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Report: Apple's Future of TV Is an Actual Television - Gizmodo

Report: Apple's Future of TV Is an Actual Television - Gizmodo | Compter Science | Scoop.it
Report: Apple's Future of TV Is an Actual Television
Gizmodo
We've said it time and time again: Something like half a dozen companies are working on their own versions of the future of TV.
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Firefox Beta Introduces Preliminary Support for Social API | Future ...

Be the first to know what's new with upcoming Firefox releases.
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Mark Zuckerberg Is the Most Followed Person on Google+, Site Says

Mark Zuckerberg Is the Most Followed Person on Google+, Site Says | Compter Science | Scoop.it
The Google+ community apparently values what its chief competitor has to say over its creators. That's the takeaway from a site that purports to keep track of the 100 people with the most followers on Google+. The list says Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is the most-followed person on Google's newborn social network network—beating out Google CEO Larry Page and company co-founder Sergey Brin.

Zuckerberg stands atop the list at socialstatistics.com with 29,543 followers. Page holds the No. 2 spot with 19,878, and Brin is fourth with 15,636. Vic Gundotra, senior vice president of social for Google, is No. 3. The rest of the list reads like a who's who of tech geeks and media people, with This Week in Tech's Leo Laporte, TechCrunch's MG Seigler, and Mashable's Pete Cashmore all placing in the top 25.

The creator of the site, The Next Web's Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten, says he crawls Google+ once a day for the rankings. He manually chose the people to keep track of, but he expects to have the site actively search for new accounts soon. As for why he chose mainly tech people for his list, Zanten says that's who's there.

"I think the technical elite got to it first," he told PCMag in an online chat. "So that influences the results now. Was the same with Twitter at first. The rock stars and politicians came later."

Although there's been some question as to whether the Zuckerberg profile on Google+ really belongs to the Facebook founder, tech blogger Robert Scoble (No. 5 on Zanten's list) has apparently confirmed that it's genuine. Scoble tweeted on Sunday that Zuckerberg had responded to a text, saying "Why are people so surprised that I'd have a Google account?"

Even though Zuckerberg is on more follow lists than anyone else on Google+, he has yet to post an public update on the network. Visitors to his profile page are met with the default "There are no messages to display" notice. In his About page, he succinctly says "I make things," and lists Palo Alto, CA, as a place he's lived. Zuckerberg likely now has even more followers since Zanten's site last made a tally, since his profile shows that 34,759 people have him in their Circles (Google+'s way of organizing friends) as of this morning.

Zanten is apparently crawling more than just follower data for his site. He says his statistics show a wide gender gap among the users of Google+. The current ratio of men to women on the network is 88 percent to 10 percent, he says, with 2 percent listing their gender as "other."

Before counting followers on Google+, Zanten created the site TwitterCounter.com, which is said to track statistics of over 14 million Twitter users.
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CRISP Presents Self-Repairing Chip!

CRISP Presents Self-Repairing Chip! | Compter Science | Scoop.it
The CRISP ('Cutting edge reconfigurable ICS [Integrated Circuit Systems] for stream processing') project, which clinched EUR 2.8 million under the 'Information and communication technologies' (ICT) Theme of the EU's Seventh Framework Program (FP7), developed a new technique designed to take advantage of the natural redundancy in multicore designs so as to enable the use of reconfigurable cores and resource management during the program's lifecycle phase.
Scientists are aware that a number of defects, like failing to run memory operations, will make a core of no use. But designing chips that are error-free is not very viable. So developing fault-tolerant architectures that work together with mechanisms able to detect and fix errors, or ease their effect, could help circuit designers to use defective chips instead of throwing them in the bin.
Chips are vulnerable because of manufacturing defects, environmental disturbances that play havoc on production, and the effects of ageing.
Some experts believe that salvaging the chips would be very beneficial, in addition to using spare resources and implementing an error detection, recovery and repair technique. Doing so would give their reliability a boost, make them more true to form and even usable if faulty.
The CRISP project partners recently presented a self-testing, self-repairing nine-core chip at the recent DATE 2011 conference in France, showing how the natural redundancy in multicore designs can be used thanks to CRISP's technique to use dynamically reconfigurable cores and resource management.
"A key innovation is the Dependability Manager, a test generation unit which accesses the built-in, self-test scan chain to effectively perform production testing at run time," New Electronics quotes Gerard Rauwerda of the Dutch-based Recore Systems, which coordinated the CRISP project, as saying at the DATE 2011 event. "This determines which cores are working correctly." The project partners developed an IP (internet protocol) 'wrapper' around Recore's reconfigurable dsp [digital signal processing] core.'
Adding multiplexers gives the software the means to switch from functional mode to diagnosis mode in order to detect faults. 'There are some timing issues to consider, as the circuitry is running at, say, 200 megahertz (MHz) online, instead of 25MHz offline,' Mr Rauwerda says.
Once analysis of the device is complete, the run time resource manager reroutes tasks to error-free parts of the chip. So the chip is repaired and can continue running.
Mr. Rauwerda points out that the technique could be applied to various cores. At present, the project's approach is to identify unusable faulty cores, and to determine if the core's memory can still be used. "In the future, the aim is to diagnose to a deeper level, to see if we can use more parts of a faulty core," he explains. "A fault tolerant interconnect is going to be very important. We will need to insert test structures into the network on chip interconnect IP for better diagnosis."

