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Online Learning Is Broken, And Versal Wants To Fix It

Online Learning Is Broken, And Versal Wants To Fix It | Computer Education | Scoop.it
Bored by online learning? Versal's "gadget" method aims to make every lecture interactive.

Via Marty Koenig
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Marty Koenig's curator insight, July 12, 2013 12:17 PM

I agree, most training is boring, low tech, and talking heads. There's no compelling stories or engagement for experential learning. I'm watchin Versal and so should you.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:26 PM

Great idea, learning should be challenging, interesting, thought-provoking, and of course 'intereactive'. It's free, take advantage of it.

http://readwrite.com/2013/07/09/online-learning-is-broken-and-versal-wants-to-fix-it#awesm=~obHi3N9AoUH7RK



Need a Business Plan Template? Find it at my site, here is the link: http://www.business-funding-insider.com/free-business-plan-template.html

Roey Hilliard's curator insight, July 15, 2013 8:30 PM

Looking forward to checking this out!

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How to Change the World: The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint

How to Change the World: The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint | Computer Education | Scoop.it
I suffer from something called Ménière’s disease—don’t worry, you cannot get it from reading my blog. The symptoms of Ménière’s include hearing loss, tinnitus (a constant ringing sound), and vertigo.
Nicholas Potter's insight:

Great structure for a VC presentation. Also nice tips if you must use PowerPoint. 30 Pt is good for mobile, too.

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You Won’t Finish This Article

You Won’t Finish This Article | Computer Education | Scoop.it
I’m going to keep this brief, because you’re not going to stick around for long. I’ve already lost a bunch of you. For every 161 people who landed on this page, about 61 of you—38 percent—are already gone.

Via Guillaume Decugis, Ally Greer, Two Pens
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Terry Patterson's comment, July 20, 2013 12:37 PM
See Brian, there is no "cut off" for good articles, just user ability and interest to finish the read... yes, the medium helps (in your case you mentioned "listen") whatever works. In any case, believing that a user won't read an article because it is too long is a fallacy. Someone who believes that simply is not understanding their audience and not giving them what they need and how they need it in digital format.
Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's comment, July 20, 2013 3:07 PM
As platforms change for content exposure with filters such as curation, on site like Scoop.it, writers need to remember that their readers may be looking for more information than a brief 500 word article because they have clicked through from a filtered source, not a random Google search.
Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's comment, July 20, 2013 3:14 PM
Terry, when I look an article written by someone like Avinash Kaushik, I know that what I'm going to read is well thought out with sources to back it up. Not just something written as Google bait. eg. http://www.kaushik.net/avinash/analytics-tips-improve-search-social-compound-metrics/
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How I Taught Myself To Code In Eight Weeks

How I Taught Myself To Code In Eight Weeks | Computer Education | Scoop.it
To a lot of non-developers, learning to code seems like an impossibly daunting task. However, thanks to a number of great resources that have recently...
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What are the top 5 ways physicians use tablets and smartphones in their medical practice?

What are the top 5 ways physicians use tablets and smartphones in their medical practice? | Computer Education | Scoop.it

A survey of 1400 doctors reveals the top five ways they are using tablets and smartphones in their clinical practices.

 

In a clinical work setting, doctors who have electronic health records said they use their smartphones in clinical settings every day to:

 

Send and receive emails (65 percent);

 

Use apps (51 percent);

 

Instant messaging (50 percent);

 

Researching information about medications (35 percent);

 

Communicating with other physicians (32 percent).

 

 

But switch “smartphones” to “tablets” and you get this response:

 

 

Send and receive e-mails (52.4 percent);

 

Accessing electronic health records (50.6 percent);

 

Accessing diagnostic information (41.7 percent);

 

Research information about medication (33.3 percent);

 

Staying up to date with medical journals and papers (29.8 percent).

 

 

Among the other findings were

 

A little more than 60 percent access electronic medical records through their device’s browser rather than thru the vendor’s app.

