Constructal Law of Design in Nature
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Qualified Citations of 'constructal' publications, rising on their constructal S-curve

Qualified Citations of 'constructal' publications,     rising on their constructal S-curve | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

The updated indices of constructal related works in

qualified peer-review publications. The chart shows the number of citations per year.

 

h-index: 57

(excerpt from Thomson-Reuters® web of science with "constructal" as topic)

Marcelo Errera's insight:

 The accumulated qualified citations since 1996 surpassed the 16,000 barrier. 


 The number of citing Articles without self-citations is approaching the total number of citing articles. Newer researchers in newer fronts as the field takes its natural course of spreading. (updated in February 24, 2018)

An essay over Constructal Theory and Philosophy of Science: 
http://www.acad.ro/sectii2002/proceedings/doc2018-1s/continut/111-116.pdf    

The next CLC conference will be held in Brazil:
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Why does evolution sometimes repeat itself? Spider-eating spiders may hold the answer

Why does evolution sometimes repeat itself? Spider-eating spiders may hold the answer | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

"Discovering something for the second time might sound like a letdown. Not for ecologists in Hawaii, who have found that spider-eating spiders on four islands there independently evolved the same colors: gold, black, and white. This rare example of parallel evolution, which has also been seen in one other Hawaiian spider, could help clarify one of biology’s biggest mysteries: how and when evolution repeats itself. “It’s one of the coolest hidden [examples] of animals evolving new species,” says Robert Fleischer, a conservation genomicist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Washington, D.C., who was not involved with the work."

Marcelo Errera's insight:
One more great paper on that old question. Extraordinary work.

"Why does evolution sometimes repeat itself" definitely is a question that deserves an answer. 

Can chance alone do that ?
Can necessity alone do that ?
Can just both chance and necessity do that ?

What if we look at those traits as atributes of configurations of living systems that to stay alive as such, not as individual exemplar, develop freedom of change, of morphing ? And that they do change as response to environmental conditions and currents (matter, energy, information, etc.) that are imposed to the systems formed by those very traits ? And also that for some reason some configurations become more frequent over time because of some performance criterion ? 

Certainly this is not just chance.
Certainly this is not just necessity.
And certainly not just the combination of both.

There must be, it is fair to assume there is, a deterministic principle working on everything and providing some major trends while accommodating diversity that meets the intrinsic uncontrolled conditions of the environment and the limited means of morphing of each entity.

Those are the reasons Wallace-Darwin postulation of evolution by natural selection is so powerful, even though they had to wisely "abuse" of the inductivism to generalize their findings. It was, still is, inviable to test their theory (recognised as "law") up to indisputable proof.

Came the time we moved on and we look at all instances "traits" and configurations change over time. It happens everywhere and far beyond the so-called "living systems" realm.

The old paradigm was exhausted and it failed to cover these amazing phenomena. The "sometimes" in the original question acknowledges the need for a new paradigm.

"There is a new Law in physics, and that changes everything."

Look it up.


(edited for typos and grammar)
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Information theory and complex life

Information theory and complex life | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
Despite the obvious advantage of simple life forms capable of fast replication, different levels of cognitive complexity have been achieved by living systems in terms of their potential to cope with environmental uncertainty. Against the inevitable cost associated with detecting environmental cues and responding to them in adaptive ways, we conjecture that the potential for predicting the environment can overcome the expenses associated with maintaining costly, complex structures. We present a minimal formal model grounded in information theory and selection, in which successive generations of agents are mapped into transmitters and receivers of a coded message. Our agents are guessing machines and their capacity to deal with environments of different complexity defines the conditions to sustain more complex agents.

Via june holley
Marcelo Errera's insight:
Excellent take on the evolution of organisation (organization) of flow-systems that are under a imposed current of information.

Why does it happen? 

Do living systems exist just to exchange information with the environment ?

#PhysicsOfLife and the #constructal law offer insight in this model. It's #physics.
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How One Quantum Particle Can Send Messages to Itself

How One Quantum Particle Can Send Messages to Itself | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Just another demonstration of the magic of quantum physics. 