More information: http://www.crisp-project.eu/
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To get Lion, you must get the Snow Leopard

To get Lion, you must get  the Snow Leopard | Compter Science | Scoop.it
Apple has recently launched its new product the OS X Lion. However, in a strange decision by Apple, the new OS will be delivered over the web via the Mac App Store. In addition, the Mac App Store is only availble on the Snow Leopard so those wanting to upgrading to Lion must grab the Snow Leopard first, which require users to grab the Leopard first. Users wanting to skip Leopard would have to purchase the the $170 Mac Box Set, which contains both Leopard and Snow Leopard. However, some users have reported success in skiping the Leopard version before going to the Snow Leopard, which is technically breaking the Terms of Conditions. However, Apple making this near impossible by only offering the Lion as a digital download.

The recent Mac OS X upgrades is in my opinion, similiar to the Windows Service Pack since they are not "whole" operating system and require the previous release to run. On a plus side, the new operating system only cost $29.99 or about £18.34. However, the decision by Apple to go entirely digital can cause numerious problems to users. For one thing, users with an extremely slow connection would suffer the most. Most operating systems are many gigabytes large, which would take hours or even days to download over an extremely slow connection (dialup users may take months ). Edit: In a recent article I found that the OS X Lion would just be 4 GB large. That's still too large for confort for those running slow OS'S

This upgrade path would cause problems for those running Windows using Boot Camp since they require specific drivers from Apple before Microsoft's OS will work properly on a Mac. Most of the time these drivers can be obtained through the OS X installation disc, although it also can get be obtained them from Apple as a download via Boot Camp Assistant.


But if the Assistant cannot find the drivers, then you are out of luck unless you have an OS X disk.

Another problem that user may encounter is installation failure. operating system installs is not as easy as pie. There is a high possibliity that it may fail and the user may end up with a dead system. In addition, since the new Lion install is peresumably be designed to be over the top installation keeping all the settings of the previous version, all the problems the user may face with the previous operating system (ie driver issues) may be carried over. Malware may or may not be carried over. In many cases Mac doing a fresh install would do it some good as the machine ages.

A third problem is recovery option in case of PC failure. On most OS's if an OS fails, the user can reinstall the OS via the CD or use the CD onboard repair tool to boot. But unless you have the disk or bothered to burn the recovery tool, you would be stuck with a dead operating system.

A fourth problem is the installation path. Presumably those owning OS X Tiger would have to buy the Leopard OS before upgrading to a Snow Leopard and finally upgrading to a Lion. The total of the upgrade would amount to more than £150.81 (£132.47 for the box retail set (Amazon) plus £18.34 for the Lion upgrade). Those with older OS's would have to pay even more. On the other hand, Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium is retailing on Amazon for just £118.58 or just £81.95 for the upgrade from XP or Vista. Those owning an even older Mac would face a bigger cost to upgrade their OS (Old Mac --> Tiger --> Leopard --> Snow Leopard --> Lion )
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The Future of Libraries - The Next Web

The Future of Libraries - The Next Web | Compter Science | Scoop.it
The Future of Libraries The Next Web So when journalism professor Jeff Jarvis asked Cerf what he saw as the future of libraries , his expressions of “deep concern” about the way information will be stored and passed through generations perhaps held...
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CBC Books - The future of the printed word

CBC Books - The future of the printed word | Compter Science | Scoop.it
The CBC Book Portal (RT @cbcbooks: Writer Alberto Manguel weighs in on the future of the printed word http://t.co/w5layVJo...)...
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Mac OS X Cursors for Windows 7, Vista and XP – Easy Installer

Mac OS X Cursors for Windows 7, Vista and XP – Easy Installer | Compter Science | Scoop.it
Here is a little something for all of you Mac-lovers who use Windows. A quick and easy way to have Mac OS X mouse cursors on a PC running Windows 7, Vista or XP. Although personally I’m not a Mac person, one of the first things I do after installing a fresh copy of Windows is change the mouse pointers to the Mac OS X ones. Usually this means I have to download a zip of individual pointer icons and then manually assign them to the right cursors in the Control Panel, which is a bit annoying.Well, I don’t have to do this anymore. This morning I put together a nice and easy installer that does all that manual work for me. You can download the installer using the link below.

http://tinyurl.com/3vug2dv
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Angry Birds RIO Carnival Upheaval [Full Spoiler] | Android Community

Angry Birds RIO Carnival Upheaval [Full Spoiler] | Android Community | Compter Science | Scoop.it
Ding ding ding SQUAWK, you know what that means, time for an Angry Birds update – today’s update is to the movie tie-in game Angry Birds RIO, the expansion another chapter from the movie in what they’re calling Carnival Upheaval. What you’ll be finding here is a new bird, (one half of the two blue bird shooter you were using before,) this new bird floating normally through the sky with a several hit combo when activated. An oddball bit of fodder to be sure. Also look for this set of levels to be the most epileptic of all the levels, more seizure inducing than any level before!

