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Research and Applications in the field of Contemplative Neurofeedback.
Curated by Yeshe Dorje
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Finland is really good at stopping bullying. Here's how they're doing it. teaching bystanders to empathize and intervene.

Finland is really good at stopping bullying. Here's how they're doing it. teaching bystanders to empathize and intervene. | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

Bullying is awful, but a Finnish program is teaching bystanders to empathize and intervene.

 

"In the game, students can practice how to be nice to someone and what kind of nice things you can say to someone who would like to be included in the group or is new in the school," said Alanen.

 

By asking the kids what they would do in certain situations and giving feedback and advice about it, the program can help teach the students to be more empathetic and supportive of bullying victims. And the data shows that the program works too.

 

Juvonen's analysis found that KiVa reduced the odds of a given student being bullied by about one-third to one-half.

By James Gaines


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Forbes: Science Explains The Link Between Self-Compassion And Success

Forbes: Science Explains The Link Between Self-Compassion And Success | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

by Amy Morin

 

Treating yourself with kindness can enhance your performance.

 

Do you ever call yourself names? Do you replay your mistakes in your head over and over again? If so, you’re not alone. Harsh self-criticism is pretty common.

 

But beating yourself up for your mistakes and punishing yourself for your failures could backfire. Being too tough on yourself may actually hinder your performance. Multiple studies show that treating yourself with more kindness could be the best way to gain better results.


The Key Components of Self-Compassion


Amy Morin



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COUPLING: Discovering true empathy in your intimacy

COUPLING: Discovering true empathy in your intimacy | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

Coupling requires empathy. Understanding anchors almost every interaction. If we don’t have some perspective on ourselves and on our partner’s needs and wants, then our selfishness will block basic togetherness. And that’s our basic need and want -- togetherness. Togetherness fueled by understanding.

 

But we have a real problem in our culture with feelings. We don’t even know the language. Our wounded feeling function leads to emptiness, addiction and blame. Men are especially socialized to not have feelings. Anger seems to be the only one that is acceptable.

 

Empathy allows us to say, “If you’re going through it, I’m with you.”

Lack of empathy, or lack of feelings, blocks this closeness. If your other is going through something that you don’t understand, then it is difficult to help.


BRUCE CONN

Image: The Proposal" by William-Adolphe Bouguereau.

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Beyond mindfulness: how horse riding, eating your greens and going for a walk can help depression

Beyond mindfulness: how horse riding, eating your greens and going for a walk can help depression | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
Equine therapy has been shown to help nurture self-awareness and empathy

 

Not so long ago, if you had anxiety or depression, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was the answer. It was everywhere. Now mindfulness is even more ubiquitous.

 

And there is indeed much scientific evidence for its benefits in treating depression, anxiety and addiction. But, as Rachel Boyd of the mental health charity Mind points out, “It’s not for everyone and there are lots of alternatives.” Before CBT, Freudian psychotherapy dominated. We’ve lumbered from digging up the roots of our problems, to solving issues by changing the way we think and behave with CBT, to learning to enjoy life how it is, through mindfulness.

 

But if none of the above appeal to you, that doesn’t mean it’s time to give up all hope of a calmer, brighter outlook. There are other options.


Solution-focused hypnotherapy...Breathing exercises...Exercise and diet...Creative therapies...Horse riding...

 

 




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Rebecca Drew's curator insight, February 22, 3:46 AM

This is so true - last year I met a man in his late 60s he had lost his wife and was "broken" his family against his wishes bought him a 12 week old puppy - a spaniel type - clearly needed walking every day ............ 1months on I see this guy and his dog out and about every Morning - the dog is so friendly he stops to talk to everyone - the owner is a changed person. 

 

If you aren't an animal lover though and you are feeling the pain of bereavement - hypnotherapy offers a gentle way to help ease some of your pain.

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Empathy and social skills: Everyone Should Be Required to See "Inside Out"

Empathy and social skills: Everyone Should Be Required to See "Inside Out" | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

 For example, Joy slowly recognized the power of empathy and Sadness' role in that regard.