Quantum computing promises a future where technology is exponentially faster, more efficient, and more secure. But the mechanics of how it will work are still being figured out. Now, scientists from the University of Vienna and the Australian Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information have demonstrated one possibility for quantum communication that was previously unknown: using one photon can act as both a sender and receiver of information. A paper published this month by Flavio Del Santo, Borivoje Dakić, and Philip Walther in Physical Review Letters, and a follow up demonstration posted on arXiv.org explains how. The technique relies on quantum superposition—the idea that unobserved quantum particles can be in more than one place at once. The researchers demonstrate that if two people, Alice and Bob (the usual names for imaginary subjects of quantum computation experiments), are at a distance from each other, they can use just one photon to communicate. This is how it works: Alice and Bob are in control of a photon which is in a superposition. Either Alice or Bob can manipulate the photon to send a 0 or a 1 to the other. If they both put either a 0 or a 1, Alice gets the photon. If they put in different bits, then Bob gets it. Since Alice knows whether she put in a 0 or 1, she can deduce that Bob input the opposite bit.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
What I believe is close connected to the Constructal Law of Design in Nature is:

"There's no reason why this technique wasn't discovered earlier—scientists just hadn't thought of it yet. "Sometimes you overlook a cool idea, and then it's just literally right in front of your nose,” Walther told Science News. " 

which reminds us that new discoveries and new theories can appear in anytime. Sometimes they just need the right question or mindset.
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Design and Performance Evaluation of Constructal Microchannel Network Heatsinks | Journal of Heat Transfer | ASME DC

Design and Performance Evaluation of Constructal Microchannel Network Heatsinks | Journal of Heat Transfer | ASME DC | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
This work presents the development and analysis of constructal microchannel network architectures for heat dissipation. The network configurations are characterized by multiple flow ramifications and changes in length and hydraulic diameter scales through each ramification level. Architectures investigated experimentally in the past years have adopted constant scaling rules throughout their ramification levels. In this study, constructal theory inspires the design of network architectures with variable scaling rules and up to three ramification levels (N). As a result, it was verified that constructal networks allowed thermal resistance reduction of 15% (N = 2) and 42% (N = 3) for a micro heat sink at a characteristic operational regime. Architecture's selection criterion using performance curves is proposed and it was also demonstrated that the bifurcated network with diameter ratio according to Hess–Murray law is not appropriate for heat dissipation purposes in miniaturised devices.
Marcelo Errera's insight:
A contribution from collaborators of mine and myself. We have revisited tree network for cooling heatsinks.
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2018 NSF Workshop, April 17 -18, 2018: Constructal Theory: 20 Years of Exploration and What the Future Holds

In constructal theory—a mental view of the geometric principle for flow structures—it is thought that “for a finite-size flow system to persist in time (to live), it must evolve in such a way that it provides easier access to the currents that flow through it.” The current can be fluid, mass, energy, heat, money, information, publications, mechanical stress, electrical current, and so forth. Constructal theory has grown into its own field of research with over 5000 textbook, journal, and conference publications in a broad range of areas including engineering and the physical and social sciences. This workshop aims to advance and accelerate constructal theory through the synergistic interaction among theoretical explorations and industrial applications for new frontiers.

Villanova University is a Catholic university founded in 1842 by the Order of Saint Augustine. At Villanova, our educational experience is rooted in a passionate, collaborative pursuit of knowledge and service to others.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
This just in.  A workshop to honor Prof. Bejan and his recently awarded Franklin Institute medal.

19 April dinner & ceremony at Franklin Institute : https://www.fi.edu/awardsdinner
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Without engineering civilization does not exist │Adrian Bejan

"Engineering (...)To have freedom and access to it is Nature itself. From every river to every animal to every one of us, freedom returns the favor and makes the creation of new engineering and with it more freedom possible. 
Without engineering civilization does not exist."

Marcelo Errera's insight:
Great recognition by ASME and a quick reminder that engineering goes beyond of making things work. Alternatively is " the application of science and mathematics by which the properties of matter and the sources of energy in nature are made useful to people" Merrian-Webster.

Why does one (or we) practice engineering ?  What moves us to do it ? Why do we employ creativity ? And furthermore, why rivers do it ? 

