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40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire | Literacy | Scoop.it
2000 years ago today, the Roman Emperor Augustus died. His reign marked the start of a 200-year period of peace and prosperity for the empire.
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What Works in Writing Instruction

What Works in Writing Instruction | Literacy | Scoop.it
Educator Leslie Laud says that evidence-based practices for teaching writing, including the use of formative-assessment techniques, can dramatically improve students' skills.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 31, 2013 2:10 AM

The importance of developing strong writing skills seems to be gaining more and more attention almost daily. Employers spend billions remediating writing skills. With the new SAT, college admissions hinge even more strongly on writing. The new generation of assessments associated with the Common Core State Standards will require students to show what they know via writing more so than previous high-stakes tests ever have. As social-media influence grows beyond merely chatting with peers to include outreach and professional communication, so does the importance of writing well. The list goes on.

What are the best ways to prepare students for the shifting landscape? In fact, evidence-based practices for teaching students how to write are clear, yet not widely implemented, according to a 2008 survey published in the Journal of Educational Psychology. In a study just published in the School Psychology Review, researchers Gary A. Trioa and Natalie G. Olinghouse summarize these essential evidence-based practices for teaching writing, including: daily writing practice, strategy instruction, self-regulation and meta-cognitive reflection (as in the Self-Regulated Strategy Developmentapproach), peer collaboration, and regular feedback through formative assessment. Unfortunately, the study concludes that most schools do not have sufficiently comprehensive, sustained, and focused systems for offering professional development to teachers to support such writing practices.

 
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Dictation Technology Will Change Writing Instruction

Dictation Technology Will Change Writing Instruction | Literacy | Scoop.it

If we look into the not-too-distant future, it appears that -- whether we like it or not -- dictation technologies will have effects on writing instruction. The time has come for us to decide exactly what kind of effects we intend for those to be.

 


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:48 AM

An interesting and very relevant article on the impact dictation software will have on the way we continue to develop writing skills.

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Are we confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction?

Are we confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction? | Literacy | Scoop.it
Testing and teaching are not the same thing. Some educators are blurring the lines.

 

"As a profession, we are confusing reading and writing instruction with assessment of that instruction. Many teachers strive, as I did, to insert “test-like” experiences within the context of their units to decrease the stand alone skills practice that high stakes testing often causes, but the truth is undeniable. We are increasingly blurring the lines between instruction (teaching and learning) and assessment of instruction (tests to measure teaching and learning)."


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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, November 8, 2013 11:55 PM

I so agree! Good points! Although schools must prepare students for taking assessments, assessment preparation and assessment results should not be mistaken for good teaching and/or actual student outcomes.

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 11, 2013 6:40 AM

If I'm reading this article correctly, the author does call into question elements of the Common Core Assessment's questionable "side affects" while at the same time not condemning the the intent of assessment.

 

The author's question raises the valid point that there is a difference between instruction and assessment of that instruction. If instruction becomes test prep then test prep becomes the perceived importance of the content. And, in the case of literary reading, the "side effects" of this lack of distinction between what ought to be central and what has become central is perhaps seriously misdirecting student attentiveness. 

 

In my mind, this does not mean that assessment is unimportant and therefore ought to be abandoned. It means that we should be mindful that the purposes for literary reading are not the same as the purposes for attempting to measure the achievement of benefit derived from literary reading. And, if we are mindful of the distinction, then, as was the case for promoting "formative assessment structures," perhaps current literary assessment structures can evolve in such ways as to be less intrusive and thereby less likely to misdirect classroom practices that are more likely to divert students' attentiveness and engagement away from  the actual value of literary reading  and more likely to capture evidence that students' recognize the reasoning behind the advise provided to those who spend time exploring the wisdoms articulated across time and cultures by history's wisest spokespersons. Perhaps assessment structures can continue to evolve to a point where students will demonstrate understanding beyond merely being able to merely identify WHAT the themes are in a piece of great literature,, but also be able to demonstrate an understanding of WHY those themes are worth his or her engaged and serious contemplation.

 

I hope that my take is not Panglossian optimism about the potential for further improvement of the current state of literary reading assessment, but rather the optimism of people such as Martin Luther King who perceived a problem long inadequately unaddressed yet continued to believe, in spite of history's significant evidence to the contrary, that good things could still  be done to more successfully address issues of serious concern.

 

Or maybe Atticus Finch was just an old fool. 

 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Jefferson Hall IV's curator insight, September 7, 2015 5:38 PM

Teaching and the evaluation of teaching need to be further separated nationally in the United States. In my elementary, middle, and high school experiences, there has been too much emphasis placed on the estimation on how much students our learning rather that of what we are learning. Specifically, I can recall teachers giving us there examples of what a proficient and advanced essay should entail and forcing us to regurgitate that form time and time again for the soul purpose of meeting state standards. This process does not promote learning, insight, or originality. It deprives students of the chance to actually learn how to formulate their own well written essay. The author of this article, Mary Rudd, exclaims teaching the “habits of mind” through reading and writing to promote efficient learning. Using reading and writing to instigate critical thinking is very poignant to the learning process. Mary Rudd and her long standing career in education validate her credibility of this article.

