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"13 Steps for Long Term Culture Change"

Communities that follow most or all of these 13 Steps can create, and/or contribute to, many positive multiplier effects--and assist with accelerating solution-oriented activity at this most critical time. I urge readers of this message to make use of this “13 Step” resource.
Stefan Pasti's insight:
The Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative (www.cpcsi.org ) provides research and analysis for critical challenge alerts, and research and support for collaborative problem solving and community education initiatives which seek to maximize citizen participation, and accelerate solution-oriented activity.

 The “13 Steps for Long Term Culture Change” paper (78 pages; May, 2017) being introduced here is the second Summary Paper from The Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative. The first CPCS Initiative Summary Paper was “Recalibrating Our Moral Compasses: to resolve unprecedented challenges and discover our collective spiritual destiny” (85 pages; June, 2015, updated July, 2016). Both of these documents are accessible from the homepage of the CPCS Initiative, at www.cpcsi.org .

The “13 Step…” paper--

 A. --has an 8 page introduction which includes the following sections:

 In that “Convergence of Critical Challenges Alert”
The “Convergence of Critical Challenges”
Unprecedented Challenges + Serious Blind Spots + Most Complex Cultural Landscapes Ever Created on Earth = “Way Beyond” Uncharted Territory
The Four Part “Constellation of Initiatives” Approach in the CPCS Initiative Summary Paper
The Down-To-Earth Practical Value of Wisdom
All the “little events” in everyday community life can have a positive and cumulative effect
Surely, there will be work to do….;

 B. --provides an overview of the following 13 steps

1. “Community Good News Networks”
2. “Community Faith Mentoring Networks”
3. “Spiritual Friendships”
4. “Interfaith Peace Vigils”
5. “Recalibrating Our Moral Compasses (ROMC) Surveys”
6. “Community Visioning Initiatives”
7. “Neighborhood Learning Centers”
8. “Spiritually Responsible Investing”
9. “Ecological Sustainability/Permaculture/Ecovillages”
10. “Appropriate Technology”
11. “Food Sovereignty/Food Waste/Local Food Councils/Community Supported Agriculture”
12. “Local Currency”
13. “Neighbor to Neighbor Community Education (NTNCE) Projects”

 [Special Note: In addition to the overviews of the 13 Steps, a summary statement, three related fields of activity [from a list of “125 Related Fields of Activity” (also at the CPCS Initiative webpage for archived IPCR Initiative documents at https://www.cpcsi.org/about-the-ipcr-initiative.html )] and one sample question (from various IPCR and CPCS documents) are included with each step, as examples of starting points for workshop discussion.]

 C. --has an appendix which includes a 2 page challenge assessment (“Unprecedented Challenges Ahead—February 2017”), and a 4 page piece titled “30 Propositions and Premises which make up the Foundation of The CPCS Initiative”
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Chattanooga: Community With A Vision

13 minute documentary of two Community Visioning Initiatives in Chattanooga, Tennessee (US)

Stefan Pasti's insight:

This writer’s interest in Community Visioning Initiatives was inspired instantly when, in 1994, he watched a documentary titled "Chattanooga:  Community with a Vision" (13 minutes). The video documents two very successful Community Visioning Initiatives organized by the non-profit organization Chattanooga Venture (Chattanooga, Tennessee USA)—one in 1984, and a follow-up in 1993.  The 1984 Chattanooga Community Visioning Project (“Vision 2000”), attracted more than 1,700 participants, and produced 40 community goals—which resulted in the implementation of 223 projects and programs, the creation of 1,300 permanent jobs, and a total financial investment of 793 million dollars.

 

This writer advocates for a combination of preliminary surveys to 150 local leaders (as preparation for Community Visioning Initiatives), time-intensive Community Visioning Initiatives supported by many

“Community Teaching and Learning Centers” (offering workshops suggested by the preliminary surveys), and “sister community” relationships as a starting point for accelerating solution-oriented activity, and creating more “close-knit” communities…communities with a healthy appreciation for each others strengths, communities with a well-developed capacity to resolve even the most difficult challenges—and communities which demonstrate a high level of compassion for their fellow human beings.

 

[Note:  New document from the Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative:  "Invitation Package for Possible Board of Advisors (at www.cpcsc.info )"  (589 pages; 3.65 MB) (accessible at http://cpcsc.info/invitation-package/&nbsp . ; Much discussion of Community Visioning Initiatives (and other supporting parts of such a collaborative problem solving and citizen peacebuilding process) in Sedtion VII.  A Constellation of Initiatives Approach to Collaborative Problem Solving and Citizen Peacebuilding of the "Invitation Package" document.]

