Congregational Vitality
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5 Ways to Help Young Leaders Succeed

In some diocese we have effective deaneries and clergy circles. For the sake of our denomination our congregations, the staff, clergy and members I pray we reconstitute "parishes". We should be selecting and training clergy who have the wisdom, skills and commitment to foster co-creation of ministry for the population in the immediate cultural circle, and make disciples who make disciples who build up the body (Eph 4:11,12). #payitforward #sustainabledevelopment

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Employees and Teams Who Succeed. A Neurologist’s View

Employees and Teams Who Succeed. A Neurologist’s View | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, by Patrick Lencioni. Drawing sourced via Bob Marshall.

 

It's fascinating how neuroscience is measuring and providing evidence for some long standing philosophical principals.

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Liebig's barrel and the law of minimum

Liebig's barrel and the law of minimum | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it

Liebig's barrel provides a model to build organizational capacity in churches. The key elements are the yearnings of the soul: worship, community, discipleship, stewardship and outreach.

 

Follow me on G+ (http://gplus.to/gtroxell) to participate in a #hangout or contact me if you would like to explore other ministry training options.  

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7 Barriers To Having High Performing Employees

Employees can really make the difference to the results that are achieved.  At the same time leaders and managers often do things that get in the way. 

 

In the church we have not only employees but also members who are called to live out their vocation (Eph 4:11,12) using their God-given gifts, strengths and personality. 

 

These barriers apply to both, members and employees. Avoiding these pitfalls will help you cultivate congregational vitality. 

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Three Levels of Trust – Where Do Your Relationships Stand?

Three Levels of Trust – Where Do Your Relationships Stand? | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it
When it comes to trust, not all relationships are at the same level. Based on the context of the given relationship – professional, personal, family, social – each one can experience a different level of trust.

 

When it comes to trust, not all relationships are at the same level. Based on the context of the given relationship – professional, personal, family, social – each one can experience a different level of trust.

 

There are three basic levels of trust. The first level is deterence-based trust, or what I like to call “rules-based” trust. This is the most fundamental, base level of trust in all relationships. Deterence-based trust means that there are rules in place that prevent one person from taking advantage of, or harming another person. In society we have laws that govern our behavior in personal and business settings. When we engage in business we have contracts that ensure one party can trust another to hold up their end of the bargain. In organizations we have policies and procedures that provide boundaries for how we interact and treat each other, and if we violate those rules, usually there are consequences involved.


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The Greatest Obstacles to My Faith

The Greatest Obstacles to My Faith | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it

We underrate faith. It is the key that will unlock divine wisdom and spare us from narcissistic view and futile activities. 

  

Hebrews 7:19 reminds us of the important of FAITH, "For the law never made anything perfect. But now we have confidence in a better hope, through which we draw near to God."

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Know thyself and thy team

Know thyself and thy team | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it

I've served over 20 years in minsitry and found no tool better than PDP® to help you understand your personal strengths and those of your team. The leading cause of team failure is caused by lack of authenticity. It undermines and trust, collaboration, endurance and efficacy.   

 

Contact me to get your ProScan® report. See your strengths and build up your team and the church. 

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28 Vision-based Competencies for Church Staff and Leader Development – Will Mancini

28 Vision-based Competencies for Church Staff and Leader Development – Will Mancini | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it
How are you helping your best leaders grow in the area of applying strategy and visionary thinking? What about every person on staff? What about the elders...
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9 things successful people do differently

9 things successful people do differently | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it

If you aren’t sure, you are far from alone in your confusion. It turns out that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are pretty lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail. The intuitive answer — that you are born predisposed to certain talents and lacking in others — is really just one small piece of the puzzle.

 

In fact, decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are, but more often because of what they do.


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5 Ways to Lead with Emotional Intelligence -- and Boost Productivity

5 Ways to Lead with Emotional Intelligence -- and Boost Productivity | Congregational Vitality | Scoop.it

More emotional intelligence, is what our world strongly need. This excellent post say all what you need to know about this subject. [note Martin Gysler]

 

Employees today are much more aware of whether or not they are a good fit in their workplace culture and they want their leaders to be more mindful of their needs. In general, employees have become more sensitive about how to best co-exist in a workplace environment that allows them to be who they naturally are.

 

Employees are tired of playing games and just want to be themselves. As such, they are managing their careers and looking to advance by searching for jobs that truly fuel their passion, fulfill their desires, and ignite their real talent. For most, today’s economic landscape has made the career management journey extra challenging. And beyond career advancement opportunities, people want their supervisors and leaders to be more in touch with who they are as people (not just as their colleagues) to assure that their career track is in proper alignment with and supports their personal and professional goals.

 

Read more: http://onforb.es/S5CSgI


Via Martin Gysler, donhornsby
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