Community Resilience
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How can resilience influence gentrification for creating sustainable urban systems?

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Ecology and Society: An integrated framework for sustainable development goals

Griggs, D., M. Stafford Smith, J. Rockström, M. C. Öhman, O. Gaffney, G. Glaser, N. Kanie, I. Noble, W. Steffen, and P. Shyamsundar. 2014. An integrated framework for sustainable development goals. Ecology and Society 19(4): 49.http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-07082-190449
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Sustainability lies in our ability to understand the collective intelligence of complex systems and how it can lead us toward a better state. 

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5 Ways Resilient People Use Failure To Their Advantage

5 Ways Resilient People Use Failure To Their Advantage | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
While some people become frozen with fear or immobilized by their emotions, resilient people have a remarkable ability to use failure as an opportunity to become better.

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Lauran Star's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:20 AM

My favorite is #5 -knowing your vulnerability - this is a must read for all

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Elasticity, Resilience, Antifragility in CoLlective and Individual Objects and Systems: The Challenges of Community Resilience

Elasticity, Resilience, Antifragility in CoLlective and Individual Objects and Systems: The Challenges of Community Resilience | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
“Community resilience is a measure of the sustained ability of a community to utilize available resources to respond to, withstand, and recover from adverse situations. […] Resilient communities withstand and recover from disasters. They also learn from past disasters to strengthen future recovery efforts. The Resilience in Action website offers toolkits, training, multimedia, newsletters, and other resources to help communities build and strengthen their resilience.”

 


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Truth and Trust: Maturana and Von Foerster

The first of a series of three 30 minute videos produced by the American Society for Cybernetics and Change Management Systems, directed by Pille Bunnell, 19...

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FastTFriend's curator insight, March 8, 2013 11:56 AM

This one is about Science and Reality.

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Control Profiles of Complex Networks

Studying the control properties of complex networks provides insight into how designers and engineers can influence these systems to achieve a desired behavior. Topology of a network has been shown to strongly correlate with certain control properties; here we uncover the fundamental structures that explain the basis of this correlation. We develop the control profile, a statistic that quantifies the different proportions of control-inducing structures present in a network. We find that standard random network models do not reproduce the kinds of control profiles that are observed in real-world networks. The profiles of real networks form three well-defined clusters that provide insight into the high-level organization and function of complex systems.

 

Control Profiles of Complex Networks
Justin Ruths, Derek Ruths

Science 21 March 2014:
Vol. 343 no. 6177 pp. 1373-1376
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1242063


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Agent_Zero: Toward Neurocognitive Foundations for Generative Social Science by Joshua M. Epstein

The Final Volume of the Groundbreaking Trilogy on Agent-Based Modeling
In this pioneering synthesis, Joshua Epstein introduces a new theoretical entity: Agent_Zero. This software individual, or "agent," is endowed with distinct emotional/affective, cognitive/deliberative, and social modules. Grounded in contemporary neuroscience, these internal components interact to generate observed, often far-from-rational, individual behavior. When multiple agents of this new type move and interact spatially, they collectively generate an astonishing range of dynamics spanning the fields of social conflict, psychology, public health, law, network science, and economics.
Epstein weaves a computational tapestry with threads from Plato, Hume, Darwin, Pavlov, Smith, Tolstoy, Marx, James, and Dostoevsky, among others. This transformative synthesis of social philosophy, cognitive neuroscience, and agent-based modeling will fascinate scholars and students of every stripe. Epstein's computer programs are provided in the book or on its Princeton University Press website, along with movies of his "computational parables."
Agent_Zero is a signal departure in what it includes (e.g., a new synthesis of neurally grounded internal modules), what it eschews (e.g., standard behavioral imitation), the phenomena it generates (from genocide to financial panic), and the modeling arsenal it offers the scientific community.
For generative social science, Agent_Zero presents a groundbreaking vision and the tools to realize it.