 

Stefan Pasti

Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainbility (CPCS) Initiative

www.cpcsc.info 

 

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Can We Afford 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives?

Here are some observations on how 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives might be funded…

Stefan Pasti's insight:

The “Invitation Package for Possible Board of Advisors (at www.cpcsc.info )” (589 pages) (accessible at http://cpcsc.info/invitation-package/ ) is an invitation to the 272 people listed in Section III “List of People Being Formally Invited to Join CPCS Initiative Board of Advisors”—and to citizens from every variety of circumstances who might read this—

 

to help create, become involved, contribute to, and participate in

 

a)  one or more of the thousands of Community Visioning Initiatives (or some similar stakeholder engagement/collaborative problem solving process designed to maximize citizen participation) needed to overcome the challenges of our times
 

 

Here are some observations on how 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives might be funded…

 

A rough estimate by this writer for a time-intensive (year or more) Community Visioning Initiative (introduced by Preliminary Surveys, and supported by many Community Teaching and Learning Centers) is  $10 million (10 million in U.S. dollars).

 

Thus, 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives, in communities around the world, would cost $10 billion.

 

Some selected observations on where that $10 billion could come from—

 

1)  $10 billion is only .005% of the $207 trillion in personal wealth held by the richest 10 percent.

 

2)  $10 billion is .07% of the $14 trillion of “stranded carbon assets” on the books of publicly listed companies, private companies, state governments and sovereign wealth funds.

 

3)  $10 billion is only .57% (a little more than half of 1%) of $1,750 billion in military expenditures in 2012.

 

4)  $10 billion is 1.8% of (est.) $557 billion in worldwide advertising spending  in 2012.

 

5)  $10 billion is 2.4% of the $419 billion of worldwide gambling revenues in 2011.

 

6)  $10 billion is 6% of the $162 billion people in the United States spent on beer, wine, and liquor in 2011.

 

7)  If 18% of cable TV subscribers in the United States unsubscribed from cable TV, they could re-direct that money to finance 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives.

 

8)  Companies marketing cigarettes in the United States could use that $10 billion per year to fund the costs of implementing 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives.

 

9)  “Many hands make much work light.”—The result can be that there are countless “ways to earn a living” which contribute to the peacebuilding, community revitalization, and ecological sustainability efforts necessary to overcome the challenges of our times.

 

 

[Note:  New document from the Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative:  "Invitation Package for Possible Board of Advisors (at www.cpcsc.info )"  (589 pages; 3.65 MB) (accessible at http://cpcsc.info/invitation-package/   The “Invitation Package” document includes the above observations about affording 1000 Community Visioning Initiatives in Section VII.  “A Constellation of Initiatives Approach to Collaborative Problem Solving and Citizen Peacebuilding”  (see “Cost of Community Visioning Initiatives” (p.502)(which also includes the source references for the observations)—and in Appendix 7 “We have the resources to overcome the challenges of our times.” (p.583)]

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"Unprecedented Challenges Ahead--February 2017"

A 2 page overview of the ten most critical challenges identified by this writer
Stefan Pasti's insight:
The Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative (www.cpcsi.org ) provides research and analysis for critical challenge alerts, and research and support for collaborative problem solving and community education initiatives which seek to maximize citizen participation, and accelerate solution-oriented activity.

The cultural transformation necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and mitigate global warming is, by itself, enough to justify the highest level of warning since:

a) there is uncertainty about how negative feedback loops are triggered
b) there is a quickly closing window of opportunity for staying below +2oC (+3.6oF)
c) investment in the energy sector requires long-range planning
d) although there is much very credible information available--about what causes global warming and climate change, how widespread the negative impacts are already, how catastrophic negative impacts could be in the future, and what we can do to reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions and minimize negative impacts--we live in very complex cultural landscapes, and there are many different kinds of moral compasses attempting to navigate such landscapes.