 

Empathy involves understanding another person's situation from their perspective. As such, you must be able to place yourself in someone else's shoes and feel what they are feeling and without judging them. According to Dr. Brene Brown, Ph.D., LMSW, "empathy moves us to a place of courage and compassion. Through it, we come to realize that our perspective is not the perspective."

 

"Empathy is what makes us human" and yet it is in such limited supply these days, as are other aspects of emotional intelligence (EQ). Social and emotional skills such as empathy are also essential to conflict resolution. According to Daniel Goleman, emotional intelligence consists of self-awareness, managing emotions, empathy and social skills. The good news is that "emotional intelligence competencies are learned - and can be improved at any point in life."

 

"Inside Out" touched upon the fact that people are constantly judging us for everything we do and say and how we react to being judged. It should be noted that empathy is incompatible with shame and judgment.

 

Mark Baer



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Edwin Rutsch's comment, July 17, 2015 12:21 AM
Mark, it was very well received on our Facebook page ! https://www.facebook.com/EmpathyCenter
Mark Brian Baer's comment, July 17, 2015 12:27 AM
I saw :-)
Annie M Herbert's curator insight, July 17, 2015 9:18 AM

Fantastic movie. Share with Julie.

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Sensitive People Aren't Weak, They're Actually Natural-Born Leaders: You can’t lead without empathy.

Sensitive People Aren't Weak, They're Actually Natural-Born Leaders: You can’t lead without empathy. | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

Sensitivity is perhaps the most underrated quality in the world. It’s too often associated with fragility and weakness when it’s actually a tremendous strength.

Sensitive people are insightful and intelligent enough both to recognize and comprehend their own emotions. They’re also courageous enough to exhibit them in public.

Many of us would rather live in denial than acknowledge vulnerability. In turn, we never conquer our greatest fears and inner obstacles.

The world needs more people with sensitive souls, as they’re innately self-aware and empathetic. Individuals with these qualities are natural leaders.

 

John Haltiwanger

 


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Simon Awuyo's curator insight, July 10, 2015 7:03 AM

I want to find out more about myself in relation to this statement.

Oana Juncu's curator insight, July 11, 2015 3:28 AM

You cannot lead without empathy. End of the story ! 

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Compassion the answer to every problem, Dalai Lama says

Compassion the answer to every problem, Dalai Lama says | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
The Dalai Lama delivers an enthusiastic message on love and compassion to hundreds of people at the Brisbane Convention Centre.

 

Supporters of Shugden Buddhists staged a small but vocal protest, chanting "stop lying, false Dalai Lama" and waving placards.

 

An opposing group of protesters supporting the Dalai Lama stood on the other side of the road yelling: "We love the Dalai Lama."


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It seems some folks just haven't gotten the message....The Dorje Shugden controversy is a controversy over Dorje Shugden, also known as Dolgyal, whom some consider to be one of several protectors of the Gelug school, the school of Tibetan Buddhism to which the Dalai Lamas belong. Dorje Shugden has become the symbolic centre-point[1][web 1] of a conflict over the "purity"[2] of the Gelugpa school and the inclusion of non-Gelugpa teachings, especially Nyingma teachings.... the 14th Dalai Lama, a Gelugpa himself and advocate of an "inclusive" approach to the teachings of Tibetan Buddhism,[5][2] started to speak out against the practice of Dorje Shugden in 1978.
Protestants and Catholics all over again....lol.

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Childhood Trauma Leads to Brains Wired for Fear

Childhood Trauma Leads to Brains Wired for Fear | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
Last week, a report by the University of San Diego School of Law found that about 686,000 children were victims of abuse and neglect in 2013. T

 

raumatic childhood events can lead to mental health and behavioral problems later in life, explains psychiatrist and traumatic stress expert Bessel van der Kolk, author of the recently published book, The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma.

 

Children’s brains are literally shaped by traumatic experiences, which can lead to problems with anger, addiction, and even criminal activity in adulthood, says van der Kolk. Sound Medicine’s Barbara Lewis spoke with him about his book. 

