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The Globemaker

"A short film about Peter Bellerby, artisan globemaker and founder of Bellerby and Co. Globemakers.  Directed by Charles Arran Busk & Jamie McGregor Smith."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 12, 2015 2:27 PM

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information--however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem.   If anybody want to get me a Christmas present, you know that I love cartographic gifts.     


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 13, 2015 8:26 AM

Un short film sobre Peter Bellerby, artesano fabricante de globos terráqueos y fundador de Bellerby and Co.Globemakers dirigida por Charles Arran Busk & Jamie McGregor Smith.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 13, 2015 11:57 PM

www.bharatemployment.com

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6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning - TeachThought

6 Types Of Assessment Of Learning - TeachThought | common core | Scoop.it
If curriculum is the what of teaching, and learning models are the how, assessment is the puzzled “Hmmmm”–as in, I assumed this and this about student learning, but after giving this assessment, well….”Hmmmmm.”

So what are the different types of assessment of learning? This graphic below from McGraw Hill offers up six forms; the next time someone says “assessment,’ you can say “Which type, and what are we doing with the data?” like the TeachThought educator you are.

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Creativity on the Run: 18 Apps that Support the Creative Process

Creativity on the Run: 18 Apps that Support the Creative Process | common core | Scoop.it

""The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." - Albert Einstein

 

We do not need to teach creativity, but rather inspire its daily practice. Somewhere along the way, we simply forgot to honor this innate gift and how to access its power. Our role as educators is to encourage learning experiences that increase the ability to recognize and listen to our inner voice."

 


Via John Evans
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Ruth Ersapah's curator insight, February 7, 2015 6:24 AM

Useful ideas for using apps for creativity.

Debbie Rogers's curator insight, February 7, 2015 10:01 AM

consider "teaching is what someone does to you - learning is what you do to yourself" the power of facilitating creative perspectives!

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iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » Fluency Finder: App

iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » Fluency Finder: App | common core | Scoop.it

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Argument Curation: An Effective Approach To Develop Critical Thinking Among Students

Argument Curation: An Effective Approach To Develop Critical Thinking Among Students | common core | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, October 3, 2013 5:48 PM

An excellent story for lecturers or teachers thinking in content curation as a tool in their aulas.

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, October 8, 2013 2:22 AM

Useful for educators - key digital literacy skill

johanna krijnsen's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:00 PM

content curation and critical thinking skills

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CCSS Reading: Informational Text

FCPS LAElementary is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you. (http://t.co/lMNqFTmv6u Check out our latest pins and our newly added boards!

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Sad But True: PowerPoint Doesn't Suck. You Do.

Sad But True: PowerPoint Doesn't Suck. You Do. | common core | Scoop.it
How many times have you heard the phrase, "PowerPoint sucks!" or "slides kill presentations?" Here's something to think about as you head into the weekend: PowerPoint doesn't suck. You suck. Sorry. I don't mean "you" (the person reading this blog...

Via Ken Morrison, Baiba Svenca
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Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, July 24, 2013 1:21 PM
I agree Andrew. Tools are tools and it's all about how you use them that counts.
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, July 24, 2013 1:23 PM
Good question Thomas! I think it is an ongoing dance between learning good storytelling and then learning the tools for maximum impact.
Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, August 2, 2013 7:44 AM

recentlyrue recently I had to get students to use Powerpoint as the Internet connection was too slow to have them all work at once on other online presentation tools. After laying down some ground rules about effective use they amazed us with their creative responses. It is not the tool. It is how you use it. And how teachers plan for it!

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ShaL i compR thee 2a summer's dai?

ShaL i compR thee 2a summer's dai? | common core | Scoop.it
Forget penning odes with a quill and parchment – predictive text is the poetry tool of the future according to Carol Ann Duffy, who believes "the poem is a form of texting ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 18, 2013 11:09 AM

Coincidence that I'm finding articles that take me to thoughts of hypocrisy? Dunno, but I'm intrigued by how many very interesting articles I'm finding on the Stylist.co.uK website. A site otherwise devoted to the depths of superficiality to which one can delve in the fashion world.

 

Okay. Maybe fashionista-living will lead one to complete safisfaction with how a life has been spent. I just can't quite get past the lemming-ness of it.

