computer mediated communication
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connecting language learners using web tools, virtual exchange.
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Open Badge Passport

Open Badge Passport | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
One of a suite of badges for Erasmus Plus virtual exchange awarded for successful participation in Advanced + training....
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#LTHEchat 116: Beyond advocacy for change – developing critical & open approaches in Learning Technology - Wakelet

#LTHEchat 116: Beyond advocacy for change – developing critical & open approaches in Learning Technology - Wakelet | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
With Maren Deepwell @marendeepwell and Martin Hawksey @mhawksey...
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EuroCALL 2018 - Future-proof CALL: Language learning as exploration and encounters — University of Jyväskylä

EuroCALL 2018 - Future-proof CALL: Language learning as exploration and encounters — University of Jyväskylä | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
EuroCALL 2018 - Future-proof CALL: Language learning as exploration and encounters...
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Cover : In This Together: Teachers' Experiences with Transnational, Telecollaborative Language Learning Projects

Cover : In This Together: Teachers' Experiences with Transnational, Telecollaborative Language Learning Projects | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
In This Together Teachers' Experiences with Transnational, Telecollaborative Language Learning Projects Series: Edited By Melinda Ann Dooly Owenby and Robert O'Dowd Book (EPUB) ISBN:978-3-0343-3534-8 DOI:https://doi.org/10.3726/b14311 Availability:Available Subjects:Education Formats:EPUBPDFPaperback Redeem Token Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2018. 232 pp., 34 fig. col., 4 fig. b/w, 20 tables, 28 graphs
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Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange for Universities – UNICollaboration

“One can even say that online intercultural exchange combines the best of internationalization at home and abroad and certainly in a blended learning form that contributes to the realization of global citizenship for all students and academic staff” (Hans de Wit, 2015). Transnational Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange Projects (TEPs) are curriculum-based Virtual Exchanges jointly developed by two or more educators  located in different countries with the training and support of UNICollaboration. TEPs can be developed around the development of skills (e.g. photography, citizen journalism, foreign languages), contemporary issues (e.g. the environment, activism, migration) or subject-specific curricula (e.g. artificial intelligence, child development, immigration law) to view the course content from different perspectives adding an international and intercultural dimension. TEPs are designed to engage young people in sustained interaction with peers across the Mediterranean and to foster the development of participants’ language and communication skills, digital literacies, team-working and problem-solving skills in addition to enriching their understanding of course content. Type of partners sought University educators from any discipline interested in developing TEPs on specific themes. Generally TEPs, especially the first time they are implemented, do not involve the creation of a new course but involve adapting existing course curricula together with partners and UNICollaboration tutors. Partners must work in an EU country and/or the Southern Mediterranean region as defined in the European Neighbourhood Policy: Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Syria, Tunisia. Click here to see an overview of the training programs offered in the next few months. Click on one of the links below to find out more about our specific programs. Are you new to Virtual Exchange and want a brief course to learn more about it and specifically TEPs? Take the Basic Training Are you teaching a course in the autumn semester 2018 and would you like to embed a Virtual Exchange into it? Take the Collaborative TEP Design Are you an experienced VE practitioner looking to adapt your current exchange to the Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange requirements? Take the Advanced+ Training Are you a university staff member (e.g. international office, technical support, inclusion services, etc.) and would like to know more about how to promote Virtual Exchange at your institution? Click here to see our suggestions.   Click here to download a .pdf with information on all the trainings currently being offered. Pages: 1 2 3 4 5
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Krakow 2018 Long Tail - Google Slides

Krakow 2018 Long Tail - Google Slides | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
A Telecollaboration Model for Reaching the Long Tail of Languages Thor Sawin & Gabriel Guillén April 25 Kraków, Polska UNICollaboration 2018...
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Stop the link tax

Stop the link tax | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
The EU Commission is once again trying to impose a new link tax. They need to hear your voice before they create this dangerous law.
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a real threat to how we use the web, please engage with this and #resist
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Finding a Language Partner on the Other Side of the World