 

 


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"Conservative brains" are wired for more fear based reactions than liberals. Does this mean that conservatives suffer from more childhood neglect and emotional abuse than children raised in liberal families?

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K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s comment, July 30, 2015 11:45 AM
Just one question and I am not coming from the race view but from the children view. The children of slaves were terrorized and traumatized beyond where I want to go or think they were not their own but property of the Master to do with as He saw fit. Now the Master was Liberalin view just as long as it was for his benefit and the slave children were used to purchase property/land and homes and much more for their masters gain not their own. The culture they had was endoctrinated by sheer abuse and brute force but not one of them ever was given a choice. The culture was done as the master say's or get beatin like a dog to the blood runs from their bodies and even for more punishment they were made to watch their parents and other slave members be hang by a neuce by the master with a word of if you ever think of doing thus and so you will surely be next. For some reason the government has not changed much and neither have the abuse of the children and a great deal of it is not in the home or culture environment and some children by law have to return back to the abusive environment and be abused or they or their parent go to jail by law. therefore my question is liberal parenting or not in the 21st century
K.I.R.M. God is Business " From Day One"'s comment, July 30, 2015 11:48 AM
Who has the true authority over your child(ren) you or the GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS Liberal or not? sorry did not get question in in previous post. WHO HAS THE FINAL SAY and what say do you have if your child(ren) are traumatized by the GOVERNMENT?
Ngozi Angeline Godwell's comment, August 14, 2015 9:17 AM
I quote:"In essence the kids live in a war zone and they get "bombed" and "shelled" and hurt and if they complain there will be more of the same. And on top of that you have "traps" that look innocent but are "gotchas" ! So - from the perspective of an abused kid - nothing, absolutely nothing can be trusted! A little story. A childless couple adopts a foster kid as they can't seem to have kids on their own. They encourage being called mom and dad! She now gets pregnant. The couple fears for their newborn and promptly send the kid back to foster hell! I ask: "You are surprised that they don't trust?". Dolphins are intelligent! We train them. Every human being is trained to live in their cultural matrix! And for abused kids it is enforced with inhuman punishment - not treats. You get what you put in! You put in hate and force and terror - you can't expect love! The kids see aggression and hate and force and brutality and that is their life experience? And if they saw "love" there was probably a trick to really set them up for failure. Gregory Bateson's book "Steps to an Ecology of Mind" touches on these issues.
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How the Brain Works with the Vagus with Stephen Porges

Can cultivating brain function help develop empathy? Here what Dr. Stephen Porges, PhD has to say.

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Everything you think you know about animals is wrong: How science is forcing us to reconsider the twin myths of human superiority and dumb creatures

Everything you think you know about animals is wrong: How science is forcing us to reconsider the twin myths of human superiority and dumb creatures | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
Human beings are the most intelligent, and therefore important, of all the world´s species, right?

 

We deserve our superior status over other animals because of the following scientific truths: that only humans are self-aware and feel empathy, that we are unique in our abilities to use language and tools, that only we can recognize ourselves in a mirror and understand the passing of time.

But advances in cognitive ethology (the scientific study of animal intelligence, emotions, behaviors, and social life) have now disproved these ´truths´, showing that many other creatures also display a complex range of emotions, highly evolved communication skills, compassion for others, and even intelligence that rivals- or surpasses- our own. These ground-breaking studies force us to ask some uncomfortable questions about our place in the world, and have caused leading experts to call for a radical rethink of the way we treat other animals...

 

Some of the most heart-warming tales of expressive love and empathy come from the great apes, our closest relatives. Moral philosopher Mark Rowlands recounts the following:

By: Sophie McAdam,


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Empathy Movement Update

Empathy Movement Update | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

http://facebook.com/EmpathyCenter/posts/965770523467610

We deployed the empathy tent yesterday in downtown Berkeley. We now ask people who support the empathy movement to take a photo holing up a sign of support. If you support the Movement, we invite you to make a sign and take a photo with it and post it to our Facebook page..