Engineering is practiced not only by "intelligent" beings, it is a way nature follows the constructal law.
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NigelReading|ASYNSIS's curator insight, January 12, 12:48 AM
More peer recognition for the "Form follows Flow" perspective, where #Constructal Applied Science meets #Asynsis Useful Art. Congratulations Adrian Bejan!
#AsynsisConstructal
https://asynsis.wordpress.com/2013/10/15/is-there-a-new-geometric-law-of-thermodynamics/

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"Crown shyness" - Tweet from @RobGMacfarlane 

Marcelo Errera's insight:
A theory: the canopy shyness/timidity is a manifestation of the constructal law. It is constructal design. Every canopy, branch and leaf avoids the space of the neighbor because it must have access to fresh air. Note the 'designed spacings' between canopies in the photos. From this physics comes the Fibonacci-number arrangement of branches and leaves, and for the few-large-and-many-small mosaic of tree canopies on the forest map. This is explained in the 2012 book Design in Nature, ch.5, and the references cited in the book.


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Inequality in nature and society / Physics has predicted that already

Inequality in nature and society / Physics has predicted that already | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Inequality is one of the main drivers of social tension. We show striking similarities between patterns of inequality between species abundances in nature and wealth in society. We demonstrate that in the absence of equalizing forces, such large inequality will arise from chance alone. While natural enemies have an equalizing effect in nature, inequality in societies can be suppressed by wealth-equalizing institutions. However, over the past millennium, such institutions have been weakened during periods of societal upscaling. Our analysis suggests that due to the very same mathematical principle that rules natural communities (indeed, a “law of nature”) extreme wealth inequality is inevitable in a globalizing world unless effective wealth-equalizing institutions are installed on a global scale.

 

Inequality in nature and society
Marten Scheffer, Bas van Bavel, Ingrid A. van de Leemput, and Egbert H. van Nes

PNAS


Figure 8 of http://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.4977962?journalCode=jap


Via Complexity Digest
Marcelo Errera's insight:
With a somewhat different approach, this article arrives to similar conclusions Prof. Bejan and I reached in our paper published last March.

We showed (and predicted) that the Lorenz distribution of income is a natural outcome of a flow system that evolves in time towards greater and greater access in the planet landscape: the movement of goods.

Inequality does not happen by evil, nor by chance, but for self-organization of flow systems (energy, mass flow, movement of goods) and the association with energy expenditure and the production of wealth.

Economies are highly complex (in the sense it is hard to describe), however flow organization plays the role of forcing factor.

Innovation and diversification of flow processes in the economies might provide better chances for less disparity.

The links below will direct to out paper In case the authors or PNAS want to cite it.


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Use of Constructal Theory in Modeling in the Geosciences by A. Hunt in a New Book: Fractals: Concepts and Applications in Geosciences

Use of Constructal Theory in Modeling in the Geosciences by A. Hunt in a New Book: Fractals: Concepts and Applications in Geosciences | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it


This book provides theoretical concepts and applications of fractals and multifractals to a broad range of audiences from various scientific communities, such as petroleum, chemical, civil and environmental engineering, atmospheric research, and hydrology. In the first chapter, we introduce fractals and multifractals from physics and math viewpoints. We then discuss theory and practical applications in detail. In what follows, in chapter 2, fragmentation process is modeled using fractals. Fragmentation is the breaking of aggregates into smaller pieces or fragments, a typical phenomenon in nature. In chapter 3, the advantages and disadvantages of two- and three-phase fractal models are discussed in detail. (...) In chapter 13, we discuss constructal theory, which has a perspective opposite to fractal theories, and is based on optimisation of diffusive exchange. In the case of river drainages, for example, the constructal approach begins at the divide and generates headwater streams first, rather than starting from the fundamental drainage pattern.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
A fresh book on Fractals in Geosciences presents a whole chapter on Constructal Law. It is an elegant move from those who are open to question theories even their own. Thanks, Prof. Hunt. We are all looking for answers.
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Design and Performance Evaluation of Constructal Microchannel Network Heatsinks | Journal of Heat Transfer | ASME 

Design and Performance Evaluation of Constructal Microchannel Network Heatsinks | Journal of Heat Transfer | ASME  | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
This work presents the development and analysis of constructal microchannel network architectures for heat dissipation. The network configurations are characterized by multiple flow ramifications and changes in length and hydraulic diameter scales through each ramification level. Architectures investigated experimentally in the past years have constant scaling rules throughout their ramification levels. In this study constructal theory inspires the design of network architectures with variable scaling rules and up to three ramification levels. As result, it was verified that constructal networks allow significant pumping power reduction with respect to networks with same ramification levels. Architecture's selection criteria using performance curves is proposed and it was demonstrated that the bifurcated network with diameter ratio according to Hess-Murray law is not appropriated for heat dissipation purposes in miniaturized devices.
research-article:

Design and Performance Evaluation of Constructal Microchannel Network Heatsinks Alan Lugarini, Admilson T. Franco and Marcelo Risso Errera 
Journal of Heat Transfer ASME // doi:10.1115/1.4038559
Marcelo Errera's insight:
This time a contribution by colleagues and myself on cooling tree-networks. 