Unfortunately, what we have now is a convergence of critical challenges.  This writer's two page overview of ten critical challenges we now face ("Unprecedented Challenges Ahead--February 2017") is accessible from the homepage of www.cpcsi.org

The ten most critical challenges identified by this writer:

1) Global warming and reducing carbon emissions
2) A marginalization of the treasured wisdom associated with religious, spiritual, and moral traditions
3) Cultures of violence, greed, corruption, and overindulgence
4) The end of the Fossil Fuel Era
5) The increasing world population and its implications relating to widespread resource depletion
6) Current trends indicate that we are creating more and more “urban agglomerations”--(megacities with a population of more than 1 million people--more than 400)—and almost all megacities are running massive “ecological deficits”
7) Global inequities and the tragic cycles of malnutrition, disease, and death
8) Significant progress towards positive tipping points for the other challenges cited in this list will almost certainly make it impossible for the U.S., and many other countries, to resolve unprecedented public debt
9) Deterioration of trust/confidence in institutions responsible for guiding public discourse—and the related loss of social and spiritual cohesion
10) Sorting out what are real challenges and what are sound and practical solutions is becoming more and more difficult—People who are not sufficiently informed about critical issues are everywhere, and they are investing their time, energy, and money—voting—all the time.


The Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative (www.cpcsi.org ) provides research and analysis for critical challenge alerts, and research and support for collaborative problem solving and community education initiatives which seek to maximize citizen participation, and accelerate solution-oriented activity.

Readers are encouraged to access the CPCS Initiative document "13 Steps for Long Term Culture Change" (from the www.cpcsi.org homepage).  This “13 Step” document can create, and/or contribute to, many positive multiplier effects--and assist with accelerating solution-oriented activity at this most critical time.


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Gaia Education Design for Sustainability - Incorporating Transition Towns Training

Gaia Education Design for Sustainability - Incorporating Transition Towns Training | Community Peacebuilding | Scoop.it
Gaia Education Design for Sustainability - Incorporating Transition Towns Training
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“Gaia Education Design for Sustainability Incorporating Transition Towns Training

5 October - 8 November 2013

 

[The following notes are from the above webpage]

 

“Presented by the Findhorn Foundation College in partnership with the Findhorn Foundation, Global Ecovillage Network and Gaia Education

 

“Based on the Ecovillage Design Curriculum - an official contribution to the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development

 

 

“You are invited to join this five-week comprehensive training based on the four core pillars of the Ecovillage Design Curriculum: the social, worldview, ecological and economic dimensions of sustainability.

 

“The Gaia Education curriculum draws on the experience and expertise developed in a network of some of the most successful ecovillages and community projects across the Earth.

 

“Design for Sustainability Training is an advanced training course based at the Findhorn Ecovillage providing a practical forum for learning and developing skills needed to work effectively with design for sustainability at all levels. The fifth week of the programme offers practice in facilitation skills, for personal growth, spiritual enrichment and sustainable social action.

 

“Facilitated by 

May East -  Chief Executive, Gaia Education
Jonathan Dawson - Head of Economics, Schumacher College 
Michael Shaw - Director, Ecovillage International
Pracha Hutanuwatr - Director, Right Livelihood Foundation, Thailand
Jane Rasbash - Director, Gaia Education
Daniel Wahl - Research & Innovation, International Futures Forum
and Findhorn Ecovillage experts

 
 

“Social Design - Week 1: Oct 5 - Oct 11

 

Topics include

 

Building Community & Embracing Diversity

Communication Skills and Feedback

Facilitation and Decision-Making Processes

Conflict Facilitation

Personal Empowerment and Leadership

Celebrating Life: Creativity and Art

 

 

“Ecological Design - Week 2: Oct 12 - Oct 18

 

Topics include

 

Whole Systems Approach to Ecological Design & Bioregionalism

Water

Organic Agriculture and Local Food

Appropriate Technology: Energy

Green Building

 

 

“Economic Design - Week 3: Oct 19 - Oct 26

 

Topics include

 

Shifting the Global Economy to Sustainability

How Money Works: Community Banks and Currencies

Right Livelihood

Social Enterprise

Legal and Financial Issues

 

 

“Worldview - Week 4: Oct 26 - Nov 1

 

Topics include

 

Holistic Worldview

Listening to and Reconnecting with Nature

Awakening & Transformation of Consciousness

Personal Health, Planetary Health

Socially Engaged Spirituality and Bioregionalism

 

 

“Facilitation Skills and Empowerment - Week 5: Nov 2 - Nov 8

 

Topics include

 

Practice in facilitation skills for personal growth

Spiritual enrichment

Sustainable social action”

 

 

[Note:  New document from the Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative:  "Invitation Package for Possible Board of Advisors (at www.cpcsc.info )"  (589 pages; 3.65 MB) (accessible at http://cpcsc.info/invitation-package/ ;).  Gaia Education is one of the 29 Organizations featured in Section 

II. (of the "Invitation Package" document)--  Solution Oriented Pathways— A List (with descriptions) of 29 Organizations, Businesses, and Initiatives working towards resolving many of the challenges of our times.]