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Better Risk Management Can Unlock Opportunities, Prevent Crises, and Protect Poor amidst Disasters and Shocks | World Bank

In the face of social unrest, economic crises, and more frequent natural disasters, preparation and recovery efforts by governments, communities, and individuals have become increasingly essential. Effective risk management can provide both resilience to withstand adverse events and the ability to take advantage of development opportunities. It is, therefore, a critical ingredient in the fight to end poverty... 

 

Adverse shocks – above all health, weather shocks, and economic crises – play a major role in pushing households below the poverty line and keeping them there... managing risks responsibly and effectively can save lives, avert economic damages, prevent development setbacks, and unleash opportunities. Risk management can be a powerful instrument for development, bringing security and the means of progress to people in developing countries and beyond... 

 

Rather than rejecting change in order to avoid risk, people and institutions need to prepare for the opportunities and risks that accompany change... proactive, systematic, and integrated risk management efforts are needed more than ever. 

 

“We’re advocating a sea change in the way risk is managed,” says World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. “Our new approach calls for individuals and institutions to shift from being ‘crisis fighters’ to proactive and systematic risk managers. Doing so will help build resilience, protect hard-won development gains, and move us closer to achieving the World Bank Group’s goals of ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity.” ... 

 

The benefits from preparing for risk can significantly outweigh the costs. For example, mineral supplements designed to reduce malnutrition may yield benefits 15 times greater than the costs... Preparation induces people to be less risk averse. For instance, having access to rainfall insurance can induce farmers to invest in fertilizer, seeds, and other inputs, instead of simply stashing money in a mattress as a cushion for when the next dry spell comes.

 

Some risks have fallen dramatically in recent years. Life expectancy, for example, has risen thanks to expanded immunization, better safety nets, and improved forecasting of cyclones, tsunamis, and quakes. Moreover, most developing countries undertook reforms over the last decade that helped them build greater resilience to swings in global capital flows. This improved resilience helped countries maintain growth and poverty reduction during the recent global financial crisis... 

 

Human decision-making falters most where risk is involved – for this reason, risk creates special challenges for development policy. As globalized nations contend with fluctuations between good and bad outcomes, there is at times a propensity to shy away from development and globalization, when in fact doing so is to opt for the bad outcome in perpetuity.” ... 

 

Because most individuals remain ill-equipped to confront many shocks, they must depend on shared action and responsibility at different levels of society. Households provide support, pool resources, protect members, and invest in their future. Communities provide informal networks of insurance and pool resources to confront common risks. Enterprises provide employment and income, and foster innovation and productivity. The financial system offers risk management tools such as savings, insurance and credit. The state manages large systemic risks, provides an enabling environment, and supports the vulnerable. And the international community offers expertise, facilitates policy coordination, and pools global resources.

 

As WDR Director Norman Loayza points out, “Although people’s own efforts, initiative, and responsibility are essential to manage risk, their success –in terms of resilience and prosperity – will be limited without a supportive environment.”

 

Effective risk management consists of combining the capacity to prepare for risk with the ability to cope afterwards, while pitting the upfront cost of preparation against the probable benefit, according to the report. A strong risk management strategy consists of four components: knowledge, protection, insurance, and coping... 

 

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/10/06/better-risk-management-unlock-opportunities-prevent-crises-protect-poor-amidst-disasters-shocks


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How Small Business Leaders Can Build Resilience

How Small Business Leaders Can Build Resilience | Community Resilience | Scoop.it

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santina kerslake's curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:38 AM

The 4 tips are sound advice.

Tiffany Crosby's curator insight, October 23, 2013 2:26 PM

How resilient are you? Being a small business owner is hard but rewarding work. With the right attitude and proper support structure, you can make a go at it. 

Ciara Turner's curator insight, October 24, 2013 12:29 PM

 

Small business owners will always feel like they have a lot to prove as well a lot to lose. Especially, for the majority of the business owners that life has been devoted to keeping their business afloat. They have invested too much of their time money and effort into their business. According to the article it stress that a business owner MUST have resilience as a leader. They must be able to take on any obstacle that comes their way.

