meta-study that resulted from "A systematic search of the research literature from 1996 through July 2008. [It] identified more than a thousand empirical studies of online learning" (http://tiny.cc/n15kzw). And then there is the study by William Bowen Marks himself discusses. 

 

So there is evidence but, as Tony Bates among others has pointed out, it is the wrong kind of evidence. In these studies a course taught through different media, say face-to-face and purely online, is studied for differences in learning effects. The aim is to attribute the superior learning results of either one version of the course to the medium through which it has been taught. However, 'medium' is not a genuine single factor, it bundles a lot of differences under one rubric. So face-to-face is about a particular professor with a particular teaching style, a particular class size, particular means to support his or her teaching, etc. Similarly, online is about a particular LMS or VLE, about a particular quality of the resources, a particular instructional design behind the online course, etc. As Tony Bates puts it; "… different media can be used to assist learners to learn in different ways and achieve different outcomes" (http://tiny.cc/5t6kzw). 

 

In my opinion, therefore, if we want to know about the merits and demerits of MOOCs, we need to follow a design-based approach. We need to pick a particular course to turn into a MOOC, then develop an appropriate instructional design for it and improve that in a number of cycles. Only then we can start asking questions about effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, accessibility and the like. We may never be able to say in an unqualified way that the MOOC version of a course is as good as or worse than the face-to-face version. "It depends" should be the answer, and the real knowledge resides in what it depends on. Critics and evangelists of MOOCs alike will have to make do with this, anything else would amount to deceiving themselves. (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

The MOOC bubble and the attack on public education | Aaron Bady - Academic Matters

The MOOC bubble and the attack on public education | Aaron Bady - Academic Matters | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

MOOCs are, and will be, big business, and the way that their makers see profitability at the end of the tunnel is what gives them their particular shape. … the MOOCs which are now being developed by Silicon Valley startups … aim to do exactly the same thing that traditional courses have always done -transfer course content from expert to student - only to do so massively more cheaply and on a much larger scale. … MOOCs are simply a new way of maintaining the status quo, of re-institutionalizing higher education in an era of budget cuts, skyrocketing tuition, and unemployed college graduates burdened by student debt. … the California legislature proposes to solve a real systemic crisis - collapsing public resources, diminishing affordability, and falling completion rates in the state’s higher education system - by sending its students to MOOCs. … If this bill passes, the winners will be Silicon Valley and the austerity hawks in the California legislature … To put it quite bluntly, MOOCs are a speculative bubble, a product being pumped up and overvalued by pro-business government support and a lot of hot air in the media. Like all speculative bubbles—especially those that originate in Silicon Valley—it will eventually burst. 


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, June 10, 2013 11:31 AM

This article does not really sing a song that is much different from the song sung by many other opponents of MOOCs. However, it does so quite elegantly and forcefully. For that reason alone it is worth reading.

 

MOOC proponents have never shied away from making bold predications, like Sebastian Thrun who predicted that "Fifty years from now there will be only 10 institutions in the whole world that deliver higher education" (http://tiny.cc/83ygyw). Aaron faces them squarely when he claims that "MOOCs are a speculative bubble … [which] will eventually burst". I would hope it does, in the way he describes them as affecting Californian HE. I hope too, though, that the discovery of distance teaching that MOOCs exemplify, has a lasting effect, by making people reflect on the pedagogy, organisation and economics of (higher) education. (@pbsloep)

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Adult Education Research: Where’s the Money?

Adult Education Research:  Where’s the Money? | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

Interestingly, major American foundations have contributed millions of dollars to innovative delivery platforms such as Coursera and Udacity. As a result, millions have enrolled in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), with an average class size of about 50,000. Yet, according to a recent study by Katy Jordon, less than 10 percent of learners complete current MOOC courses, and the majority of completion rates are in the two to eight percent range. Does this sound like effective adult education? No higher education institution would be able to attract applicants if it posted attrition rates of 92 to 98 percent.


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 9, 2013 4:05 PM

Are MOOCs draining the foundation grant money pool leaving us without significant new research on adult learning?


How can we call a course with 98% attrition effective?

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype - Technology | Steve Kolowich- The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Professors Behind the MOOC Hype - Technology | Steve Kolowich- The Chronicle of Higher Education | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

What is it like to teach 10,000 or more students at once, and does it really work? The largest-ever survey of professors who have taught MOOCs, or massive open online courses, shows that the process is time-consuming, but, according to the instructors, often successful. Nearly half of the professors felt their online courses were as rigorous academically as the versions they taught in the classroom.

 

The survey, conducted by The Chronicle, attempted to reach every professor who has taught a MOOC. The online questionnaire was sent to 184 professors in late February, and 103 of them responded.

 


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 18, 2013 5:27 PM

These are data from the people in the trenches. And although they are biased - typically those with good experiences react, those with bad ones reportedly didn't - they still show that there is a good deal of enthusiasm about teaching a MOOC and that many sceptics to online learning became converted. Motives reported ranged from altruism to not wanting to be left behind, but that was to be expected. For a quick impression of the results, check the charts. 

 

Since many of the respondents still were in the midst of teaching their MOOC, we should see the present picture as a snap-shot only. But the good thing is that now we at least have such a snap-shot. The Chronicle is to be applauded for this initiative. (@pbsloep)