Colour Photography
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Colour Photography
A selection of colour photographic series
Curated by Azurebumble
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Brandon Lattu : Photography (Conceptual)

Brandon Lattu : Photography (Conceptual) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
Brandon Lattu is a conceptualist who uses photography, sculpture, and digitally based imagery, Lattu has carefully labored over the most intricate details of his images to produce works that seduce with a deceptively simple and elegant beauty. At the same time these images resonate on an equally powerful sentient level. The manipulation, clarity, and overload of information in these images triggers the recognition that we can visually imagine a scene such as this but we will never see in this way. In “Miracle Mile”, Lattu utilizes the extent of photographic technology to produce a series of views looking West down the length of ‘Wilshire Boulevard’ between ‘La Brea’ and ‘Fairfax Avenues’ in Los Angeles.

Presented on a pure field of black, the only images depicted are the illuminated signs. Contrasting this black field of nothingness, each sign is presented in its accurate place and scale in relation to the section depicted. Perspective is eliminated and some signs appear backwards as one might see them while looking in a side view mirror from a car at night. With careful inspection the viewer becomes aware that commercial competition is investigated in this piece through the presence of stores directly across the street from one another. For example, on the north side of the street, Rite Aid, Staples and Blockbuster vie with Sav-on, Office Depot and Hollywood video on the south side offering essentially the same products. Here and throughout Lattu’s oeuvre, the instinctual attraction of sublime visual pleasure becomes inseparable from intellectual engagement.
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Gail Albert Halaban : ‘Out My Window’ Series (Photography)

Gail Albert Halaban : ‘Out My Window’ Series (Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
Initially, these images resemble formal studies in which architectural grids create syncopating, all-over visual rhythms. Then you notice that there are people in some of the apartments. None of them are doing anything exciting. There is no sex or violence. But there is something compelling about being able to see into the private worlds of ordinary people. The voyeuristic, slightly melancholy effect recalls certain paintings by Edward Hopper. Halaban also took pictures of people while in their apartments with them, and these have a poignant intimacy. They resemble photographs by Philip-Lorca diCorcia. One breathtaking example shows a woman wrapped in a bath towel sitting on the edge of her bathtub and gazing out through glass walls over the city. While the photographs shot from distant windows suggest a kind of surveillance, in fact the artist collaborated with her subjects and asked them to pose and position themselves in their homes for the camera. So they are a form of portraiture. Scale is important too. Because the people are so tiny in proportion to the whole picture, there is an expansive effect. And for the same reason, there is a sense of social amplitude: so many buildings, so many people, so many stories in the big city..
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Constantine Manos : ‘Times Square at Night’ (Photography)

Constantine Manos : ‘Times Square at Night’ (Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
“The flow of people in a setting, their changing relationships to each other and their environment, and their ever changing expressions and movements – all combine to create dynamic situations that provide the photographer with limitless choices of when to push the button. By choosing a precise intersection between subject and time, he may transform the ordinary into the extraordinary and the real into the surreal.” – c.m.
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Ronan Guillou : Colour Photography ( Series 2 )

Ronan Guillou : Colour Photography ( Series 2 ) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
If his photographs suggest a poetic vision of the ordinary and call upon the imagination of each and every one of us, they also question us on the temporality [material matter] of places, reveal their nearly organic power as well as their fragility, and examine man’s relationship with the constructed universe. The use of a medium-sized format allows the artist to give priority to immediate contact with his subject while remaining in touch with the elements outside of the frame.

Color is also at the heart of the production process as the decisive material of the formal approach; if in fact it makes it possible to reveal the geometrical force of spaces and the poetic dimension of certain scenes, it tends to pay tribute to traditional American iconography as well. The entirety of Ronan’s work is produced on negative film and no retouching is carried out on the originals, leaving the photographers point of view intact and without distortion.
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Vincent Fournier : ‘Space Project’ Series (Photography)

Vincent Fournier : ‘Space Project’ Series (Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
The Space Project is work based upon Jules Vernes book, “From the Earth to the Moon”. It is a photographic archive of the most representative space organizations in the world: Gagarine Cosmonaut Training Center near Moscow (Russia), Mars Desert Research Station in Utah (US), observatories in the Atacama Desert (Chile), and the Guyana Space Center in Kourou (French Guiana). This project came from the experience that we all have whilst looking at the stars during our childhood, when we suddenly realize the infinity of the universe and that we are but a tiny part of it. The photographs give you a sense of the finished and unfinished, the feeling of the rhythm of time by looking at the movements of the planets. It is about the unseen, the mystery of space travel and the universe around us, leaving viewers with an intense but at the same time comfortable feeling, like a reconciliation with the sky and the Earth.
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Edgar Martins : ‘The Time Machine’ Series (Photography)

