Contemporary Landscape Photography
154 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Driving by Forever Wild | d a v e h e b b . c o m

Driving by Forever Wild | d a v e h e b b . c o m | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it
Driving by Forever Wild Photographic Series 2008 - 2012 (ongoing)   Scenes captured while driving by Forever Wild (a.k.a. the Catskill Forest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Cole Whitworth - Gateway to the The Golden Isles

Cole Whitworth - Gateway to the The Golden Isles | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it

Highway 17 starts in Winchester, Virginia and travels south all the way to Punta Gorda, Florida. The roadway spans 1,189 miles and passes in and out of many towns along the way. This highway was used to travel up and down most of the eastern coastline before I-95 came about in the 1950’s and 60’s. It reflected the era of 1950’s travel motor homes and hotels, Victorian structures and WWII-era Liberty Shipworks. Since then, use of Highway 17 has greatly declined and it shows.

The highway acts as the gateway to the “The Golden Isles,” which includes Sea Island, Jekyll and St. Simons, as well as a way to get to historic Brunswick in southern Georgia. As a result of the great decline in use, the highway now showcases the effects of poor urban planning: along with ugly billboards, poorly-laid-out intersections, ruined and abandoned buildings, and clutter that doesn’t display or reflect the beauty of the coastal marshes and waterways all around you.

By documenting the area with the use of large format photography, my goal with this work was to show the structures along the highway that give evidence as to why there needs to be a focus on preserving and re-building Coastal Highway 17 as it enters and exits the city of Brunswick, GA. I focused on showing the poor use of land, the deserted buildings, the pollution sites and other eyesores that conflict with how the area should be organized. The city of Brunswick and Highway 17 stand as a model for so many other cities all across the United States that have the same problems and a need for preserving the historic and scenic qualities of these gateways.

– Cole Whitworth, Savannah, Georgia, USA

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Alberta Tar Sands photographed by Ashley Cooper

Alberta Tar Sands photographed by Ashley Cooper | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it

Once this landscape was a pristine wilderness roamed by deer now it's 'the most destructive industrial project on earth'

Lush green forests once blanketed an area of the Tar Sands at Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada, larger than EnglandArea where blackened earth now stands dubbed by environmentalists as most destructive industrial project on earthBoreal forest - once home to grizzly bears, moose and bison - is vanishing at rate second to Amazon deforestation

 

These incredible pictures show the bleak landscape of bitumen, sand and clay created by the frantic pursuit of 173billion barrels of untouched oil.

The Tar Sands in Alberta, Canada, are the world's third largest oil reserve - but lush green forests once blanketed an area there larger than England.

The region where the blackened earth now stands has been dubbed as the most destructive industrial project on earth by shocked environmentalists.

Amazing scene: Oil floats on the surface of an unlined tailings pond which holds waste water from tar sands processing in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada

Aerial view: The Tar Sands in Alberta, Canada, are the third largest oil reserve in the world - but lush green forests once blanketed an area there larger than England

Millions of barrels of tar sands oil have been extracted from underground - producing five times as many greenhouse gas emissions as normal extraction.

And the Boreal forest - once home to grizzly bears, moose, bison, deer and wolverines - is vanishing at a rate only second to Amazon deforestation.

Photographer Ashley Cooper said: ‘I knew a lot about the tar sands before I went there but nothing prepared me for the impact of actually seeing it.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2219240/Tar-Sands-Canada-worlds-largest-oil-reserve-173billion-untouched-barrels.html#ixzz2A2OoIa4C

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Dave Hebb's Pinterest board - New Landscape Photography

Dave Hebb's Pinterest board - New Landscape Photography | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it
Based loosely on the "New Topographics" photographers and the blog newlandscapephotography.com - the contemporary landscape is a dialogue between the unchecked growth and decay of nature and the built environment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Emelie Johansson

Emelie Johansson | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it

My photographs explore the interconnectedness of place and sense of self. Through self-portraiture and landscape photography, I explore the symbolic relationship between the mind and the land, documenting the journey and struggle of connecting to place.

