Communication and Technology (by Kevin)
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Communication and Technology (by Kevin)
Is communication and technology stealing our abilities to talk face-to-face?
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Communication and Technology in the Media

Communication and Technology in the Media | Communication and Technology (by Kevin) | Scoop.it

What stereotype is explored by this cartoon? Does the cartoonist agree or disagree with its value?

Disagree. It shows that texting is distracting them from whats ahead of them.

 

Is this a serious cartoon? Does Mark Knight really want you to believe his contention?

Yes, he wants us to see how technology is taking over our lives slowly.

 

What do you think that each of the characters is SMS-ing about? Who are they SMS ing?

They are SMS-ing each other. Probably talking about what plans they have for the rest of the day...

 

Look up the meaning of irony: how does this cartoon use irony?

The irony lies in the use of technology. The fact that they still need the help of mobile phones to communicate when they are right beside each other.

 

Look up the meaning of satire: what situation or story is this cartoon a satire of?

It is satire of teenagers these days being too addicted to their phones.

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Marshall McLuhan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Hot" and "cool" media
In the first part of Understanding Media, McLuhan also stated that different media invite different degrees of participation on the part of a person who chooses to consume a medium. Some media, like the movies, were "hot"—that is, they enhance one single sense, in this case vision, in such a manner that a person does not need to exert much effort in filling in the details of a movie image. McLuhan contrasted this with "cool" TV, which he claimed requires more effort on the part of the viewer to determine meaning, and comics, which due to their minimal presentation of visual detail require a high degree of effort to fill in details that the cartoonist may have intended to portray. A movie is thus said by McLuhan to be "hot", intensifying one single sense "high definition", demanding a viewer's attention, and a comic book to be "cool" and "low definition", requiring much more conscious participation by the reader to extract value.

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