Finding a Language Partner on the Other Side of the World | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
Photo credit: “Skype Friend” by flickr user Greg Balzer From the editor: Though teachers are our main audience, we realize many people use our materials to learn languages independently. For our readers who are dedicated independent language learners, guest blogger Chi Fang shares his experience learning with a native speaker language partner, and gives advice on how to find a language partner of your own. When I decided to learn Spanish, I got started in seconds by downloading Duolingo on my phone, and found plenty of free grammar exercises and audio courses online. I learned the basic grammar rules and memorized several hundred words of vocabulary. But I still didn’t know how to SPEAK Spanish. Most people want to learn a language so that they can speak it, but the majority of language courses and apps can’t prepare us for the real thing. This is something that I struggled with. All the concepts I studied seemed to go out the window when I was faced with a real-life situation where I had to listen to what someone was saying, think of a response and form sentences, all in a matter of seconds. I realized that the only way to get better at this was by having more conversations, which meant finding someone to practice with for one or two hours per week. I found someone online, and since then I’ve learned a lot about choosing the right language partner. Your language partner should be a native speaker of the language that you are trying to learn. He/she will help you practice their language and in exchange, you will help them improve their English. For example, my Guatemalan partner and I used to have one hour Skype conversations, where we would speak in Spanish for 30 minutes, and then switch to English for 30 minutes. Please note that your partner is not a professional teacher. They can correct your mistakes, but they may not be able to explain the theory behind what you did wrong. Most native speakers don’t know the exact grammar rules of their own language, they just know what sounds “right.” There are several free online language exchanges that will connect you to language partners from around the world. You can browse through their profiles and send them a message to set up a video call. Here are some things to think about when selecting a language partner: Priorities: How serious is the person about improving their language skills? Commitment: Are they willing to set aside time every week? Does their schedule line up with yours? Proficiency: Is their English level close to your proficiency in their language? Otherwise, it can be intimidating to speak with someone who is more advanced. Patience: Is your partner willing to help you as much as you are willing to help them? You and your partner should set the rules from the very beginning: How long should the session be? Will you strictly speak in your target language or is it okay to revert to English once in a while? How often do you want to be corrected? Which topics would you like to talk about? Which topics are off-limits? For example, I told my partner that I wanted them to mercilessly correct me for every mistake I make. However, this approach isn’t for everyone. It is also important to maintain a 50/50 balance between languages to ensure that you are both benefiting equally from the exchange. Don’t be afraid to use a timer to enforce this balance. Lastly, you need to manage your own expectations. Not all conversations will go smoothly, and finding the right language partner for you will involve some degree of trial and error. But when you do find that perfect person, it can make a world of difference in your language learning journey. — Chi Fang is an entrepreneur and blogger. He speaks English, Spanish, Mandarin, and Polish, and he frequently travels the world to study languages and culture. Chi is the founder of the online language learning company Verbalicity, and is currently based in Canada.
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a student perspective on CMC
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Journal of Virtual Exchange

Journal of Virtual Exchange
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open journal goes live! #unicollab2018 
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Virtual Exchange: collaborative language-learning, from computer screen to real life! –

Virtual Exchange: collaborative language-learning, from computer screen to real life! – | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
By Teresa MacKinnon (@warwicklanguage), Principal Teaching Fellow (e-learning) The first week of March was the coldest week in the UK for some time. However, a warm welcome awaited SMLC visitors from Krakow, Poland who were far more used to coping with a little snow than we are.
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great memories of Marcin's visit, and now off to Krakow for #unicollab2018
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European Commission - PRESS RELEASES - Press release - Erasmus+ goes virtual

European Commission - Press Release details page - European Commission - Press release Brussels, 15 March 2018 Erasmus+, one of the EU's iconic and most successful programmes, today adds an online version to its mobility actions, to link more students and young people from European countries and the Southern neighbourhood of the EU. The European Commission has today
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proud to be part of the delivery team for this groundbreaking initiative.
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(2) Twitter | Open Educational Practice

