Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Free PDF Download
Scoop.it!

The Beginners Guide To Preparing Healthy Comfort Food

The Beginners Guide To Preparing Healthy Comfort Food | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it

Book Description “The Beginners Guide To Preparing Healthy Comfort Food” is a text that not only gives the reader information on what comfort food is but also provides some great recipe options that can be used to see just how great comfort foods are. These recipes are a bit... http://www.ebookma.com/pdf/the-beginners-guide-to-preparing-healthy-comfort-food.html


Via eBookMA
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
Scoop.it!

Stress hormone receptors in taste buds 'may help explain emotional eating'

Stress hormone receptors in taste buds 'may help explain emotional eating' | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified stress hormone receptors in oral taste buds responsible for detecting sweet, savory and bitter tastes, which may help explain stress-related eating.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Healthcare and Technology news
Scoop.it!

7 ways to stop unhealthy food cravings

7 ways to stop unhealthy food cravings | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it

How often are you overcome with the desire to devour a chocolate bar or cheeseburger? Even the most nutrition-conscious people have to learn how to cope with cravings, sometimes for not-so-nutritious foods. You might think that a longing for these unhealthy treats results from emotions, and that could be true -- but not necessarily.

"Cravings are usually stimulated by emotional cues, but then fueled by physiological ones as we imagine what it would be like to eat the food we want to have," says Brian Wansink, Ph.D., professor at Cornell University and author of Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life. So to avoid mindless munching, you've got to determine the causes of your cravings and be set up with strategies to subdue them. Read on for tips to help you do just that.

DailyBurn: Low-calorie foods that will actually fill you up

 

How to break your addiction to food

 

Calorie Count at the Vending Machine

1. Ask whether you're hungry

It might seem simple, but people often neglect to determine their level of hunger before they start noshing. "Take a three-minute time-out and ask yourself, 'What do I want? How am I feeling?'" advises Caroline Cederquist, M.D., a Naples, Florida--based physician who specializes in weight management. "Identifying that there may be no actual hunger is the first step in not giving in to every craving." Keep in mind, though, that you very well could be starving and need to eat a full meal, says Wansink; if that's the case, try consuming a healthy dish and then reassessing your desire.

DailyBurn: 7 delicious protein smoothie recipes

2. Consider what your body needs

"All cravings are important because they give you clues to what you're feeling but also what's happening in your body biochemically and metabolically," says Cederquist. Some are a sign that your body needs more of certain nutrients. For instance, a strong taste for red meat could be a hint that you're low on iron.

A blood test can measure whether you need to load up on any vitamins or minerals in particular. These sort of cravings that suggest a nutrient deficiency generally only occur in cases of extreme deprivation or pregnancy, though, notes Cederquist.

DailyBurn: What 200 calories of nuts looks like

3. Pay attention to what you crave

Your want for certain types of fare could also be a warning sign that you have a health issue worth addressing. If you're constantly reaching for sweets and starchy foods, for example, it might mean that your body isn't metabolizing carbohydrates normally, says Cederquist. That means your body isn't able to move glucose into your cells for energy, so you end up feeling deprived and wanting to eat more carbs.

"This can occur even after someone has eaten a full meal," she says. "It makes people think their cravings must be emotional, but it's not necessarily the case."

If you feel that might be the culprit behind your cravings, see a medical professional.

4. Stop the train of thought

Once a craving comes on, says Wansink, "We tend to keep imagining what it would be like to eat the food we have in mind -- the texture, crunch, smoothness, richness, and so forth. Doing that makes the craving more extreme." Therefore, distracting yourself from the thought can be enough to make you forget about it. He advises chewing sugar-free gum, as simply having something in your mouth will eliminate your ability to imagine having food instead.

5. Look for a distraction

Before you start nibbling on whatever your mind wants, take a few minutes to drink a glass of water or walk around the block. These two steps help, says Cederquist, because they separate you from the craving. "That separation gives you the time and space to reflect upon the healthy diet you're trying to maintain and how eating this food might take you off-course from that plan," she says.

Another option is to sip something warm, like a cup of herbal tea. Drinking a hot beverage takes time, is filling, and stimulates the vagus nerve -- which helps manage digestion and can decrease cravings, especially for sugary foods, says Cederquist.

6. Cut yourself a break (but a small one)

If you've assessed your hunger, waited and can't kick the craving, it's time to give in -- but in small doses. "Try eating only one-fourth of the portion size you really want, then put the rest away and distract yourself for 15 minutes," suggests Wansink. "See how you feel after that time has passed. Chances are, you'll be equally satisfied as if you had eaten the whole thing."