 

There was a protest in the evening against Berkeley creating more restrictive laws on the homeless. Instead of creating more laws and restrictions for the homeless in Berkeley, the empathy movement is advocating for more mutual empathy and dialog between all community members (i.e. homeless, business owners, activists, city officials, police and general public) and to mutually create solutions that foster connection, understanding, as well as, action that addresses everyone's concerns, needs and well-being.


Everyone's voice needs to be heard, considered and included. We propose an empathy conference on the issue to find creative solutions that emerge and grow out of dialog. Mutual and reciprocal community empathy is the gateway to creating solutions.

See the tent deployment schedule here.
http://facebook.com/events/550101135080912/
http://cultureofempathy.com/OccupyEmpathy/


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Hillary Clinton's second run for presidency seeks more empathy

The last time Hillary Clinton presented herself as a candidate for the most powerful job in America critics complained she was stiff, lacked a unifying messa...

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Study: Empathy and motivation for justice: Cognitive empathy and concern, but not emotional empathy, predict sensitivity to injustice for others

Study: Empathy and motivation for justice: Cognitive empathy and concern, but not emotional empathy, predict sensitivity to injustice for others | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
Jean Decety & Keith J. Yoder
Why do people tend to care for upholding principles of justice? This study examined the association between individual differences in the affective, motivational and cognitive components of empathy, sensitivity to justice, and psychopathy in participants (N 265) who were also asked to rate the permissibility of everyday moral situations that pit personal benefit against moral standards of justice. Counter to common sense, emotional empathy was not associated with sensitivity to injustice for others.

 

Rather, individual differences in cognitive empathy and empathic concern predicted sensitivity to justice for others, as well as the endorsement of moral rules. Psychopathy coldheartedness scores were inversely associated with motivation for justice. Moreover, hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis revealed that self-focused and other-focused orientations toward justice had opposing influences on the permissibility of moral judgments. High scores on psychopathy were associated with less moral condemnation of immoral behavior.

 

Together, these results contribute to a better understanding of the information processing mechanisms underlying justice motivation, and may guide interventions designed to foster justice and moral behavior. In order to promote justice motivation, it may be more effective to encourage perspective taking and reasoning than emphasizing emotional sharing with the misfortune of others.


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Psychopathy coldheartedness scores were inversely associated with motivation for justice. Moreover, hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis revealed that self-focused and other-focused orientations toward justice had opposing influences on the permissibility of moral judgments. High scores on psychopathy were associated with less moral condemnation of immoral behavior.

 

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A political system based on empathy

A political system based on empathy | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

So here's the dangerous new idea. What would it be like if our political chambers were based on the principles of empathizing? It is dangerous because it would mean a revolution in how we choose our politicians, how our political chambers govern, and how our politicians think and behave.


We have never given such an alternative political process a chance. Might it be better and safer than what we currently have? Since empathy is about keeping in mind the thoughts and feelings of other people (not just your own), and being sensitive to another person's thoughts and feelings (not just riding rough-shod over them), it is clearly incompatible with notions of "doing battle with the opposition" and "defeating the opposition" in order to win and hold on to power.


Simon Baron-Cohen
Psychologist, Autism Research Centre, Cambridge University; Author, The Science of Evil



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Stopping the Next Shooter: Could Teaching Kids Empathy and Mindfulness Really Help?

Stopping the Next Shooter: Could Teaching Kids Empathy and Mindfulness Really Help? | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

In recent years schools have been hyper-focused on academic assessment—and the result, some critics say, is too little emphasis on other needed skills, such as understanding and managing emotions, feeling and showing empathy for others, establishing and maintaining positive relationships, and making responsible decisions....

 

The thinking is that when children are taught about emotions such as empathy and sharing through SEL programs, and encouraged to practice those thoughts and behaviors, they end up getting that good feeling we’re wired to get. The goal: Everyone in the class wants to repeat these pro-social behaviors, so these become the fallback position, transforming the classroom into a caring environment.