(2) Twitter | Open Educational Practice | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
This Pin was discovered by Teresa MacKinnon. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.
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Webinar: Open licensing in the Erasmus+ CBHE projects – OpenMed

Webinar: Open licensing in the Erasmus+ CBHE projects – OpenMed | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
(webpage updated on 26 July 2018) Title Open licensing in the Erasmus+ CBHE projects Date 24 July 2018 at h17.45 CEST Transcript Transcript of the webinar Recorded Webinar Slides Abstract The Erasmus+ programme promotes the open access to materials, documents and media that are useful for learning, teaching, training, youth work and are produced by projects funded by the programme. It is indeed a requirement for any funded project to make project outputs available for the public in digital form, freely accessible through the Internet under open licences. Dr. Cable Green, Director of Open Education at Creative Commons, will provide an overview of open licensing and OER which can be applied to CBHE projects, and practical examples on how to deal with the Erasmus+ Open Access requirement, in terms of how to use Creative Commons licenses, an overview of the 6 type of CC licenses, and which types of license are suitable for OER to ensure that publicly funded materials provide value to the general public and to ensure long-term access to the results. Speaker Dr. Cable Green, Director of Open Education, Creative Commons Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, open content, and open policies to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain their education goals. He’s a leading advocate for open licensing policies that ensure publicly funded education materials are freely and openly available. Cable helps lead the global open education movement and is the Director of Open Education at Creative Commons (CC) – a nonprofit organization at the center of an international movement to promote sharing of creativity and knowledge. CC provides the well-known suite of open licenses that have become the global standard used by governments, institutions and individuals across culture, education, and science, to promote sharing, collaboration and innovation. The CC licenses are everywhere—1.3+ billion are in use across 9 million websites—making it easy for anyone to freely access and use open educational resources. Cable has 20+ years of academic technology, online learning, and open education experience and helped establish the Open Course Library. Cable holds a PhD in educational psychology from Ohio State University, and enjoys motorcycling and playing in the mountains with his family. He lives in Olympia, Washington, USA with his wife and two boys. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cablegreen Twitter: @cgreen Who is the webinar for Erasmus+ CBHE projects coordinators and partners in the South-Mediterranean, and anyone interested in the open licensing of educational materials produced with public funds, of any nationality.
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Webinar for Ufuk - Google Docs

Webinar for Ufuk - Google Docs | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
Designing Open Educational Resources (OER) based materials Teresa MacKinnon. Reading materials: https://opencontenttoolkit.wikispaces.com/Language+teaching http://langoer.eun.org/ Overview: A broadcast and recorded webinar to ELT students working on task design for language learning to e...
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Presentations and Templates by Teresa MacKinnon

Presentations and Templates by Teresa MacKinnon | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
Presentations That Inspire. Meet Haiku Deck, a completely new kind of presentation software. We make telling your story simple, beautiful, and fun. Get Started.
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Moodle plugins directory: RecordRTC for Atto

