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Creating your Unique Value Proposition to gain your Competitive Edge.
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How to run better Marketing Experiments as a Growth Strategy

How to run better Marketing Experiments as a Growth Strategy | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it
How to run better Marketing Experiments to grow your business, using a Repeatable Growth Strategy to test and iterate for continuous improvement and...

Recently we were working with some clients, helping them look at their growth using marketing analytics. They all had revenue, and wanted to grow faster. They knew they could do better but needed help with these questions:

  • "where do I start?"
  • "what tactics should I use?"
  • "how should I measure my progress?"
  • "where should I focus?"

Maybe that seems familiar to you?

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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Studying the process of marketing and finding the best ways to get results!

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The Inbound Growth Hacking Bible

The Inbound Growth Hacking Bible | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

As a term, growth hacking has been around since 2010, when Sean Ellis of Dropbox fame bemoaned the fact that he cannot easily find a suitable successor when he moves on from a project since there was no way to succinctly formulate the requirements of the job. However, as a practice, growth hacking has been around for much longer than that, usually performed by creative marketers or business owners who were dedicated to growth beyond anything else and who had the skills and daring to think outside of what generally constitutes out of the box thinking, so yeah, out of the out of the box thinking. If, somehow, this isn’t enough of an explanation of what growth hacking actually entails, how it is different from marketing, and what are the skills that you need to become a successful growth hacker, do read on.

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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Growth Hacking explained.

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VC Chamath Palihapitiya Says He Has Cracked the Code for Making Startups Grow

VC Chamath Palihapitiya Says He Has Cracked the Code for Making Startups Grow | Competitive Edge | Scoop.it

All startups want growth. They want more eyeballs, more traction, more signs that what they are doing is working. They worship at the foot of the mythical hockey stick graph. But growth is a fickle, unpredictable thing — sometimes great products die before reaching an audience. Sometimes companies find tricks to get tons of users, but after the tricks fade away, everybody leaves. You can’t count on growth.

Not according to Chamath Palihapitiya. The venture capitalist, whose claim to fame was starting the growth team at Facebook, said his Social+Capital Partnership now has a crew of growth experts that it deploys to portfolio companies. And he claims they can make just about anything grow. Read more: clcik title or image.



Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Most interesting are the comments under this article, like this one from Chris Neumann:

What other companies other than Remind 101 has this worked for?  Seems like this is just centered on Remind 101.

IMO, the "code" to "crack" is to figure out which people are getting the most value from your product and orient your marketing around meeting their needs.  Then, figure out which acquisition channels work best, and optimize those channels.  Just be data driven in every step, and you'll grow.  I do this for multiple companies on a consulting basis, and just getting the company to become data driven in their decision making is often very very difficult.  It's also hard to instrument things and collect the data in the first place, so that's why most companies aren't data driven.  In short, figure out what's working and do more of that.  Figuring out what's working is hard.


or this one from Raymond Duke:

There are a set of principles that you can use to grow a product or service. They've been used since a cavemen traded tiger meat for a new cave, to companies been sold for 1 billion dollars. Be wary of those who claim to have developed something "new" - because they are manipulating you. "Cracking the code" or using terms like "growth hacking"  is just like rotating an unbroken wheel.

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