 

Stefan Pasti

Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative

www.cpcsc.info 

 

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Maximizing Employment During The Unprecedented Transition Ahead

Many hands make much work light.

Stefan Pasti's insight:

[Note:  The following is excerpted from the “Long Version Table of Contents” (27 pages) for the “Invitation Package for Possible Board of Advisors (at www.cpcsc.info )”.  There are more details provided in the complete “Invitation Package” document (see p. 480-489)]

 
 

E.  Maximizing Employment—Job Fairs, Employment Listings at CTLCs, Local Currency   (p.480)

 

Selected Entries

 

1)  Surely, there will be work to do….   (p. 480)

 

2)  Preliminary surveys in preparation for Community Visioning Initiatives, the actual implementation of Community Visioning Initiatives, and affordable and accessible education in support of Community Visioning Initiatives (at “Community Teaching and Learning Centers”) can result in apprenticeships, internships, volunteer opportunities, and training in key fields of activity—all of which would minimize “transformation unemployment”.   (p. 481)

 

3)  Summary Presentations and Job Fairs—Step 12 from the document “A 15 Step Outline for a Community Visioning Initiative” (also in Appendix 1)   (p.481)

The job fairs which come at the end of the CVI process provide opportunities for all key stakeholders in the community (businesses, organizations, institutions, government, etc.) to demonstrate their upgraded awareness—and their interest in the welfare of the community—by offering and facilitating new employment opportunities… and thus helping with a just transition from patterns of investment which in only limited ways represent solutions to prioritized challenges to patterns of investment which in many ways represent solutions to prioritized challenges.

 

 

 

One possible element of this just transition can be that people who do deliberately focus their investments of time, energy, and money towards solutions identified by the Community Visioning Initiative being carried out in their community may receive, as encouragement, local currency.  And then such local currency can, in its turn, be redeemed in ways which will be particularly helpful to people transitioning from less solution-oriented employment to more solution-oriented employment.

 

4)  The “1000 Community Visioning Initiative” Proposal—helping people to deliberately channel their time, energy, and money into the creation of “ways of earning a living” which are directly related to resolving high priority challenges

 

6)  Maximum citizen participation in identifying challenges and solution-oriented activity would generate investment, create training, and result in higher levels of employment—a virtuous cycle—and close the gaps on the challenges—solutions—training—employment sequence.   (p. 483)

 

7)  Responses (from the 150 key leaders surveyed before the visioning process begins—and by way of ongoing questionnaires, from residents) which will build consensus for action plans, and raise employment outlooks in specific fields of activity associated with those action plans.   (p. 484)

 

8)  Many people can realize the wisdom of deliberately focusing the way they spend their time, energy, and money.  The result can be a deliberate increase in the “ways of earning a living” which are directly related to overcoming the challenges identified by residents as priority challenges.  As the ancient Chinese proverb says: “Many hands make much work light.”   (p.486)

 

9)  One of the most persistent ironies in life is that with so many opportunities to provide real assistance to fellow human beings, there are still many, many people in this world who cannot find a “way to earn a living” providing such assistance… there is the potential—and the need—to overcome such ironies.    (p. 487)

11)  “Creating millions of new green jobs through targeted investment and spending is one thing; filling those jobs with qualified candidates is quite another thing.  This transition will require a massive job training (and retraining) effort on the part of business, government, and education if it is to scale up quickly.    (p. 488)

 

13)  The sharing of Community Visioning Initiative experiences and Community Teaching and Learning Center experiences through the clearinghouse websites would be a key (if we will use it) to making the most of learning experiences worldwide…

 

 

[Note:  New document from the Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative:  "Invitation Package for Possible Board of Advisors (at www.cpcsc.info )"  (589 pages; 3.65 MB) (accessible at http://cpcsc.info/invitation-package/ .  The CPCS Initiative in general, and the "Invitation Package" document in many ways (see Section VII.  p. 432-509), advocate for a combination of preliminary surveys to 150 local leaders (as preparation for Community Visioning Initiatives), time-intensive Community Visioning Initiatives supported by many “Community Teaching and Learning Centers” (offering workshops suggested by the preliminary surveys), and “sister community” relationships as a starting point for accelerating solution-oriented activity, and creating more “close-knit” communities…communities with a healthy appreciation for each others strengths, communities with a well-developed capacity to resolve even the most difficult challenges—and communities which demonstrate a high level of compassion for their fellow human beings.]

 

 

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