Computer Science - Aspect 2
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High Schools Not Meeting STEM Demand

High Schools Not Meeting STEM Demand | Computer Science - Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Only 5 percent of U.S. high schools offered the AP test in computer science last year.
Steve Fulton's insight:

Some of the biggest names in the world today are all computer scientists, Bill Gates(Microsoft), Steve Jobs(Apple), Mark Zukerburg(Facebook).  Each of these life changing and very successful people all learned computer science before highschool graduation.  In order for the students to able to take these courses the schools need to hire teachers able to teach the courses.  Most districts have a limited budget and computer science doesnt take priority.  People need to rethink they way we hire teachers "with this changing labor market."

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Instant Index: Google Debuts the Talking Shoe

Instant Index: Google Debuts the Talking Shoe | Computer Science - Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
  The Talking  Shoe Experiment Credit: Joanna Stern/ABC News First it was computerized glasses, now Google is showing off a “talking shoe” at SXSW, designed to get people moving. The computerized sneakers have a bit of an attitude.
Steve Fulton's insight:

Google recently revealed a new project, "the talking shoe."  This shoe basically trash talks you depending on how much activity you do.  If your not moving for a period of time it might say something like, "If standing still was a national sport you'd be world champion."  These shoes will also tell you how your workout was and post it onto your smartphone.  The more you use the shoes the more information it will collect of you and end up developing a personality.

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Teach U.S. kids to write computer code

Teach U.S. kids to write computer code | Computer Science - Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Douglas Rushkoff says digital literacy is not a priority in our schools, impeding kids' understanding of the digital world and crippling U.S. competitiveness.
Steve Fulton's insight:

1.)  When language in general came into existence people didn't just learn how to listen, they also learned how to speak it.  When we were given text in school we were taught how to read and write it.  Now, with computers, people know how to use them but nothing more.  Computer classes shouldn't be about learning how to use software but how to make software, new and innovative software.

 

2.)  Not providing the oppurtunity to kids how to program is hurting America's competiveness in business.  We outsource programming jobs because there aren't american programmers, not because we can't afford american programmers.  Computer Science teaches kids how to critically think, not just digitally but about the world.

 

3.)  "Programming is not like being the mechanic of an automobile."  We are comparing the driver to the passenger not the driver and the mechanic.  As the passanger you rely on the driver to take you everywhere and even let you know if a place exists or not.  If you do not know how to program a computer you will always be the passanger not allowing yourself to take the wheel and take yourself wherever your heart desires.

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What most schools don't teach

Learn about a new "superpower" that isn't being taught in most schools
Steve Fulton's insight:

1.)  We live in a computer run society where we would all would be lost without it.  So why aren't kids being taught how computers run "under the hood?"  Programming teaches kids how to problem solve which is essential.  Steve Jobs once said, “I think everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer because it teaches you how to think.”

 

2.)  Not only does programming exercise your brain but there are plenty of jobs available, high paying ones.  They are also have a reputation for having great work conditions.  There is such a high demand for these jobs but kids just don't realize it.  There just simply isn't enough graduates to fulfill these great, life-changing jobs.

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Who needs Google Glass, Google just introduced talking... shoes. Seriously. | Reviews, news, tips, and tricks | dotTech

Who needs Google Glass, Google just introduced talking... shoes. Seriously. | Reviews, news, tips, and tricks | dotTech | Computer Science - Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
At its SXSW Interactive headquarters, Google just introduced a talking shoe which provides snarky comments based on your leg movements. And it isn't a
Steve Fulton's insight:

Google's new talking shoe is part of a project called "Art, Copy, Code" which basically takes everyday object and make them feel life-like and social.  They hope to take something like an alarm clock or a watch and just make them feel life-like so you are never alone.  These shoes won't be out for some time but this is a just a small taste of the future.

