Computational Philosophy News
21 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Paul Oppenheimer from Visualization Techniques and Practice
Scoop.it!

How to use FF Chartwell

How to use FF Chartwell | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

FF Chartwell Font

 

This font lets you take simple strings of numbers and transform them into charts. The visualized data remains editable, allowing for hassle-free updates and styling.   I have been looking for something like this to create better looking charts and graphs than what excel, powerpoint, or survey monkey can do with their built in chart generators which are ugly.

 

The demo screencast uses Photoshop, so I had look up how to find the Open Type menu for WORD.    You have to go to the advanced menus on fonts which is a little arrow underneath the basic font commands.  I was hoping I could use in PPT, but PPT does not have Open Type integrated.  You can use it in Publisher.  It requires exporting as a jpg.

 

Slightly more tedious but it slowed me down enough to think about how I wanted to present the findings - what was the insight to ask.   

 

 


Via Beth Kanter
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Oppenheimer
Scoop.it!

Three Marks Of Real Data Science - TechCrunch

Three Marks Of Real Data Science - TechCrunch | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it
TechCrunch
Three Marks Of Real Data Science
TechCrunch
As a venture investor looking to invest in data-driven companies, telling real data science apart from pseudo science is difficult, but it's critically important.
Paul Oppenheimer's insight:

Which computational methods actually help to answer the question on the table?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Oppenheimer from Digital Philosophy
Scoop.it!

Teaching philosophy to children? It's a great idea

Teaching philosophy to children? It's a great idea | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it
Michelle Sowey: Studying philosophy cultivates doubt without helplessness, and confidence without hubris. I’ve watched children evolve to be more rational and open-minded because of it

Via Robert Farrow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Oppenheimer from Digital Philosophy
Scoop.it!

A-level Philosophy Teaching Materials

A-level Philosophy Teaching Materials | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it
We are pleased to announce our first booklet of teaching materials for A-level Philosophy: Nietzsche's Critique of Morality.

The booklet contains six short essays with comprehension questions and puzzles for discussion.


It is designed to facilitate work that meets the criterion of independent critical engagement.

This is intended for the 'Why Should I Be Moral?' module of the AS-level as well as the 'Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil' module of the A2-level.

 

It is available to download and distribute under a Creative Commons license.


Via Robert Farrow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Oppenheimer from Philosophy Hub
Scoop.it!

Johan van Benthem discusses logical dynamics (Podcast)

Johan van Benthem discusses logical dynamics (Podcast) | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it

Logic is assumed to have deductive reasoning as its subject matter. A valid deductive argument is one in which it’s impossible for the premises to be true and the conclusion false. For instance, if it’s true that I’m a German composer, then it absolutely must be the case that I am a composer. I couldn’t not be one! The conclusion of the argument is just inevitable. Over the past century, philosophical and mathematical logicians have developed a wide array of formal techniques to study arguments of this sort...

 

Source : lucian.uchicago.edu


Via Yannick Kilberger
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Oppenheimer
Scoop.it!

How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up - New York Times

How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up - New York Times | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it
New York Times
How Caffeine Evolved to Help Plants Survive and Help People Wake Up
New York Times
An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of Coffea canephora, one of the main sources of coffee beans.
Paul Oppenheimer's insight:

. . . turning coffee into theorems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Oppenheimer
Scoop.it!

Computational Theology | Science Blogs | WIRED

Computational Theology | Science Blogs | WIRED | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it
There is a burgeoning field within philosophy known as computational philosophy. This term covers a large amount of work being done, including everything from computationally discovering connections between different philosophical topics to artificial intelligence and the philosophy of mind. One fun example is how automated search methods found a connection between a medieval philosophical idea…
Paul Oppenheimer's insight:

Computational Philosophy in the News:  In his blog post Computational Theology (4 September 2014), Samuel Arbesman notes that Oppenheimer and Zalta have used computational methods to discover a very simple argument in philosophy, whereas computational methods are more frequently used to discover complex arguments.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Oppenheimer
Scoop.it!

The Joy of Breaking Down - LifeEdited

The Joy of Breaking Down - LifeEdited | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it
Design your life to include more money, health and happiness with less stuff, space and energy.
Paul Oppenheimer's insight:

Life is not that interesting without breakdowns.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Oppenheimer from Early modern philosophy (mostly natural)
Scoop.it!

Hobbes fondateur

Hobbes fondateur | Computational Philosophy News | Scoop.it

Cécile Voisset-Veysseyre. Compte rendu du livre de Philippe Crignon, De l’incarnation à la répresentation (Classiques Garnier). “Un travail universitaire qui problématise la question de la représentation politique en s’appuyant sur la philosophie de Thomas Hobbes”.


Via Dennis Des Chene
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Oppenheimer from Philosophy Hub
Scoop.it!

History of Philosophy's Greatest Hits: Epictetus

Episode Five: Epictetus: You Can Chain My Leg, But Not My Will.

 

Peter Adamson, Professor of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at King's College London and host of the History of Philosophy podcast, discusses the Stoic Epictetus and his ideas about free will.

 

Source : historyofphilosophy.net


Via Yannick Kilberger
more...
No comment yet.