 

With the understanding that they still-fragile economic recovery, the difficulties small businesses face securing funding, and the importance of finding and retaining the right employees, places enormous stress on leaders today. Which is understandable however the business world does not wait on anyone? The competitors feast off of those that show weakness. By developing a true resilient mindset, small business owners can continue growing their business regardless of the obstacles around them.

 

In the article it gave a couple of tips on how to improve business owner’s resilience mindsets. It was four steps; don’t go it alone, accept people help, keep your eye on the goal, maintain a positive outlook.

 

Reach out to other trusted business owner or consultants for ideas and support. Small Business owners need to realize they are not in it alone. Once you have reached out the next step will accept the help that is being offered. It is not a sign of weakness. Business owners should keep their eye and mind on why they started this company to reinsurance themselves when time gets hard. Which can help them keep a positive outlook on any situation that comes up to sufface.  

 

With that being said I think that smaller business should engaged more into the Chapter 9 topic business to business relations. Which chapter touches on a couple key points for this particular article the fact of building and maintaining a relationship with other local businesses. On page 194 in the chapter someone suggested and I quote , " one-one-one discussions, partner advisory councils, surveys, and collaboration. the idea is to understand their issues and help partners grow."   Having an understanding that it is a competition however what a competition is if you have no one to compete with.

 

From a PR stand point I think that having that open minded mind set and such with only help you and your community thrive for better prosperity.

 

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The Urban Resilience Daily

The Urban Resilience Daily | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
The Urban Resilience Daily, by Urban Resilience: updated automatically with a curated selection of articles, blog posts, videos and photos.
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How To Live In The Moment And Get Work Done At The Same Time

How To Live In The Moment And Get Work Done At The Same Time | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
Clearing your mind and living in the moment isn't about putting productivity on hold. You can be more profitable with less brain clutter.

 

A stretched-thin, stressed-out workplace is not the workplace of the future. It falls on business managers to change this culture and promote focus and compassion--a concept making the rounds in workplace circles known as “mindfulness.” This is the technique of tuning out the noise and focusing deliberately on what is important.

 

Studies have found that mindfulness at work can increase engagement, productivity, innovation, and measurable business results.

 

Focus, well-being, happiness, and compassion are skills that complement executive behaviors and can be learned, practiced, and mastered.


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The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society

The World after Big Data: Building the Self-Regulating Society. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich.

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Beyond Resilience, Building Anti-Fragile Organizations, REVELN

  

It is about resilience? Or is it about learning how to be Anti-Fragile, a term coined by Nassim Taleb to describe natural or organic systems, things that need some dose of disorder in order to develop.


For example, deprive your bones of stress and they become brittle. Are our HR and organizational system destined to decline, are exist in a mediocre state due to their structure? 


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 14, 2013 10:40 AM

This is my own slide share for a recent presentation on change, adapting using both Nassim N. Taleb's "Anti-Fragile" concepts and Adam Grant's work on Givers, Matchers and Takers.   The full blog post here here:


Thanks for visiting.  I'm curious on what you think of these combinations of concepts.  Comments welcome!  ~  Deb

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Management Cybernetics - ToolsHero

Management Cybernetics - ToolsHero | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
Management cybernetics is the area of cybernetics that is concerns itself with management and organizations. The concept of ‘cybernetics’ was first introduced by Stafford Beer in the 1950s.

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Predicting Successful Memes using Network and Community Structure

Predicting Successful Memes using Network and Community Structure | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
We investigate the predictability of successful memes using their early spreading patterns in the underlying social networks. We propose and analyze a comprehensive set of features and develop an accurate model to predict future popularity of a meme given its early spreading patterns. Our paper provides the first comprehensive comparison of existing predictive frameworks. We categorize our features into three groups: influence of early adopters, community concentration, and characteristics of adoption time series. We find that features based on community structure are the most powerful predictors of future success. We also find that early popularity of a meme is not a good predictor of its future popularity, contrary to common belief. Our methods outperform other approaches, particularly in the task of detecting very popular or unpopular memes.
-- To be presented at ICWSM 2014
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Vulnerability and Poverty: Can we actually measure resilience? | IDS

Resilience as a new paradigm: There is little doubt that resilience is now part of the post 2015 development discourse. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) but also the UK Department for International Development (DFID), the Canadian International Development Research Center (IDRC), the European Union, the World Food Programmes (WFP) or even the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) are some of the many bi- and multi-lateral agencies which have recently embraced the resilience agenda. In parallel – or perhaps slightly pre-empting this general move –, a growing number of non-governmental organizations... have also adopted resilience as one of their new programmatic pillars. In these conditions no wonder that resilience will be one of the key topics put forward in both the 2014 World Development Report and the 2014 Human Development Report. 