This set of levels includes the first half of Angry Birds RIO Carnival Upheaval, the second part coming whenever the fine folks at Rovio decide that we’re worthy of it. This first half contains 15 levels, each of them taking place on a series of carnival floats, the entirety of the street carnival on either sides of the street you’re going down. No beads allowed, no drinks either, because you’ll need to use everything in your arsenal just to pay attention to the game because there is a LOT of confetti coming down and you WILL get a headache if you look too long at the screen.

You’ll find a couple new bouncy balloon blocks on the ground in several stages here, the main challenge in these levels being the surprising amount of stone blocks to break down or push for your benefit. Behold a series of levels where it’s the non-interactive environment that makes the game the hardest to play. Rovio, if you’re listening, feel free to release an update that allows you to turn OFF confetti.

Second set of 15, still locked
This expansion of the Angry Birds RIO game is available right this second in the Amazon Appstore and will eventually be available for everyone who does not like to use the Amazon Appstore, this availability being through the Android Market. Have at it! And if you’re looking for golden secrets, be sure to check the labeled boxes for the most part, and in at least one part a labeled beachball!
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Phase Change Memory-Based 'Moneta' System Points to the Future of Computer Storage

Phase Change Memory-Based 'Moneta' System Points to the Future of Computer Storage | Compter Science | Scoop.it
ScienceDaily (June 3, 2011) — A University of California, San Diego faculty-student team is about to demonstrate a first-of-its kind, phase-change memory solid state storage device that provides performance thousands of times faster than a conventional hard drive and up to seven times faster than current state-of-the-art solid-state drives (SSDs).
The device was developed in the Computer Science and Engineering department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and will be on exhibit June 7-8 at DAC 2011, the world's leading technical conference and trade show on electronic design automation, with the support of several industry partners, including Micron Technology, BEEcube and Xilinx. The storage system, called "Moneta," uses phase-change memory (PCM), an emerging data storage technology that stores data in the crystal structure of a metal alloy called a chalcogenide. PCM is faster and simpler to use than flash memory -- the technology that currently dominates the SSD market.
Moneta marks the latest advancement in solid state drives (SSDs). Unlike conventional hard disk drives, solid state storage drives have no moving parts. Today's SSDs use flash memory and can be found in a wide range of consumer electronics such as iPads and laptops. Although faster than hard disk, flash memory is still too slow to meet modern data storage and analysis demands, particularly in the area of high performance computing where the ability to sift through enormous volumes of data quickly is critical. Examples include storing and analyzing scientific data collected through environmental sensors, or even web searches through Google.
"As a society, we can gather all this data very, very quickly -- much faster than we can analyze it with conventional, disk-based storage systems," said Steven Swanson, professor of Computer Science and Engineering and director of the Non-Volatile Systems Lab (NVSL). "Phase-change memory-based solid state storage devices will allow us to sift through all of this data, make sense of it, and extract useful information much faster. It has the potential to be revolutionary."
PCM Memory Chips
To store data, the PCM memory chips switch the alloy between a crystalline and amorphous state based on the application of heat through an electrical current. To read the data, the chips use a smaller current to determine which state the chalcogenide is in.
Moneta uses Micron Technology's first-generation PCM chips and can read large sections of data at a maximum rate of 1.1 gigabytes per second and write data at up to 371 megabytes per second. For smaller accesses (e.g., 512 B), Moneta can read at 327 megabytes per second and write at 91 megabytes per second , or between two and seven times faster than a state-of-the-art, flash-based SSD. Moneta also provides lower latency for each operation and should reduce energy requirements for data-intensive applications.
A Glimpse at Computers of the Future
Swanson hopes to build the second generation of the Moneta storage device in the next six to nine months and says the technology could be ready for market in just a few years as the underlying phase-change memory technology improves. The development has also revealed a new technology challenge.
"We've found that you can build a much faster storage device, but in order to really make use of it, you have to change the software that manages it as well. Storage systems have evolved over the last 40 years to cater to disks, and disks are very, very slow," said Swanson. "Designing storage systems that can fully leverage technologies like PCM requires rethinking almost every aspect of how a computer system's software manages and accesses storage. Moneta gives us a window into the future of what computer storage systems are going to look like, and gives us the opportunity now to rethink how we design computer systems in response."
In addition to Swanson, the Moneta team includes Computer Science and Engineering Professor and Chair Rajesh Gupta, who is also associate director of UC San Diego's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology. Student team members from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering include Ameen Akel, Adrian Caulfield, Todor Mollov, Arup De, and Joel Coburn.
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