Competitive Edge
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Competitive Edge
Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
Curated by Marc Kneepkens
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Don’t Ask People What They Want, Watch What They Do

Don’t Ask People What They Want, Watch What They Do | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

Irene Au, a design partner at Khosla Ventures and former Head of Design at Google, shares her lessons learned as a behavior designer.

Q: You have an impressive background as a designer at Google, Yahoo, and now at Khosla Ventures. Could you describe how your design role translates in venture capital?

Irene Au: As entrepreneurs start to recognize how crucial design and design thinking are to the success of their company, they are motivated to understand how to hire good designers, how to position them inside their organizations, and what this means for their product and development.

My role is to help our portfolio companies become successful, particularly as it relates to designing user experience. Iwrote an e-book on design and venture capital that discusses this emerging role designers have at venture capital firms. Read more: click image or title.

 

FREE Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km

Growthink teaches how to FUND, build, grow, and sell a great business: http://bit.ly/2hn5ROb


Via Oliver Durrer
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

..."There’s a dialectic relationship between the things that we make and the way that we are; they’re both informing each other.

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The Simple Rules That Could Transform How You Launch Your Product

The Simple Rules That Could Transform How You Launch Your Product | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
LaunchKit co-founder and CEO Brenden Mulligan, one of Product Hunt's most prolific users, shares his tips for a successful product launch.

After months in stealth and bullish reviews from beta users, it was Cluster’s time to fly. Co-founder and CEO Brenden Mulligan knew no one had cracked private, group photo sharing at scale. He could envision the headline he wanted: “Cluster Finally Solves Collaborative Photo Sharing.” But the week before it debuted, competitor Albumatic launched (now defunct), to the fanfare of technology bloggers and journalists. Instantly, the conversation changed from “Amazing — can I write about this?” to “How are you different from Albumatic?”

Speed as a Habit

With over a dozen product launches over his career, Mulligan has learned what he can control and when to let go. On his own, he’s launched six products — two of which, Onesheet and ArtistData, became startups that were acquired. With Cluster, he’s built and released seven mobile apps on three platforms in two years. Now, through his latest venture, LaunchKit, Mulligan and his team have introduced a set of developer tools that have tallied over 3,500 votes on Product Hunt, a site where he's launched more products than almost anyone else.

In this exclusive interview, Mulligan shares five rules for startups releasing new products. A well-designed launch includes everything from messaging to metrics and press relations to marketing hooks. Every launch is a leap, but Mulligan’s tips will give your products the best lift. Read more: click image or title.

 

Did you know that you can turn your business plan into a securities offering document to raise seed, development and expansion capital from individual investors legally? 

Check out….     http://bit.ly/1Lr9RrI

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Simplicity, streamlining, #metrics, marketing, press, #influencers...

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The 50% Rule for Traction

The 50% Rule for Traction | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

http://snip.ly/naLT

If you’re starting a company, chances are you can build a product. Almost every failed startup has a product.

What failed startups don’t have are enough customers.

Marc Andreessen, founder of Netscape and VC firm Andreessen-Horowitz, sums up this problem:

“The number one reason that we pass on entrepreneurs we’d otherwise like to back is their focusing on product to the exclusion of everything else. Many entrepreneurs who build great products simply don’t have a good distribution strategy. Even worse is when they insist that they don’t need one, or call [their] no distribution strategy a ‘viral marketing strategy.’”

A common story goes like this: founders build something people want by following a sound product development strategy. They spend their time building new features early users say they want.

Then, after months of heads-down product development, they launch, only to become frustrated when customers don’t flock to them.

(This is guest post by Justin Mares, Co-author of Traction. If you build a great product in the forest, it will die too in the forest, unless you also build inroads to your product.
In this post, Justin shares this key lesson for when and how to pursue channel building while running lean.
Enjoy…  Read more:
http://snip.ly/naLT



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.l/1aKy7km

"Growthink is a full-service business, representing you through the whole process - very important value-added service. We've been very impressed with the professionalism and kindness that Growthink has shown us in the rather complicated world of commercial financing."

Debra Soto
Freeballer Surfwear

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Develop a product and don't forget the marketing. Start doing it at the same time is the idea of this article. The 50% rule makes a lot of sense.

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Marc Andreessen's Best Advice: Build Your Passion Before Your Startup

Marc Andreessen's Best Advice: Build Your Passion Before Your Startup | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
Are we passionate about a product, an idea, or a company and the entrepreneur lifestyle?

...

“The way we think about it is that there are products that become startups, and then there are startups that try to build a product,” he said....

 

Read more: click image or title.

 

 

FREE Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km

 

 

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

A lot of #entrepreneurs build products and companies to make money. Marc Andreessen wants to see #founders to be passionalte about what they do first.

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This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it

This is the Product Death Cycle. Why it happens, and how to break out of it | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

The hardest part of any new product launch is the beginning, when it’s not quite working, and you’re iterating and molding the experience to fix it. It may be the hardest phase, but it’s also the most fun. The Product Death Cycle All of this was on my mind when I saw a great tweet from  about a year ago, on the Product Death Cycle, when things go wrong. David Bland, a management consultant based in San Francisco, tweeted this diagram:

This is what I’m calling the Product Death Cycle
– @davidjbland

A year ago when I saw this, I retweeted this diagram right away, and a year later, it’s hit 1,400+ RTs overall. This diagram has resonated with a ton of people because sadly, we’ve seen this Product Death Cycle happen many times. We’ve maybe even fallen into it ourselves – it’s all too easy. I’ve written about this phase before, in After the Techcrunch bump: Life in the Trough of Sorrow.  As well as some thoughts and strategies related to getting to product/market fit sooner rather than later.

Let’s talk about each step of this cycle, why it happens, and present a list of questions/provocations that might allow us to escape.

Read more: click image or title.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great analysis by Andrew Chen. Create that business model that keeps on producing new clients.

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Develop an experience, not just a product | The Venture Company

Develop an experience, not just a product | The Venture Company | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

My 3-year-old daughter uses my iPhone to play music videos and YouTube videos and has not touched a PC (or better, a Mac) yet. With the same content available on either she's obviously seen me operate my Mac and looks over my shoulder now and then, but finds all the keys and even the "Magic-mouse" complicated. Clearly a usage experience is more important to her than sheer processing power. Sounds familiar doesn't it? Nintendo anyone? What I see in so many early business plans today is the old-fashioned notion of deep technology expertise, something most traditional investors still harp on. I see too many BMW engines being developed without attention being paid to the development of The Ultimate Driving Experience®. True, you can't build the driving experience without great engines, but BMW, like no other vendor understands that the total experience is the selling point. In the end, technology will become commoditized and its differentiation will be determined by the way it interacts...

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Excellent observation. Keeping this in mind will create very loyal customers. This is an older article, but still very essential for any kind of business.

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