Moodle plugins directory: RecordRTC for Atto | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
Features Add audio and video annotations to text, anywhere an Atto text editor is present. This plugin adds buttons for recording audio or video (with audio) to the editor's toolbar.  Using WebRTC technologies, all recording is done instantly in the browser. After recording, users can embed the annotation directly into the text they are currently editing. The recording will appear as an audio or video player in the published writing. Installation There are several ways to install the plugin/ We describe here the easiest and more reliable one which is through Moodle plugin directory. Two more methods are described in the wiki page installation section. Logged in as administrator into your Moodle server, go to [Site administration -> Plugins -> Install plugins] Click on [Install plugins from the Moodle plugins directory] Search for RecordRTC and choose the one you are looking for. There is an atto_recordrtc and a tinymce_recordrtc plugin. Click on [Install now] and look up for your Moodle site in the list. Click on [Install now] and follow the steps. After the installation starts, just follow the steps. The plugin will work with the defaults, but you may want to go back and change them depending of your requirements. Details about the configuration can also be found in the wiki page configuration section. Usage  To use the plugin, just click on one of the recording buttons (either the microphone or the video camera), and a popup will appear with a big "Start Recording" button. When clicked, the browser will probably ask for permission to use the webcam/microphone. After the recording starts, a timer will begin counting down, indicating how much time is left to record; when the timer hits 0, the recording will automatically stop (this will also happen if approaching the maximum upload size determined in the server settings). When the recording is finished, the user can play it back to see/hear if it is what they want. To embed the file, the user must click "Attach Recording as Annotation". A dialog box will pop up asking the user what the link should appear as in the text editor. After that, the file gets embedded right where the cursor was in the text. Configuration The plugin can be configured during the initial install, and later by navigating to Site administration > Plugins > Text editors > Atto HTML editor > RecordRTC. The administrator can: Allow the users to record only audio, only video, or both (changing the buttons that appear in the editor toolbar) Change the target bitrate of recorded audio Change the target bitrate of recorded video Set the recording time limit, to control maximum recording size Troubleshooting, Known Issues and F.A.Q More extensive documentation can be found in the wiki page
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Training – UNICollaboration

Training – UNICollaboration | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
The UNICollaboration training team is charged with organising telecollaborative training events, workshops for educators new to the field, online training etc. Training workshops are organised on request of institutions or individuals who are members of the UNICollaboration organisation. Is your institution o   considering running virtual exchanges? o   looking for experts who can train educators to set up virtual exchanges and integrate them into academic curricula? o   willing to support educators already engaged in virtual exchanges with expert training? o   interested in helping the faculty research virtual exchanges? If so, we offer various training formats:  o    half-day workshops (ideally linked to a conference or seminar); o    full-day workshops (stand alone or also linked to a conference or seminar; can be fully customized and extended to   1.5 or 2 days upon request); o    F2F training at your venue proceeded with a pre/post-training online component The content of the training will be adjusted to your needs and may include: virtual exchanges for beginners and advanced educators; virtual exchanges for languages or other subject areas; becoming technology savvy for telecollaboration; digital literacies skills development; managing conflict; task design (developing telecollaboration scenarios); assessing virtual exchanges; researching virtual exchanges. Download and share our information flyer Our previous training events:  IALIC Conference, Barcelona, 25th November 2016  ICCAGE Conference, Prague, 22nd June 2017 Upcoming events: Third Telecollaboration Conference, Cracow, 25-27 April 2018 The UNICollaboration training officers are: Mirjam Hauck, First training officer, Open University UK Malgorzata (Gosia) Kurek, Second training officer, Jan Dlugosz University, Częstochowa, Poland More info: training@unicollaboration.org.
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touches of sense...: Missing links...

touches of sense...: Missing links... | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
It's difficult to see from this photo. You'll have to take my word for it. I was attending a conference, the Unicollaboration conferen...
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#virtuallyconnecting at #unicollab2018
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Webinar: A Learning Technology professional's guide to GDPR in the classroom | Association for Learning Technology

Webinar: A Learning Technology professional's guide to GDPR in the classroom | Association for Learning Technology | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
This session was led by Mark Glynn. DCU's Head of the Teaching Enhancement Unit will look at GDPR compliance from a teaching point of view.  Presenter Mark Glynn - DCU, Head of the Teaching Enhancement Unit   This event was  delivered via Blackboard Collaborate Ultra and the session recording can be accessed via https://go.alt.ac.uk/GDPR-LTGuideRecording and Google Slides from https://go.alt.ac.uk/GDPR-LTGuideSlides ; For more guidance on Blackboard Collaborate Ultra see our Webinar FAQs.  Register to receive an email reminder 1 hour before the session starts.
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Teacher mentoring UNICollaboration2018

Presentation "The Influence of Teacher Intervention on Quality of Interaction in a Telecollaboration" at UNICollaboration 2018 by Robert O’Dowd, Shannon Sauro …...
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Unicollaboration Keynote interactive document