 

One-third of EHR users and one-quarter of non-EHR users use a tablet device in their medical practice.

 

More than 70 percent of tablet users who access EHR through them have a password.

 

About 32 percent have a device tracker app installed on their tablet and the ability to remotely wipe all data on their tablet if lost or stolen (31 percent).

 

EHR users spend 25 hours on their tablet each week, with a greater amount of time spent on business (59%) than for personal reasons (41 percent).

 


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Seminar on Seminars: The Suslick Research Group

Seminar on Seminars: The Suslick Research Group | Computer Education | Scoop.it
Research in the Suslick Group at the University of Illinois: Sonochemistry, Chemical Sensing, and Bioinorganic Chemistry
Nicholas Potter's insight:

Particularly useful for scientific audiences, but most applies more widely as well.

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Why do people make bad slides?

Why do people make bad slides? | Computer Education | Scoop.it
For years experts in psychology, design and even technology have decried Powerpoint and its many evils.  Every few months another blog post, or presenter, explains in detailed outrage why the a pre...

Via Two Pens
Nicholas Potter's insight:

Follows Tufte's advice to ditch PowerPoint format; contains a number of interesting links.

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Two Pens's curator insight, June 7, 2013 12:42 PM

People make bad slides because they lack aesthetic judgment and design taste. Develop those and you'll make better slides.

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Presentations Infographic: Making Your Message Stick

Presentations Infographic: Making Your Message Stick | Computer Education | Scoop.it
With over 350 Powerpoint presentations given each second across the globe, how does one go about making theirs stand out from all the others?

Via Dr. Karen Dietz, Marty Koenig
Nicholas Potter's insight:

Reinforces the ides of chunking. The '3 to 7 points' idea supports structuring a lecture as 3 chunks with 2-3 points in each chunk. Lots of visuals.

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Audrey's comment, August 15, 2013 4:20 PM
Thank you. I am using the format for my presentations
Audrey's comment, August 15, 2013 4:20 PM
Thank you. I am using the format for my presentations
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, August 16, 2013 4:28 PM
How wonderful Audrey! I hope you do really well :)
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3 Chunking Strategies That Every Instructional Designer Should Know

3 Chunking Strategies That Every Instructional Designer Should Know | Computer Education | Scoop.it
One of the main concepts that leads to successful e-Learning course design is Information Chunking. But what is chunking? Why is it embedded in the world of instructional design?

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Karen Bruce's curator insight, February 23, 2017 8:51 AM

One of the interesting elements about this article is that in step 1 of their chunking method the concept of "less is more" is highlighted. The textbook (Writing Training Materials That Work by Foshay, Silber & Stelnicki) focuses chunking on short-term memory storage but does not elaborate on how to get the important information presented. It is important to be thinking about people's capabilities when considering content. The textbook (Writing Training Materials That Work by Foshay, Silber & Stelnicki) points out that people generally remember 7 things at a time. The article also discusses organizing the information into modules and tying them together appropriately. I think this will help with getting only important information into the content too, because if something is missing or unnecessary it may become apparent when the instructional designer (ID) is creating the layout and ensuring the chunks are appropriately related and enough information is present. When keeping these concepts in mind along with this articles suggestions of boiling down the information to what is most important an ID can create successful learning material. counts

 

Karen's Response:

 

Hi, Anna!

 

Thanks for sharing such a useful resource. I appreciated the practical strategies for establishing a hierarchy, removing any redundant or unnecessary information, and organizing the material in a logical fashion. I was interested in how much information would constitute the "right amount of information," but I suspect that's a question that doesn't have a generalizable answer, since it would depend on the content and learners.

Cara North's comment, February 24, 2017 8:45 AM
This is a popular scoop. You have good taste Anna!
Nathan Hawk's comment, February 26, 2017 7:29 AM
Very interesting read, and highly useful strategies for chunking. The second strategy (to create subgroups within groups) I think mirrors very well suggestions with our reading material due to limitations in short term memory. This is probably good design regardless of benefits to reducing cognitive overload.