Hess-Murray and fractals are not always the best "design". Watch out for biomimicry !

This paper presents a theoretical design that is closer to real applications.  When the design is treated as physics, it is possible to identify when and why some nature inspired designs perform well and when they fall short compared to other designs.

Worth reminding fractals are not applicable directly, only "fractal-like" designs may exist. And such designs will be particular case of constructal design.
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Wealth inequality has been widening for millennia

Wealth inequality has been widening for millennia | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

THE one-percenters are now gobbling up more of the pie in America—that much is well known. This trend, though disconcerting, is not unique to the modern era. A new study, by Timothy Kohler of Washington State University and 17 others, finds that inequality may well have been rising for several thousand years, at least in some parts of the world. The scholars examined 63 archaeological sites and estimated the levels of wealth inequality in the societies whose remains were dug up, by studying the distributions of house sizes.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
That's a very interesting and most very likely laborious study that deserves further discussion.

I would like to take a closer look at the claim of growing  wealth disparity, because overall it seems there are economy entities that may be as "equalitarian" as possible (e.g., Norway).

Full equality only happened when there wasn't any flow of goods. It was the primordial configuration of a design that evolved in time and in many ways.

Worth noting "total equality" and the "perfect heat engine" seem to be both consequences of laws of physics. 

A physics paper (link below) shows that wealth equality (fully), with zero Gini coefficient, is as unattainable as the 100% efficiency of heat engines.

The paper shows that for a sufficiently small and simple economy the distribution of wealth and income is highly associated with the movement of goods. Because movement requires energy expenditure, the "movers" end up self-organising themselves in a hierarchical flow. The ones that move more goods, move them farther and more efficiently thus creating more revenue.

The paper predicted that the "belly" in "Lorenz distribution of income" is inevitable, and that it will never become a straight line (Gini = 0) if wealth and energy are close related.

Even in today's economy such effect may play a major role as forcing factor.

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Power Laws: How Nonlinear Relationships Amplify Results

Power Laws: How Nonlinear Relationships Amplify Results | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
This brief guide on power laws covers what they are and how we can use them to expand our understanding of the world and get better results.

Via Jürgen Kanz, june holley
Marcelo Errera's insight:
Often the power law is just result from data regression or models that already assume organization. It's mathematical modelling, and it's useful because allow predictions. For most of the phenomena we observed it was a major breakthrough. It turns out we are past that. We now have a physics principle that underlies the very origin of most power-law relations and "s-shaped" relations as well. It shows when and why such relations will take place.

The constructal law literature has provided predictions (the physics, explanations) for power-law and S-shaped curves behavior for many phenomena.

The non-linearity in scales that emerges from organization (or complexity) is result of constructal law that predicts "few large and many smalls", "two flow regimes: diffusive (slow) and convective (fast)" and rank. Those designs we observe are in continuous process of evolution: some are in early stages, others are more consolidated. It's the Physics of life.


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Seven implications of complexity for organisations

Seven implications of complexity for organisations | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

My last post was about Paul Cilliers’s 7 characteristics of complex systems.  In this post I want to explore 7 of the implications of complexity that he thought was important for those working in and on organisations (...)


Via june holley, Complexity Digest
Marcelo Errera's insight:
What we see is in the eyes of the beholder or are proper physical quantities?
There are instances in which certain discernible features repeat in Nature. The so called "theory of complex systems" provide a thorough understanding of quantitative characteristics that emerge after organization, but it misses a "natural principle" that explains the "whys". Mostly it establishes variations or corollaries of the Constructal law as axioms. In essence it is sophisticated modelling.
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2018 NSF Workshop: April 17 -18, 2018 Constructal Theory: 20 Years of Exploration and What the Future Holds

2018 NSF Workshop: April 17 -18, 2018 Constructal Theory: 20 Years of Exploration and What the Future Holds | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
April 17 -18, 2018 

Constructal Theory: 20 Years of Exploration and What the Future Holds In constructal theory—a mental view of the geometric principle for flow structures—it is thought that “for a finite-size flow system to persist in time (to live), it must evolve in such a way that it provides easier access to the currents that flow through it.” The current can be fluid, mass, energy, heat, money, information, publications, mechanical stress, electrical current, and so forth. Constructal theory has grown into its own field of research with over 5000 textbook, journal, and conference publications in a broad range of areas including engineering and the physical and social sciences. This workshop aims to advance and accelerate constructal theory through the synergistic interaction among theoretical explorations and industrial applications for new frontiers.