Please use this document (short link: http://bit.ly/loopflipintercultural) to comment on various parts of my keynote at #unicollab2018 if you can't speak up. If you prefer to tweet, I'm @bali_maha - the slides and video for my keynote are available at: https://blog.mahabali.me/unicollab2018/ - live stream is at http://youtu.be/kAEun4RLyuw ; Thanks Maha Bali ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ You are a Muslim and a complete stranger asks you, within minutes of meeting you, “Why are you not Christian?” How do you feel? How do you react, respond? Why? My religion is my choice +1 I have the same issues when Muslims ask me about my atheism. Because it says it on my FB page. That was in the early days, not sure it is the case now Why should I? It's the same type of question as sb would ask me “why are you not Muslim?” Why are you not Muslim? I might be offended and try to get out of the conversation but I might also take the bait and respond with a question back (why aren’t you Muslim?)  Surprised, worried, tired Good question! Why do you ask? [a][b] Because of people like you. Would Jesus harass me like this?  Maybe you should be more Christian. What do you think about the “charitable gaze”? What can possibly be done differently? Many charities control access quite strictly to their community, but it is still a serious problem for them. You should try to understand what access might mean. I think reflecting on your reasons for going to meet any group. I think yours is a good example of the fact that often the charitable gift is meant to make the giver feel better about themselves first and foremost and to not feel guilty about possibly not doing more to actual change a given situation. +1 Opening a dialogue in which people are treated as someone who can communicate their needs - if you treat someone as a victim, to some extent you make them one. Listen to them, have a real conversation, share an activity. In Haiti, people call American service groups “owls” who come with wide eyes and make a lot of noise then fly away.   Can we find a way to let the donors be a part of the impact…to see the end result? Maybe they get to attend an event that was made possible by their donation? Seeing students perform with musical instruments their donation made possible, for instance? Seeking reciprocity This is difficult as people genuinely want to help, there are just not many models to follow. In telecollaboration/intercultural exchange, perhaps the parallel can be drawn to the “favor” that native speakers of English are performing “for” others when they “help” them learn English.  (Imperialistic overtones) so I suggest that next conference we can encourage people to present their research and practices in other languages with slides in English.  [c]  Inspiring keynote here from #oer18 last week https://youtu.be/PBIiBMknYso (I know you didn’t ask for this gift but you don’t have to watch it) This also applies to « equipping » of teachers with technology that they never asked for. What are your beliefs/experiences on the depth of intercultural encounters when living in a country different than your own versus synchronous video versus asynchronous conversations? I thinks it depends on the distance between your own culture and the culture of the country where you live. The distance can be presented in different areas such as physical distance,  language, culture, education, etc. particularly between the East and the West. I think you can have intercultural experiences in various ways. I moved away from the south of the UK to the north to go to university and I learned a great deal about myself as well as the north. Perhaps not so possible now. When I work online with my students I also learn a great deal about their contexts and this impacts on the way I view their situations. You can feel quite lonely living a foreign country, you probably can’t feel like this in OIE, you feel more safe. Embodiment, serendipity, food In an asynchronous conversation things are already digested or translated.  The most important/deepest things are often the visceral ones that you haven't had time to reflect on or put into words. These can happen in synchronous video though, with the advantage that it's recorded for reflection later.   I teach languages so have always been a big promoter of the value of the year abroad. However, it will always depend on engagement- you can have that whole year with very little engagement, or not live in the culture, but with real passion and interaction. https://soundcloud.com/maha-abdelmoneim/early-morning You spend time ‘treading on eggshells’ and become hyper-sensitive esp for face to face encounters. Easier in virtual and asynch.. Virtual encounters may not have the physical cues we have in real life but it can be as meaningful and it is possible to experience connections The environment is limited to the screen in a virtual world The eye embraces so much more. You do not choose what to look at but what people want to show you. And as sarah said more senses are stimulated One downside to physical exchange is it can work better (maybe?) for more outgoing students who can take full advantage of it. >perhaps, but depends on how you organize it? I wonder if in online communication sociopragmatic rules and netiquette vary from culture to culture as much as in f2f communication. i.e.: politeness, turn taking, etc.?? Do you have examples of stereotyping about stereotyping?  As a woman my bosses (mostly male) often assume that I will comply - I may do on the surface! Yes, you must / some man, obviously. Some people just negate stereotypes fully for the sake of being stereotypes and without even looking for this one percent of truth in this stereotype. I have a FAQ in my head to deal with those stereotyping questions. Try to deal with them in a light-hearted way. Other questions/comments Do your students manage to have other participants talk about other things than religion? [a]Nice reply! [b]true! I'm clearly too passive agressive :) [c]Translanguaging in action - I like it!
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Part of Maha Bali's UNICollaboration keynote at Krakow was this interactive discussion which collected contributions from the audience.
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European Commission - PRESS RELEASES - Press release - Erasmus+ goes virtual