I’m interested in the way the landscape shapes our sense of the familiar, of home, self, and family as it functions as a container of memories. Scholars in various disciplines have differing definitions of the term “sense of place,” however, I’m primarily interested in the idea that having a “sense of place” may allow us to belong to a place momentarily even though it is not “our” place. It allows me to connect to nature and cultures that are not my own or reconnect with a familiar place. I find my relationship to place to be unstable, not constant, and always changing. I connect and disconnect.

My work is derived from my process of making a home in an unfamiliar place, driven by my transition between two countries and cultures, Sweden and the United States. Recurring themes in my work address psychological struggles of isolation, displacement, and longing as they relate to my ability to understand, own or accept a specific site. The resulting photographs shows how place can be absent or unavailable and how the search for “home” is a mythical search, filled with tension and anxiety but also moments of solace and peace.

– Emelie Johansson, Greencastle, Indiana, USA

 

www.EmelieJohansson.se

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Deb Hall

Deb Hall | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it
The open road has long been synonymous with freedom. We lose a piece of that freedom when our ability as individuals to experience our natural world is diminished by development, private ownership and restricted access. Living in a state of climate change denial we bury our faces in screens and further distance ourselves from nature. Ultimately, our habits shape our habitat. Possession, consumption and the impact of our habits on our natural resources and wildlife are the focus of my latest work. During the fall I returned, after thirty years, to the Columbia River Basin: my homeland as well as a major natural resource. Hiking, camping, and documenting throughout the Columbia River Basin, this exploration began on the Columbia River at the Bonneville Dam and ended at the Columbia Ice Fields in British Columbia. An archive of nine thousand photographs, taken during this period, is being used to create a large body of work.

The Columbia River Basin serves as an apt metaphor for issues that will hold deeper challenges for humanity as we consume ever more water, energy, space and food. Humans require the development of new systems to generate power (windmills, dams, nuclear and corresponding grids), land for agriculture, habitation, transportation, and nuclear waste disposal sites. Against this surging tide, wildlife competes for space, carving out ever-smaller habitats and migration routes.

This ongoing body of work focuses on the universality of these issues. How does the use of digital photography affect our perception of our habitat and how do changes in our habitat affect photography? The odd relationship of these two distinct worlds inhabits the work. The digital technologies we find ourselves engrossed in distance us from nature and our vital resources. Photographic landscapes and wildlife conveniently viewed on screen are virtual artifacts. Human development only ratchets one way and our environment is essential to our survival. As Henry David Thoreau observed, “ We have constructed a fate, an Atropos, that never turns aside.“ As an artist, this startling personal experience has inspired a fascinating study in photographic theory, environment and history, questioning how digital technology shapes our experience with nature and adding to the discussion of how we balance our precious resources with consumption.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

David Maisel :: Photography :: The Mining Project: The Mining Project

David Maisel :: Photography :: The Mining Project: The Mining Project | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it

David Maisel's fascinating aerial photos of minining operations show both formal beauty and reveal the underlying destruction of industrial mining operations from a macro view.

 

The Mining Project had its genesis in 1983, when I began photographing open pit mines from the air. After witnessing the clear-cutting of forests in the Pacific Northwest while photographing the volcano Mount St Helens, I began to consider other ways that human activity transforms the land through industrial effort. In addition, I was captivated by Robert Smithson’s proposals for viewing platforms in the base of abandoned mines.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Scott Conarroe - ANONYMOUS EARTHWORKS

Scott Conarroe - ANONYMOUS EARTHWORKS | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it

Incredible work by Scott Conarroe - all of this series and most of the others blow me away...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dave Hebb
Scoop.it!

Liminal Landscapes | d a v e h e b b . c o m

Liminal Landscapes | d a v e h e b b . c o m | Contemporary Landscape Photography | Scoop.it
Liminal Landscapes Photographic series 2008 - 2011 (ongoing)   lim•i•nal  |’limenl| adjective technical 1 of or relating to...
more...
No comment yet.