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Interview

Senior Research Project

Steve Fulton's insight:

Hi Steve.  Good to hear from you.  Here are some thoughts in reply to your questions:

 

Note that I think you are using “computer science” to mean “programming and computer science” (these are not the same thing, but they are indeed related).  I’ll proceed under that assumption.

 

1.) When, in your opinion, did computer science start to get recoginzed and revolutionize the way we live today?

 

It’s first serious impact was back in World War II.  Computer scientists (though they were not called that at the time) broke the German and Japanese codes, which saved countless lives.  However, they didn’t have broad recognition before the 1980’s.  Even then, their impact, huge as it was, was largely on business practices.  It wasn’t until the 1990’s that the average consumer started interacting frequently with technology of the sort created by computer scientists.  And now there’s hardly any aspect of human endeavor that is not infiltrated by computer science.

 

2.) Why would you recommend computer science to a high school student?

 

I’ve been doing it for nearly 30 years, and I still love it.   It has all the rich, textured complexity of other sciences, and all the fun and challenging problem-solving of mathematics, all the building of real things of engineering, and all the beauty and aesthetics of the arts.  What’s not to love?  Oh, and you get to work for the best companies on the most exciting products, earning a lot of money in a stable, respectable, upwardly-mobile job.  What’s not to love?

 

3.) What would an employer look for in a computer scientist?

 

Beyond smarts, dedication, and dependability -- more than anything, creative problem-solving.  But also a great team player, since most real problems these days require teams to solve.

 

4.) How important, in your opinion, is the role of computer science, in terms of the way we live today?

 

Computers control the global financial system.  The global power system.  The global transportation system.  The global manufacturing and distribution systems.  And of course the global information system (the web).  They are the predominant means of communication and increasingly of socialization.  And this is just the beginning!

 

5.) Do you see any huge leap forwards in technology in the next few years?  If so what?

 

Indeed.  While computers will increasingly touch our lives everywhere, look for amazing advances in medicine, based on computational models, improved imaging, DNA sequencing, and the like.  For example, I expect some types of cancers to be basically cured in that time span, with computers playing a central role.

 

6.) Is there any job growth in computer science? If so, what jobs specifically?

 

Dramatic growth across all areas of computer science.  Study after study predicts that computer science will enjoy the largest growth of any professional field in the next 5, 10, and 20 years.  Despite the amazing advances in computing in the past 30 years, there is still so much right around the corner!

 

7.) What educational advice would you give a high school student planning to major in computer science?

 

Don’t stress.  There are not too many opportunities for you to pursue serious computer science before college (people are trying hard to fix this, but alas, they won’t have this fixed before you graduate high school).   So just find ways to get some exposure, if you can, and HAVE FUN.  Just enjoy the experience.  Maybe learn to write a web app, or an arcade game, or a physics simulation.  Whatever floats your boat.  But keep it FUN.  That’s my $0.02.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Carpe diem.


David

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Steve Fulton's comment, March 13, 2013 1:50 PM
David Kosbie, cmu professor, koz@cmu.edu
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What’s wrong with this picture?

What’s wrong with this picture? | Computer Science - Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
The difference between the opportunity vs. today's reality is astounding.
Steve Fulton's insight:

1.)  Students now a days worry about if they'll get a job out of college.  That's because there isn't must opportunity in the field they go into.  Computer Science on the other hand as of right now has 400,000 jobs available each year and only 150,000 students.  By year 2020 it is predicted that there will be 1,000,000 million more jobs than students who graduated with some sort of computer science degree.

 

2.)  Computer Science is a very well paid job, in fact its "one of the highest paid college degrees" and the jobs available in this degree are growing by "2x the national average."  Most people would agree with me that computer science and technology in general is much more relevant than it was 10 years ago.  If that's true, which it is, then why are only 2.4% of college students majoring in a computer science field which is less than it was 10 years ago?

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Teacher's Comments

Senior Research Project

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 11:40 PM
Good job synthesizing info and putting it into your own words!
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 11:40 PM
Great job obtaining interview results!
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 11:40 PM
30/30