By M. V. Wood


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With Reactions, Facebook Supercharges The Like Button With 6 Empathetic Emoji

With Reactions, Facebook Supercharges The Like Button With 6 Empathetic Emoji | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

In September, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg made some waves when he hinted Facebook was working on a way to expand its famous Like button — not by adding the much-fabled “dislike” option, but by making it way more empathetic, expressing sadness and other emotions.

 

Today, Facebook is taking the wraps off what form the new Like may take. It is rolling out “Reactions,” a new set of six emoji that will sit alongside the original thumbs-up to let users quickly respond with love, laughter, happiness, shock, sadness and anger.

 

 by Ingrid Lunden 

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Study: Reduced Empathy Seen In Anxious People

Study: Reduced Empathy Seen In Anxious People | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

People who are anxious have reduced ability to empathize with others, new research says.


In their study, a team of researchers led by Andrew Todd from University of Iowa artificially increased the anxiety levels of one group of participants by having them remember events in their lives that had caused them anxiety.


The researchers told another group to remember incidents that were emotionally neutral, as well as ones that induced anger or disgust.

In the first of two tests, the participants were examined for their capacity to see things from other people's perspective. The researchers showed them a photo of a man seated at a table with a book to his left, or the participants' right.


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4 Steps To Build The Empathy Muscle - For You, For Me, For Everyone!

4 Steps To Build The Empathy Muscle - For You, For Me, For Everyone! | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

We All Are Capable Of Empathy.. But How Often Do We Use It?

I was reading a beautiful article about empathy the other day and it inspired me to share a few of my own thoughts about it. Empathy! We all know we are capable of it, how often do we really use it? For all those times in a day that demands it, we have somehow developed the ability to ignore and not empathise.

It is as if majority of the population consists of self obsessed and self involved people that we are running short of empathy every day...


Here are a few ways we can develop a bit of empathy and be better humans.

Stop judging...Everybody does what they want ultimately. ..Just like you do. Respect that...Listen before you speak...


by Vinay Nagaraju


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Empathy: The Science of Feeling. Do You Have Enough Empathy to Reach Your Full UX Potential

Our presenters will explore how recent advances in brain science and empathic competency may offer practice owners and businesses measurable ways to hire and cultivate individuals who can make a true difference in the success of their products and teams.


The two will share findings from their 2015 survey of more than 500 practitioners throughout Europe, Canada and the United States on the importance of empathy in designing informational environments. 

 

1. EMPATHY: SCIENCE OF FEELING UXPA 2015 | June 25, 2015 Bern Irizarry @bernirizarry bern@empathyux.com Emma Chittenden @emchi emma@empathyux.com


2. Where we started Our journey began in London…


3. Bernadette Irizarry CEO and Founder VLVT / Velvet Hammer @bernirizarry Emma Chittenden CEO Oubliette @emchi

 

4. SOFT @bernirizarry, @emchi SKILL

 

5. EMPATHY @bernirizarry, @emchi DEFICIT

 

6. What is empathy? Is it “real”? Is it scientific?

 

7. @bernirizarry, @emchi Baron-Cohen, Simon. Zero Degrees of Empathy, 2011 TEDxHouses of Parliament - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXcU8x_xK18

 

Bernadette Irizarry and Emma Chittenden


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Empathy and motivation for justice: Cognitive empathy and concern, but not emotional empathy, predict sensitivity to injustice for others

Empathy and motivation for justice: Cognitive empathy and concern, but not emotional empathy, predict sensitivity to injustice for others | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
Why do people tend to care for upholding principles of justice? This study examined the association between individual differences in the affective, motivational and cognitive components of empathy, sensitivity to justice, and psychopathy in participants (N 265) who were also asked to rate the permissibility of everyday moral situations that pit personal benefit against moral standards of justice.


Counter to common sense, emotional empathy was not associated with sensitivity to injustice for others. Rather, individual differences in cognitive empathy and empathic concern predicted sensitivity to justice for others, as well as the endorsement of moral rules. 