 

Yet we are still not sure what resilience is exactly: Some would probably see the fact that resilience is becoming the new development paradigm as a possible paradox, in the sense that no one (so far) has actually managed to propose a definition that enjoys a general consensus.  How can a concept become a paradigm while it is still not properly defined? ...

 

Poverty or even vulnerability are certainly two other examples for which many different and sometimes conflicting definitions exist in the literature. This did not prevent them from becoming central elements in the past and recent development discourse. There are however at least two major difference between the case of poverty as a driving paradigm for development, and that of resilience.


First: poverty is something we try to avoid, or to reduce... Second: poverty has (at least in the past) benefited from some degree of consensus around the way it can be measured/monitored. Even if the concept of income poverty and its Foster-Greer-Thorbecke metric have been continuously criticized for being too simplistic and mono-dimensional, some would certainly argue that this mono-dimensional nature is actually a strength when it comes to measure poverty... 

 

An urgent need to be able to monitor resilience: For resilience, however, such mono-dimensional indicator does not exist, or at least not yet. The question which one may then ask is: are we likely to see emerging in the near future an ‘universal’ indicator of resilience?  If we let our pragmatism lead the reasoning, this eventuality might not be such a bad idea. Since so many agencies and NGOs are now claiming that the objective of their development programmes and interventions is to ‘strengthen the resilience of the poor and vulnerable’, it will soon become urgent to make these agencies and NGOs accountable for the money they are spending and more importantly for the ‘experiments’ they are implementing on households and communities in the name of resilience... 

 

There is therefore a need to agree on some form of resilience measurement or indicators, and this is with no doubt one of the reasons the FAO and the WFP recently set up a ‘Resilience Measurement Technical Working Group’ under the Food Security Information Network (FSIN). : In their introductory declaration the Working Group note: “Given the relatively recent emergence of the concept of resilience within the wider development community, there is an understandable scarcity of robust, verifiable evidence of the impact of programmes seeking to build resilience”...  

 

This need to identify the ways of measuring resilience is also the motivation of a recent working paper “Towardsa quantifiable measure of resilience” published by IDS. The main objective of the paper is to propose a new framework that addresses some of the concerns and limitations of resilience measurement as identified in that literature. In doing so it also identifies a series of key-principles which, the paper argues, are critical to build an appropriate measure of resilience. These key-principles are:

- Multi-scale... 

- Multi-dimension...

- Objective and subjective... 

- Generic... 

- Independently built...

 

The objective of the paper is twofold. First it illustrates and discusses some of the challenges related to the measurement of resilience by reviewing some of the most recently published and grey literature on resilience in relation to food security. Second it proposes a new framework that addresses some of the concerns and limitations of resilience measurement identified in that literature. 

 

The main postulate of this framework is that the ‘costs of resilience’ (that is, the different ex-ante and ex-post investments, losses, sacrifices, and costs that people have to undertake at individual and collective levels to ‘go through’ a shock or an adverse event) provide an appropriate  and independent metric to measure resilience across scales and dimensions... 

 

http://vulnerabilityandpoverty.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/can-we-actually-measure-resilience.html


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With an Eye Toward the Future: Building Resilience in a Changing World

With an Eye Toward the Future: Building Resilience in a Changing World | Community Resilience | Scoop.it
Typhoon Haiyan, the Category 5 super storm that devastated parts of the Philippines and killed thousands late last year, continues to remind us, tragically, of how vulnerable we are to weather-related disasters.
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