APRIL 18, 2018 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM The Inn at Villanova University 601 County Line Road Wayne, PA 19087 (Where Matsonford & County Line Roads meet)

Marcelo Errera's insight:
Almost a month to the 2018 NSF Workshop:Constructal Theory: 20 Years of Exploration and What the Future Holds.



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Pattern formation—the paradoxical role of turbulence

Pattern formation—the paradoxical role of turbulence | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

The formation of self-organizing molecular patterns in cells is a critical component of many biological processes. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have proposed a new theory to explain how such patterns emerge in complex natural systems.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
There is a difference between patterns and organization or configuration of flow-systems. Patterns may be formed in a ephemeral highly stochastic and non-linear phenomenon. The system reaches equilibrium, no flow takes place anymore, and final result which is imprinted remains unchanged.

In live flow-systems the configuration - which could be mistaken by a pattern - continuously evolves in order to achieve greater access to the currents that flow through the system. 
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Behavior of Thermally Radiating Tree-like Fins | Journal of Heat Transfer | ASME DC

Behavior of Thermally Radiating Tree-like Fins | Journal of Heat Transfer | ASME DC | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
The performance of tree-like fins with varying bifurcation angle, surface emissivity, material, width-to-thickness ratio, and base heat rate was examined. Overall system performance was examined computationally. The computational results have been validated, verified, and cast in terms of commonly defined dimensionless parameters. Tree-like fins were found to be more effective and more efficient than the rectangular fins. Fin efficiency and effectiveness were found to increase with increasing bifurcation angles while base temperatures were found to decrease with increasing bifurcation angles. As expected, base temperatures were highest for the largest width-to-thickness ratios and smallest for materials with relatively higher thermal conductivities.
Marcelo Errera's insight:
An interesting application of Constructal Design with radiation heat transfer.
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Macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic paradox: A Constructal law analysis of atoms as open systems

Macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic paradox: A Constructal law analysis of atoms as open systems | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

The relation between macroscopic irreversibility and microscopic reversibility is a present unsolved problem. Constructal law is introduced to develop analytically the Einstein’s, Schrödinger’s, and Gibbs’ considerations on the interaction between particles and thermal radiation (photons). The result leads to consider the atoms and molecules as open systems in continuous interaction with flows of photons from their surroundings. The consequent result is that, in any atomic transition, the energy related to the microscopic irreversibility is negligible, while when a great number of atoms (of the order of Avogadro’s number) is considered, this energy related to irreversibility becomes so large that its order of magnitude must be taken into account. Consequently, macroscopic irreversibility results related to microscopic irreversibility by flows of photons and amount of atoms involved in the processes.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
This is the first incursion with Constructal Law in the microscopic scale. Prof. Lucia presents an outstanding essay that shows how an atom internal geometry influences the physics at the particles level and leaves the marks for the macroscopic world.
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Freedom Is Good for Design: An Interview with Adrian Bejan | The Freeman - since freedom is always interesting

Freedom Is Good for Design: An Interview with Adrian Bejan | The Freeman - since freedom is always interesting | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Adrian Bejan is a professor of mechanical engineering at Duke University. So why on earth are we talking to him? Bejan is the first person to articulate what could be one of the most important ideas since Darwin’s theory of evolution. He calls it the Constructal Law.

All this may sound highfalutin. But the idea is this: Systems survive when things flow better over time—all kinds of systems. In fact, this is what “life” is: flowing and changing (morphing) freely to flow/move more easily. From natural systems to human systems, when things flow better, we start to notice patterns in nature that are products of good flow. And if Adrian Bejan is right, this is one of the most important—and underappreciated—aspects of our world. Combine the insights of Hayek, the mathematics of Mandelbrot, and the biology of Darwin and you get something that might transform the way you see the world.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
I found this old interview and enjoyed how fresh and timely it still sounds. Some highlights:
(...)
-The Freeman: Some people see comparisons between constructal phenomena and fractals. But fractals are mathematical descriptions, or perhaps abstractions. What’s different about your work, and what makes it the stuff of science?  