 

Nevertheless, there are quite freguently very intriguing literary articles to be found on the site.

 

This one is a bit on the light side, but I'd bet there'd be some great possibilities for engaged learning here. The article presents the original poems, many often taught in schools, followed by a "translation" into "TEXT SPEAK," the shortcut text that pretty much every cell-phone tethered teen is quite familiar with.

 

I had an interesting thought as I read through these poems and their "translations." My guess is that those of us less "proficient" at TEXT SPEAK might find  a sort of fingernails-on-the-chalkboard (assuming many of us actually remember the sound of fingernails on the chalkboard!) ear-pain as the beauty of the original poetry clashes with our sense of the ugliness of the TEXT SPEAK translation.

 

Yet, in a sense, we might be responding as TSSL (Text Speak as Second Language) speakers. It may be that the disconnect isn't there for native TEXT SPEAKers. I wonder if they might read the TEXT SPEAK version, not only not bothered by the disconnect, but not even noticing it AND thereby potentially as equally moved by the beauty of the poem's sentiments as we might be less capable of appreciating because we are bothered by "poor translation."

 

I taught Candide for decades. I don't speak French, but for the first 2.5 decades, I gave little attention to the quality of the English translation. But, somewhere in the third decade, when ordering replacement copies, the district ordered copies with a different translation. And, I was shocked at what I perceived as the ugliness of the new translation.

 

The translation I'd used for 2.5 decades began...

 

"In Westphalia, in the castle of My Lord the Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckj, there was a young man whom nature had endowed with the gentlest of characters. His face bespoke his soul. His judgment was rather sound and his mind of the simplist..."

 

I loved the phrasing...

"endowed with the gentlest of characters"

"His face bespoke his soul."

"his mind of the simplest"

 

It was so poetic.

 

BUT The new translation! Oh my! It began...

 

"In the country of Westphalia, in the castle of the most noble Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh, lived a youth whom Nature had endowed with a most sweet disposition. His face was the true index of his mind. He had a solid judgment joined to the most unaffected simplicity..." 

 

How dry. How it "didn't sing" to me. How disappointed I was.

 

And then there was the reverse case experience. I'd read Don Quixote (well okay the famous parts anyway) and found it hilarious and a quite wonderful read. Then several years later, a "new translation" by Edith Grossman was published. The translation was heralded as being magnificent. And, it was. It brought a pulse to the read that I had not missed in my previous readings. But recognized immediately when compared to the new translation.

 

My point? Perhaps we see a degradation in going from an original version of the poems in this article to the TEXT SPEAK versions and thereby do not or can not appreciate the "translation" as I was never quite able to appreciate the "new" translation of Candide. While at the same time our students who are more comfortable with TEXT SPEAK are in a position more similar to my experience with Don Quixote in that the quality of the poorer earlier translations did not hamper my appreciation of the story at all and perhaps never would have hampered my appreciation had I not chosen to reread the book in its newer and better translation.

 

What if a students is moved by reading...

 

how do i ♥ thee? lt me count d ways.

i ♥ thee2 d depth & breadth & h8t

my soul cn reach, wen fEln out of site

4 d ends of bn & ideal grace.

 

He or she might be as moved as we were when we first read...

 

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee to the depth and breadth and height

My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight

For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.

 

I dunno why, but I think it might be easier for a student who loved the TEXT SPEAK version to transition to the traditional version and thereby find even more to appreciate (as I did moving from old Don Quixote to new Don Quixote translation) than it was for me to move the other direction as was the case when I moved from old Candide to new Candide.

 

We might be wary of how we express our opinion about what our kids read and enjoy and by doing so miss a great opportunity to move their existing appreciation to even higher levels by sharing the "better" translation.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Close Reading + Visual Literacy=Pathways for Understanding

Close Reading + Visual Literacy=Pathways for Understanding | common core | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Katie Cunningham, from Manhattanville College, discusses how to incorporate visual close reading in a curriculum.

Via Mel Riddile
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Mara Ofengender's curator insight, June 27, 2013 12:15 PM

REading close is an important skill for any kind of reading but it will help analyze scripts.  