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Text Complexity: "The place to begin with is the student’s reading level.”

Text Complexity: "The place to begin with is the student’s reading level.” | Literacy | Scoop.it

In the past I myself embraced what Fountas and Pinnel called “a balanced literacy approach.”  Under this model classroom reading would be made up of the following components:

independent reading (at the student’s independent reading level)guided reading of a whole-group text (at median instructional reading level for class)teacher read aloud (slightly above median instructional level). 


The common core call for increased text complexity seems to fit well with the “guided reading” portion of the block.


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River Hill High School's curator insight, April 14, 2013 3:14 PM

A nice article that applies to any discipline, not just English!

Lenore Dufton-Johnstone's curator insight, July 11, 2013 9:22 PM

This is the model for my classroom reading program.

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Modeling Close Reading for Future Teachers

Modeling Close Reading for Future Teachers | Literacy | Scoop.it
In part one of this series, I shared how I use freely available video in my reading and literacy methods course to help my preservice teachers understand close reading instruction at a level that cou

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Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Graphicacy = Visual Literacy + Visual Thinking

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Graphicacy = Visual Literacy + Visual Thinking | Literacy | Scoop.it
Innovative design crosses over all aspects of education. The American Society for Innovation Design in Education, or ASIDE, seeks to infuse curriculum with new approaches to teaching and thinking.

Don't miss the presentation The 8 Hats of Data Visualisation by Andy Kirk.


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Fadhil's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:00 PM

"Doing data visualitation is less a technology problem, more to a people problem."

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Media Literacy: How to Close-Read Films and Videos | MiddleWeb

Media Literacy: How to Close-Read Films and Videos | MiddleWeb | Literacy | Scoop.it
When students close read a movie, they must learn how to deconstruct the story and also understand the techniques used by filmmakers to create the total effect.
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Ten Myths about Writing - Writing Rightly

Ten Myths about Writing - Writing Rightly | Literacy | Scoop.it

"One thing I've noticed since I became serious about writing is that there are a lot of supposedly universal truths about writers, writing, and the business of publishing."


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Penelope's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:56 PM

 

There are so many lists in the world of writing. Do this; don't do that. This one is a list of tenwith a few tongue-in-cheek's included. Read at the risk of laughter. We tend to need it after a long day of pecking away.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://writerunboxed.com/2014/01/14/ten-myths-about-writing/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+WriterUnboxed+%28Writer+Unboxed%29

 

 

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5 Habits of Innovative Educators

5 Habits of Innovative Educators | Literacy | Scoop.it
Habits are unconscious patterns of behavior that are acquired with frequent repetition. This post will look at what habits exist among innovative educators.
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5 Key Ways to Choose the Right Word (Without a Thesaurus!) - Helping Writers Become Authors

5 Key Ways to Choose the Right Word (Without a Thesaurus!) - Helping Writers Become Authors | Literacy | Scoop.it
Figuring out how to choose the right word is a crucial part of your writing that directly correlates with your readers' reaction to your content.

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Penelope's curator insight, January 17, 2014 8:00 PM

 

I'm finding you don't normally run into a word problem until you begin the editing process--then the trouble begins!

 

Sometimes the right word will just appear like manna from heaven--ah. So sweet. Other times? Your brain zips up tight and zip, nada, nothing.

 

This article is very timely for me as I am editing my first romance novel. Life dictated I put it away for a couple of months, and now some of the errors are glaring, others not so much.

 

Here are the 5 key ways to find that right word, but you'll have to click on over to the article for full details:

 

1. Identify Weak and Repetitive Phrases

2. Brainstorm Alternatives

3. Aim for an Emotional Response

4. Get Specific

5. Don’t Settle

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/11/5-key-ways-to-choose-the-right-word.html

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Use of Turnitin software does not deter cheating, study finds

Use of Turnitin software does not deter cheating, study finds | Literacy | Scoop.it
Students who are aware that their work will be checked by plagiarism-detection software are just as likely to cheat as those who are not, a study suggests.
Angie Miller's insight:

"Jonathan Bailey, founding editor of the Plagiarism Today website, said that plagiarism-detection tools work best 'when they aren't used as a mysterious plagiarism cop designed to play 'Gotcha' with plagiarists'.


'Instead, they need to be incorporated into plagiarism education and used as a tool to teach what plagiarism is, how to cite sources, when to cite and so on,' he said."



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Top 10 Inventions in History

Top 10 Inventions in History | Literacy | Scoop.it

What is the top 1 human invention of all time? It's "language" but why? Language is the definition of humanity.