-Adrian Bejan: Fractal algorithms are descriptive. One picks the algorithm that leads to a “drawing” that resembles a natural image. (People rarely show you the multitude of algorithms that lead to drawings that look like nothing.) The Constructal Law is predictive: It teaches us how to discover the drawing and how to predict the evolution—the morphing—of the natural design over time. 
Description is empiricism and it is common, that is, diverse and abundant. But prediction involves theory, as well, and it is more rare because it unifies these abundant phenomena. Science needs both: the many small and the few large, the diversity and the unifying pattern. Both are delivered by the Constructal Law.
(...)
-The Freeman: You have said, “Freedom is good for design.” At first blush, this would seem contradictory. Our readers are interested in emergent order. What do you mean by "design," and what are the implications for society? 

- Adrian Bejan: It is not contradictory at all—the opposite (design without freedom) is nonsense, because one cannot have design in nature (live, morphing to flow more easily over time) without freedom to change.
(...)
"
Thank you Foundation for Economic Education.
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Complexity Bias: Why We Prefer Complicated to Simple

Complexity Bias: Why We Prefer Complicated to Simple | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it
Complexity bias is a logical fallacy that leads us to give undue credence to complex concepts. Faced with two competing hypotheses, we are likely to choose the most complex one.
Marcelo Errera's insight:
Good point. The mistake is to presume "complexity" is a first principle; that it is the departing point of a phenomenon.

The article also reminds us the common understanding of complexity as " “the state of having many parts and being difficult to understand or find an answer to.” The definition of simplicity is the inverse: “something [that] is easy to understand or do.” Chaos is defined as “a state of total confusion with no order.” "

Arguably complexity may be replaced by organization, as an outcome of natural principles.  We addressed that in our essay 


when we showed that regardless of the kind of systems (bio or non-bio) it's possible to devise a theory based on Constructal Law of design in nature.

Design as discernible features of a system evolves in time in "live" systems.

The mathematical treatment that has been developed in the last twenty-years became a powerful tool to model, quantify and identify emerging properties. Nevertheless, it does not provide explanations.
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Constructal law, the new page

Constructal law, the new page | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

"Constructal law is a theory in physics concerning the evolution of design (configurations, patterns, geometry) in nature. Natural design evolution and the constructal law unite all animate and inanimate systems [1][2]. In order to have evolution, the system must have freedom to morph. The constructal law was stated by Adrian Bejan in 1996 as follows: “For a finite-size system to persist in time (to live), it must evolve in such a way that it provides easier access to the imposed currents that flow through it.”[3][4][5]. “Constructal law” was coined by Bejan to describe the natural tendency of flow systems (e.g. rivers, trees and branches [6], and engineered forms[7]) to generate and evolve structures that increase flow access [3][8].

Marcelo Errera's insight:
Last scoop of the year is the new page on Constuctal law. See you all in 2018.
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A general scaling law reveals why the largest animals are not the fastest

A general scaling law reveals why the largest animals are not the fastest | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Speed is the fundamental constraint on animal movement, yet there is no general consensus on the determinants of maximum speed itself. Here, we provide a general scaling model of maximum speed with body mass, which holds across locomotion modes, ecosystem types and taxonomic groups. In contrast to traditional power-law scaling, we predict a hump-shaped relationship resulting from a finite acceleration time for animals, which explains why the largest animals are not the fastest. This model is strongly supported by extensive empirical data (474 species, with body masses ranging from 30 μg to 100 tonnes) from terrestrial as well as aquatic ecosystems. Our approach unravels a fundamental constraint on the upper limit of animal movement, thus enabling a better understanding of realized movement patterns in nature and their multifold ecological consequences.

Marcelo Errera's insight:
* Maximum speed is different than the average speed. *
This new paper published in Nature solves an interesting question of the relation of maximum speed and body mass of animals.
It goes beyond data regression. It brings some rationale behind the observed data.
It also acknowledges the predictions by constructal law [ref. 10] for the correlation with the body mass. That earlier publication predicted theoretically the overall average speed is related to body mass. Predictions matched the data.