Karen Ford's comment, July 10, 2013 3:29 PM
this is a great article... and one that I'll have my grad & undergrad students read.
lbligen's curator insight, August 4, 2013 2:55 PM

Great strategies to help students any age with comprehension, resources,and lessons.

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Common Core State Standards Initiative | English Language Arts Standards | Home | English Language Arts Standards

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Why Map Projections Matter


Via Seth Dixon
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:27 AM

Would an inverted Peters projection "freak you out"?

Tiani Page's curator insight, April 27, 2015 11:51 PM

As part of geography education we are required to teach students about different map projections and the rationale for these. This little video puts it quite well. 

Adelaide Parkin's comment, September 7, 2016 8:52 PM
This is an engaging and funny clip! It is a great resource that could be used in a lessons introduction! for myself i love finding funny little clips that relate to a topic to play at the start of a lesson and then explain to the students what the topic is! Great resource i will be saving for later
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Teaching with Technology in the Middle: Teaching kids to curate

Teaching with Technology in the Middle: Teaching kids to curate | common core | Scoop.it
Quite a bit of what I read online are pieces that have been remixed and re-purposed. It’s content that has been taken from various places on the web, then collected and organized, or “curated,” by someone other than the original author of that content. It’s a form of composition that is definitely real-world, but until this year, it wasn't a format I had given much thought to inviting my students to write.


Asking student writers to curate, though, is a worthwhile venture.

Via John Evans
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Corkboard Connections: Literature Circles Made Easy - New Resources

Corkboard Connections: Literature Circles Made Easy - New Resources | common core | Scoop.it

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Close Reading of Picture Books

Close Reading of Picture Books | common core | Scoop.it
“If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.” ―     Oscar Wilde I am often inspired by the creativity and ingenuity of my children.  My nine-year-o...
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In the Wake of the ELA exam…Lessons from NYS - The Reading & Writing Project

In the Wake of the ELA exam…Lessons from NYS - The Reading & Writing Project | common core | Scoop.it
Interesting ideas...In the Wake of the ELA exam…Lessons from NYS - The Reading & Writing Project http://t.co/0xrmTWwT3D #ccss #commoncore

Via Darren Burris
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Infographic: The Socratic questioning process ...

Infographic: The Socratic questioning process ... | common core | Scoop.it

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Overarcher's curator insight, July 10, 2013 2:55 AM

socratic questioning in pictures, love it!

Maria Persson's comment, July 11, 2013 6:15 PM
My daily life at work and play so often involves Socratic questioning - I never get bored and constantly on a learning curve! Thanks for sharing this great resource!
Margarita Parra's comment, July 22, 2013 10:01 PM
There is an approach to solving a problem, by Guy Brousseau. It looks much like this process.And it works!
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Newsela - Build Reading Comprehension with News

Newsela - Build Reading Comprehension with News | common core | Scoop.it

Read closely. Think critically. Be worldly.


Via Beth Dichter
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Jackie Keith's curator insight, June 19, 2013 8:31 AM

Students can use it without registering by clicking "No Thanks" and can select different Lexile versions of the same article. 

John Scott Lucas's comment, June 20, 2013 5:26 AM
Looking forward to fall to experiment with this!
Chrissy Z's curator insight, September 22, 2017 12:47 PM
Reading comprehension for students who are English Learners
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Close Reading Resources via NC

Close Reading Resources via NC | common core | Scoop.it

NC CCSS ELA Close Reading Resources | Grade K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ,8 and Close Reading Passages, Close Reading Lessons Plans, Close Reading Graphic Organizes, and Close Reading NC CCSS ELA Posters 

North Carolina's ELA Common Core State Standards are being implemented fully this year! CCSS ELA testing starts 2014-15! Teachers, Administrators, Parents and Students need to prepare for the more rigorous CCSS ELA reading standards with careful examination and study of text demands. The Close Reading CCSS ELA resources below are great tools for teachers to use in the classroom to help students develop stronger reading comprehension strategies and skills.


Via Mel Riddile
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Planning Common Core Lessons?: Free, Web-based applications can help align your plans with the new standards - The Digital Shift

Planning Common Core Lessons?: Free, Web-based applications can help align your plans with the new standards - The Digital Shift | common core | Scoop.it
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Common Core State Standards Initiative | English Language Arts Standards | Home | English Language Arts Standards

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