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How today’s college students use Wikipedia for course-related research | Head | First Monday

How today’s college students use Wikipedia for course-related research | Head | First Monday | Literacy | Scoop.it
How today’s college students use Wikipedia for course-related research
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Writing Instruction & the Common Core

Writing Instruction & the Common Core | Literacy | Scoop.it

"First things first: Writers must read. Any instruction in writing must follow opportunities to read, read, read. No shortcuts." - Amy Benjamin


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"Non-Negotiable" Criteria for Alignment to #CommonCore

"Non-Negotiable" Criteria for Alignment to #CommonCore | Literacy | Scoop.it

The rubric for grades 3–12 includes four “non-negotiable” criteria—all of which had to be met to earn a Tier 1 or Tier 2 rating:

Text complexity: Materials had to fall within grade-level complexity bands, and texts needed to increase in complexity across grade bands.Text quality: The rubric requires that “Texts are of sufficient scope and quality to provide text-centered and integrated learning that is sequenced and scaffolded to advance students toward independent reading of grade level texts and build content knowledge (ELA, social studies, science and technical subjects, and the arts). The quality of texts is high—they support multiple readings for various purposes and exhibit exceptional craft and thought and/or provide useful information.”Foundational reading skills: “Materials provide instruction and diagnostic support in concepts of print, phonics, vocabulary, development, syntax, and fluency in a logical and transparent progression.”Text-dependent questions: “Text-dependent questions and tasks reflect the requirements of Reading Standard 1 by requiring use of textual evidence in support of meeting other grade-specific standards.”

These are important indicators of alignment and do clearly reflect the requirements of the Common Core literacy standards.


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Mark Gillingham's curator insight, March 25, 2014 4:20 PM

How do teachers ensure that texts continually rise in complexity? What is your strategy to reuse texts for various purposes (e.g., foundational skills, stretch texts)? How do you keep assignments broad enough to engage a range of reading ability? 

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#CommonCore Standards Drive New Approaches to Reading

#CommonCore Standards Drive New Approaches to Reading | Literacy | Scoop.it

Schools nationwide are revamping reading instruction, involving more disciplines and tilting toward nonfiction, among other changes.


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How will reading instruction change when aligned to the Common Core?

How will reading instruction change when aligned to the Common Core? | Literacy | Scoop.it

It is exactly this “close reading” that Common Core supporters hope will usher in a new era of reading instruction—one where teachers select grade-appropriate texts for all students; where they have students read and reread those texts—perhaps more times than even makes sense or feels comfortable—to support deep comprehension and analysis; and where they push students to engage in the text itself—in the author’s words, not in how those words make us feel.


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Linda Dougherty's curator insight, January 29, 2013 8:54 AM

Interesting thought-provoking article on reading instruction and the Common Core.

 

Mark Gillingham's curator insight, January 29, 2013 5:30 PM

Great Books Shared Inquiry shines at close reading. 

David A Wilson's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:18 PM

Good article

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ReadWriteThink: Teacher Resources

ReadWriteThink: Teacher Resources | Literacy | Scoop.it
Providing educators and students access to the highest quality practices and resources in reading and language arts instruction.

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Skills Practice | Creating ‘Character Recipes’

Skills Practice | Creating ‘Character Recipes’ | Literacy | Scoop.it
What "ingredients" might go into Lady Macbeth Soup? A pinch of paranoia and a pint of blood? In this writing prompt, students use recipes from The New York Times as templates for writing about characters in novels.

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Teaching essay writing

Teaching essay writing | Literacy | Scoop.it
Today I presented a seminar with ideas about teaching essay writing, with a particular focus on FCE and IELTS exam tasks. It's part of the monthly seminar series at International House Sevastopol. ...

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Do Your Students Know How To Search? - Edudemic

Do Your Students Know How To Search? - Edudemic | Literacy | Scoop.it
There is a new digital divide on the horizon. It is not based around who has devices and who does not, but instead the new digital divide will be based around students who know how to effectively find and curate information and those who do not.

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Helping Students Read Closely: When to Notice & Note

Helping Students Read Closely: When to Notice & Note | Literacy | Scoop.it
Close reading is one of the buzz words that is being emphasized with the Common Core Learning Standards. By close reading I am interpreting as the reading, rereading, and analysis of text for the p...

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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, January 11, 2014 9:11 AM

great suggestions via Kylene Beers/Chris Lehman..."notice & note"...#closereading

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11 Storyboarding Apps To Organize & Inspire Young Writers

11 Storyboarding Apps To Organize & Inspire Young Writers | Literacy | Scoop.it
11 Storyboarding Apps To Organize & Inspire Young Writers For students who dread writing class, a blank page can look a lot like a ten-foot monolith; an imposing, empty slate towering over their homework list....

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