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Is online privacy a right? | Salon.com

Is online privacy a right? | Salon.com | Computer Topics | Scoop.it

Keep Calm, and Encrypt — this slogan, a play off Britain’s World War II posters, is the privacy-seeker’s new motto in the age of mass surveillance and data mining. The idea is that even with the expansion of surveillance, some data can still be kept away from eavesdroppers, as long as it is properly encrypted. It is the assumption behind whistleblower Edward Snowden’s insistence on only communicating via encrypted conduits and it is the basis for watchdog groups like the Freedom of the Press Foundation to help reporters learn how to communicate through such conduits with their sources.

 

Using encryption is clearly a smart move in this Orwellian era. After all, even with the NSA’s impressive codebreaking abilities, secure encryption still works. In fact, when done properly, it works so well to preserve privacy and lock data away from snoops that the government has now kicked off an aggressive campaign to turn the concept of “secure encryption” into an oxymoron.

 

Specifically, the Obama administration has launched an initiative to force tech companies to give the NSA a set of Internet-wide skeleton keys. The radical move, which would let law enforcement agencies access vast troves of encrypted information, adds significant questions to the ongoing debate over privacy. It begs us to ask not only whether the government has a right to vacuum up millions of Americans’ private data, but also to ask whether the security-conscious among us should even be allowed to retain the right to make data truly secure?

 

The word “right” is important here — the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution does not only bar unreasonable searches and seizures nor does it only mandate probable cause for searches. In addition to all that, it enshrines “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects.” In the digital age, it shouldn’t be a stretch to assume that such a precept means a basic right to access tools that keep personal property, including data and intellectual property, secure.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The Information Omnivore Blog: Contact

I've put together a short, easy tutorial on email encryption at http://t.co/tOR35GY1pM. "Dummy" tested it today. It should all work. :)
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Yahoo buys browser RockMelt to bolster mobile, networking - Economic Times

Yahoo buys browser RockMelt to bolster mobile, networking - Economic Times | Computer Topics | Scoop.it
Economic Times Yahoo buys browser RockMelt to bolster mobile, networking Economic Times RockMelt's Web browser, which was launched in 2010, integrated social networking features directly within the browser, allowing users to send Facebook messages...
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5 free Linux text editors for programming and word processing

5 free Linux text editors for programming and word processing | Computer Topics | Scoop.it
When you're a programmer who also needs word processing abilities, nothing beats a solid text editor. We look at the current versions of five of the best known.
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Malicious SpyPhone Software Can Disguise Itself As A Legit App To Take Control Over Your Android Device

Malicious SpyPhone Software Can Disguise Itself As A Legit App To Take Control Over Your Android Device | Computer Topics | Scoop.it
While Android continues to go from strength to strength in offering consumers a better all-round user experience, there are still some noteworthy trade-offs when comparing with the likes of iOS.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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