The European Commission has today launched Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange, a project to promote intercultural dialogue and improve the skills of at least 25,000 young people through digital learning tools over the next two years. The project covers the 33 Erasmus+ programme countries and the Southern Mediterranean region covering Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestine*, Syria and Tunisia.  The online version of Erasmus+ will complement the traditional physical mobility programme and could in the future be extended to other regions of the world.  Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport, Tibor Navracsics, said: "While a very successful programme, Erasmus+ is not always accessible to everyone. Through Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange we will facilitate more contacts between people, reach youth from different social backgrounds and promote intercultural understanding. This online tool will connect more young people from the EU with their peers from other countries; it will build bridges and help develop skills such as critical thinking, media literacy, foreign languages and teamwork.”  Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange will connect young people, youth workers, students and academics from European countries and the Southern neighbourhood of the EU through moderated discussions, transnational project groups, open online courses and advocacy training. For instance, young people from different countries will be able to connect once a week to discuss topics such as economic developments or climate change facilitated by a moderator and on the basis of preparatory material distributed beforehand.  All activities will take place as part of higher education programmes or organised youth projects. During its preparatory phase, Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange raised interest among universities and youth organisations and 50 partnerships have already been set up and 40 people have been trained as facilitators to moderate debates.  Contacts and exchanges with peers from abroad are a great opportunity to acquire new knowledge and skills as well as to enhance tolerance and mutual acceptance. Virtual Exchange promotes intercultural dialogue between young people, in line with the Paris Declaration agreed at the informal meeting of EU Education Ministers in March 2015. The Declaration aims at promoting citizenship and the common values of freedom, tolerance and non-discrimination through education. Background  During the pilot phase, with a budget of €2 million until December 2018, Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange will reach at least 8,000 young people. If successful, the aim is to renew it until the end of 2019 to reach 17,000 more people. In the future, Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange could become a regular action and be expanded to reach even more young people in other regions.  Erasmus+ already supports learning and teaching mobility between the EU's Southern Neighbourhood and the EU. Since 2015, over 1,000 projects have been funded between European and Southern Mediterranean universities, which plan to enable around 15,000 students and staff from the Southern Mediterranean to come to Europe, while over 7,000 Europeans will teach or study in those countries. In addition, around 2,200 young people from countries in the Southern neighbourhood of the EU and youth workers are involved in non-formal learning projects each year.  For more information  Homepage: Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange   * This designation shall not be construed as recognition of a State of Palestine and is without prejudice to the individual positions of the Member States on this issue.
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Growing an Open Movement: Claudio Ruiz on CC's Global Network

Growing an Open Movement: Claudio Ruiz on CC's Global Network | computer mediated communication | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, Creative Commons publicly launched the CC Global Network, a program designed to provide new and simple ways for anyone in the world to get involved with Creative Commons and the CC community.
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The Case for OER: a Conversation with Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Learning '18 steering committee member Dr. Steve Greenlaw hosts Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani in an interview devoted to Open Educational Resources: thei
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