In addition both studies predicted speed and body mass follow the same trends for either terrestrial, aquatic and aerial animals. 

While a theory based on CL predicted the average speed, this new work predicted the maximum speed. They are two different things. This new study predicted the maximum speed has a 'hump" at the high end of the curve.

If I may, I found to be important that a prestigious periodical appreciates the importance of scaling laws in biology. Furthermore if the scaling law is predicted base on some theory.


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The Constructal Law - Science Ambassador Scholarship 2018

Hello, I'm Megan and I love physics! Last summer I picked up a book on design in nature and discovered how cool the constructal law is. In this video, I g
Marcelo Errera's insight:
This quick video on Constructal Law showed that open minds learn fast. Science is a free and open world. Thanks Megan and The Science Ambassador Scholarship. http://www.scienceambassadorscholarship.org
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The fundamental advantages of temporal networks

The fundamental advantages of temporal networks | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Historically, network science focused on static networks, in which nodes are connected by permanent links. However, in networked systems ranging from protein-protein interactions to social networks, links change. Although it might seem that permanent links would make it easier to control a system, Li et al. demonstrate that temporality has advantages in real and simulated networks. Temporal networks can be controlled more efficiently and require less energy than their static counterparts.

 

The fundamental advantages of temporal networks
A. Li, S. P. Cornelius, Y.-Y. Liu, L. Wang, A.-L. Barabási
Science  24 Nov 2017:
Vol. 358, Issue 6366, pp. 1042-1046
DOI: 10.1126/science.aai7488


Via Complexity Digest
Marcelo Errera's insight:
One more interesting article on the evolution of networks. Networks, or anything, can only evolve in time only if there is degree of freedom. Live networks will never stay static in time. If it's static, it must be dead in the design evolution sense.
It's a law of physics.
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Entropy: Why Life Always Seems to Get More Complicated

Entropy: Why Life Always Seems to Get More Complicated | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Entropy is one of the fundamental forces of our universe. And the Second Law of Thermodynamics states that it will never decrease. Read this to learn more.


“The law that entropy always increases holds, I think, the supreme position among the laws of Nature.” —Arthur Eddington


Warning !!

Marcelo Errera's insight:
I enjoyed reading James Clear's piece. But I feel in the obligation to warn about some issues.

There are all sorts of confusion one may arrive with the concepts of entropy, complexity, chaos, order, information and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

Any thermodynamics student knows it is possible to find instances in which entropy decreases (look it up !).

Arthur Eddington referred to entropy increase for the entire universe as an isolated system, not for any system. Only in isolated systems the entropy cannot decrease. 

If I may, I agree with Eddington on the power of the Second Law of Thermodynamics as one of the pillars of Physics. By symmetry, though, I shall say a law that leads to order (design, organization, configuration, etc.) must be in equal regard. 

Why life itself is plenty of order, configuration and organization? Why they also happen in the "abiotic" world? Isn't all just going to chaos and disorder ? Isn't that the direction of time? 

"Science holds that the arrow of time in nature is imprinted on one-way (irreversible) phenomena, and is accounted for by the second law of thermodynamics. (...)  the arrow of time is painted much more visibly on another self-standing phenomenon: the occurrence and change (evolution in time) of flow organization throughout nature, animate and inanimate."


We also wrote about it in: 

corrected for: isolated systems.
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Welcome to the Constructal Community

Welcome to the Constructal Community | Constructal Law of Design in Nature | Scoop.it

Going with the flow


Welcome to the Constructal Community I created this website as a way to gather information about the Constructal Law and the way it shapes our understanding of life and evolution. I’m not a scientist who understands thermodynamics, but rather a poet looking for the underlying architecture of the “oneness” we all feel in nature. I was introduced to Design in Nature by my dog trainer, Kevin Behan. Since then, I have been fascinated by the way Professor Bejan is able to link every aspect of life (biology, economics, technology, etc.) through a single law of physics.


Another fascination of mine is animal movement as it relates to behavior, and the way that moving well (feeling flow) creates healing in both humans and dogs. And so this quote from Design in Nature is especially meaningful to me:


 “Life is movement and the constant morphing of the design of this movement. To be alive is to keep on flowing and morphing. When a system stops flowing and morphing, it is dead.”

Marcelo Errera's insight:
A new channel to facilitate the flow is available by the Constructal Community.
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