7. Prevent food cravings in the first place

One of the questions you should ask yourself when you first detect a craving is what you already ate today that could be triggering it. For example, eating candy or desserts can spur the craving for more sweetness, especially when eaten on an empty stomach, says Cederquist. To sidestep that kind of reaction in the future, she recommends including protein and fiber in every meal and snack; doing so can limit subsequent cravings by decreasing the blood sugar response.

If you follow these tips and still feel compelled to devour certain foods, Cederquist recommends consulting your doctor; he or she can test your levels of glucose, insulin, glycohemoglobin, triglycerides, and HDL -- which can all be helpful to identify conditions such as metabolic dysfunction. Making a diagnosis like that can be your first step in figuring out a meal plan that can negate those nagging cravings and keep your weight in check.

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
more...
Curtis teale's curator insight, July 16, 2015 8:45 PM

Check out our product Crave-Stop to eliminate sugar, sweet, chocolate and carb cravings! Say goodbye to those unwanted cravings. Feel free to view our website on www.crave-stop.com 

Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Rethinking Snacks & Comfort Foods: 7 Tips

Rethinking Snacks & Comfort Foods: 7 Tips | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
The next time you feel like foraging in the cupboard or fridge, consider that mindless snacking can pack on the pounds. Here, Cleveland Clinic registered dietit

Via Skip Boykin, Isata Jalloh
more...
Isata Jalloh's curator insight, November 14, 2014 7:28 PM

Yumm, making your own ice cream using fresh fruit, yogurt & freezing it. Might have to try that. 

Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Stress early in life leads to adulthood anxiety and preference for 'comfort foods'

Stress early in life leads to adulthood anxiety and preference for 'comfort foods' | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it

“Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, suggests that exposure to stress in the first few days of life increases stress responses, anxiety and the consumption of palatable "comfort" foods in adulthood.”

 

"Comfort foods" have been defined as the foods eaten in response to emotional stress, and are suggested to contribute to the obesity epidemic. Hormonal responses to chronic stress in adulthood seem to play a role in the increased preference for this type of food, especially in women.

 

In this study, we aimed at verifying if an exposure to stress very early during development could also lead to increased consumption of comfort food in adult life, and if increased anxiety and stress responses were persistently affected by early adversity." http://buff.ly/16LszTb


Via The New Media Moguls, Isata Jalloh
more...
Isata Jalloh's curator insight, November 14, 2014 7:32 PM

Comfort foods can be one's way of self medicating..

Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Physical vs. Emotional Hunger & How to Tell the Difference

Physical vs. Emotional Hunger & How to Tell the Difference | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Your body is like an amazing computer. If you know how to listen, it will tell you when you're hungry and also when you've had enough to eat. If you've been a chronic dieter, you may not be able to recognize the signals your body is sending you. Overcoming emotional eating requires you to [...]

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48), Isata Jalloh
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Emotional Eating and Weight Loss

Emotional Eating and Weight Loss | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Emotional eating can sabatoge your weight loss efforts. Get tips for conquering this bad habit in the short term and getting to the root of the problem.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isata Jalloh
Scoop.it!

12 Weird Tricks to Conquer Emotional Eating

12 Weird Tricks to Conquer Emotional Eating | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Here's how to cope when you are emotionally eating to feel better or because you lack the confidence to accept a healthier you.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Isata Jalloh
Scoop.it!

Emotional Eating: How to Overcome It

Emotional Eating: How to Overcome It | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Do you eat when you're stressed, angry, or sad? Emotional eating can derail your diet. You can get past it. Find out how at WebMD.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Physical and Mental Health - Exercise, Fitness and Activity
Scoop.it!

Fixing emotional eating

Fixing emotional eating | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
A psychologist explains how to master 'mindful eating'.

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Comfort Food Is Real: Scientists Discover 'Good Mood Foods'

Comfort Food Is Real: Scientists Discover 'Good Mood Foods' | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Comfort Food Is Real: Scientists Discover 'Good Mood Foods'...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Why comfort foods don't actually make you feel better

Why comfort foods don't actually make you feel better | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
A new study says that you may be mistaken to believe that eating certain foods will make you feel better when you’re down. We may simply...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

Microsoft designs smart bra to combat emotional eating

Microsoft designs smart bra to combat emotional eating | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
Wearable sensors measure both electrodermal activity and EKG data.

Via Zymymar, Isata Jalloh
more...
Isata Jalloh's curator insight, November 14, 2014 7:59 PM

Interesting and a little scary at the same time...

Rescooped by Isata Jalloh from Comfort Foods.
Scoop.it!

6 Ways To Control Emotional Eating

6 Ways To Control Emotional Eating | Comfort Foods & Emotional Eating | Scoop.it
We are in the middle of an obesity epidemic that is showing no signs of slowing down, and although there are a few things that can be said about accepting who you are, being confident and not being superficial when it comes to looks, the fact of...

Via Thomas Faltin, Isata Jalloh
more...
No comment yet.