Jean Decety

Keith J. Yoder



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Study: Specific electrophysiological components disentangle affective sharing and empathic concern in psychopathy

Study: Specific electrophysiological components disentangle affective sharing and empathic concern in psychopathy | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

Empathic impairment is one of the hallmarks of psychopathy, a personality dimension associated with poverty in affective reactions, lack of attachment to others, and a callous disregard for the feelings, rights, and welfare of others.


Neuroscience research on the relation between empathy and psychopathy has predominately focused on the affective sharing and cognitive components of empathy in forensic populations, and much less on empathic concern.


The current study used high-density electroencephalography in a community sample to examine the spatiotemporal neurodynamic responses when viewing people in physical distress under two subjective contexts: one evoking affective sharing, the other, empathic concern.


Jean Decety, Kimberly L Lewis, Jason M Cowell

image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Bundy



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I have often referred to the Republicans as psychopaths, the is not hyperbole, I mean it quite literally... Empathic impairment is one of the hallmarks of psychopathy, a personality dimension associated with poverty in affective reactions, lack of attachment to others, and a callous disregard for the feelings, rights, and welfare of others.

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A Compassionate Work Culture Can Really Benefit The Bottom Line, Too

A Compassionate Work Culture Can Really Benefit The Bottom Line, Too | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

While the idea has previous been labeled "touchy-feely" and quickly discarded, creating an emotionally positive work culture can boast big benefits for both customers and employees, according to a new study from researchers at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and the George Mason University School of Business.

 

They found a clear, positive correlation between compassionate behavior, work satisfaction and company success. Their results were recently published in the journal Administrative Science Quarterly.


In the study, researchers Sigal Barsade and Olivia O’Neill focused on exploring the idea of a compassionate love culture, which they describe as the following in their report:

By Alena Hall

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‘Design empathy’ builds inclusive spaces for people with autism

‘Design empathy’ builds inclusive spaces for people with autism | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it


by ALEX BOZIKOVIC

Architects and researchers are increasingly turning their attention to the creation of comfortable school and work spaces for those on the autism spectrum

 

There was very little research available on the topic, so Paron-Wildes conducted her own, developing guidelines for architects and helping design facilities for children with autism. But she also finds “design empathy,” as she puts it, valuable in the offices she designs with her day job. “We have a range of human spectrums,” she says.'


 the diversity among the population of people might, and should, generate a deeper and more empathetic way of thinking about how everyone experiences a space


#Empathy Movement Magazine


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Sync Gaming Make Kids More Empathic

Sync Gaming Make Kids More Empathic | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it
Physical activity performed together in unison could increase the empathy of kids as it helps children feel more positively toward one another.

 

Researchers have found that a physical activity performed together in unison or even a video game played together in sync on a computer could increase the empathy of kids as it helps children feel more positively toward one another.

 

The study showed that eight-year-olds reported a greater sense of similarity and closeness immediately after playing the video game in sync, those who played the same game but not in a synchronous way did not report the same increase in connection.

 

“Synchrony is like a glue that brings people together — it is a magical connector for people,” said lead author Tal-Chen Rabinowitch, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington.

Tal-Chen Rabinowitch, Ph.D.

http://ilabs.washington.edu/postdoctoral-fellows/bio/i-labs-tal-chen-rabinowitch-phd


Culture of Empathy Builder: Tal-Chen Rabinowitch
 http://bit.ly/KQZRY5


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Emotional IQ strongest predictor of workplace performance: study

Emotional IQ strongest predictor of workplace performance: study | ContemplativeNeurofeedback | Scoop.it

The ability to perceive and empathise with the emotions of others may be one of the most defining features of humanity. When we can perceive and empathise, we feel what they are feeling and can work together from this platform of understanding.

 

"Our self comes to include the people we become close to," said the authors on a recent empathy study. "If a friend is under threat, it becomes the same as if we ourselves are under threat. We can understand the pain or difficulty they may be going through in the same way we understand our own pain."

by Sarah Berry


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Yeshe Dorje's insight:

What libertarians often miss with their emphases on extreme individualism, we are human animals not robots. We live in communities and are social, more akin to Bonobos, not orangutangs.

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