Edgar Martins : ‘The Time Machine’ Series (Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
Edgar Martins reveals ‘The Time Machine’ a body of previously unseen works, shot between 2010 and 2011. Structured as a topographic survey of hydro-electricity generating plants in Martins’ native Portugal, The Time Machine deals with the succession of radical transformations in the Portuguese society and its traditional industries, during the 20th and 21st centuries. Working closely with the EDP Foundation, Martins gained exclusive access to 19 power plants located across the country. Many of the power stations were built in the 1970s, towards the end of António de Oliveira Salazar’s regime, a time of hopeful prospects of rapid economic growth and social change. Their purpose was to fuel the country’s expansion and propel it into a prosperous future. Forty years on, seemingly deserted, they still function, however they’re now potent reminders of the failure of the Portuguese Modernist project.

Tense with unrealized expectations, the photographs in The Time Machine capture a powerful yet visibly outdated artillery of analog machinery; deserted offices and meeting rooms; vast, sterile-looking turbine halls and control rooms, all devoid of people. The absence of beings, despite an abundance of space, means that there is often no sense of scale or direction in the works. How the technology is operated, and indeed, who operates it, remains a mystery – that is if the power stations are operational (and real) at all, a hovering question considering their pristine allure. As always with Martins, what seems to be, at a first glance, apparently bright places are, in reality, dark. Using prolonged exposure times and intensive lighting, Martins creates seemingly factitious environments: the lack of shadows, synthetic colours and surreal contrasts highlight the apparent artificiality in both, the power stations, and the act of taking photographs. The scenes are entirely static yet refer to a dynamic conception of time, one that envisions “scenarios of a retrospective future or futuristic glimpses of the past: the future as it might have been conceived fifty years ago or more”
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Sabine Hornig : ‘Windows’ Series (Photography)

Sabine Hornig : ‘Windows’ Series (Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
For Sabine Hornig, the window represents a basic, transparent, grid-like system that incorporates her ideas on the gaze, view and perspective, which oscillate between image and sculpture. Hornig finds the windows she uses in her photographs incidentally in modern cities, mostly in Berlin. Intentionally made visible or invisible, the window functions as a prevalent frame that contains certain flows, a certain motility between interior and exterior, public and private, transparency and distortion, open and closed space, and associated with this last pairing of terms, flight and confinement.

Through her activity of foregrounding the transparency (rather than the transparentness) of the palimpsestual threshold of the glass/window in her photographs, Hornig obliges us to become aware of glass (by means of Plexiglas) as a complex structure, a responsive surface and the window as a doubling boundary. In her recent suite of photographs of vacant shop windows, the artist not only expands on our awareness of the optics of the window as a sill, but raises these abandoned commercial spaces from their state of quiescent limbo to places where, in their emptiness, we are given reign to imagine past identity and future existence, where our emotions swing between melancholy and hope in the face of our ever-changing, mutant cities.
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Paul van Hulzen : ‘On the Road’ Series (Photography)

Paul van Hulzen : ‘On the Road’ Series (Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
Paul van Hulzen photographs ‘places’. Besides urban locations, these can also include ‘landscapes’, interiors and even objects. He makes no fundamental distinction between a ‘natural landscape’ and a more urban environment. On the contrary, Paul believes that a built-up location or an interior can be more ‘landscape-like’ than a landscape in the traditional sense. His starting point is always the ‘spatiality’ created by human intervention. Within this spatiality, he searches for, and finds a specific beauty and an atmosphere that can be contemplative, ironic and disturbing all at once. Paul is regularly referred to as the ‘painting photographer’, and he is undeniably inspired by painters. For him, Rothko, Hockney, Hopper, Wyeth, Pollock and Armando are ‘model’ thinkers and artists. The same goes for photographers like Eggleston, Shore and Wessel, and for the filmmakers Antonioni and Tarkovsky…
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Ronan Guillou : ‘Colour Photography’ ( Series 1 )

Ronan Guillou : ‘Colour Photography’ ( Series 1 ) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
Catching places, cities, glances: Ronan Guillou translates his pleasure and desire for keeping traces of them during his walks. Cities, and the people who animate them, are the basis of his humanistic approach. Aside from his commercial campaigns, Guillou’s personal work records moments of ordinary life, where men and women are photographed during their daily routines in urban landscapes. Initially influenced by cinematic environments and the aesthetics of American cities, his work also extends to cities in Asia, Europe and South America. Without criticism, Guillou feels affection and empathy for his characters, giving the images a pictorialist and poetic depthn ...
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Saul Leiter : Photography (Early Colour)

Saul Leiter : Photography (Early Colour) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
“Mr. Leiter was a photographer less of people than of perception itself. His painter’s instincts served him well in his emphasis on surface, spatial ambiguity and a lush, carefully calibrated palette. But the abstract allure of his work doesn’t rely on soft focus, a persistent, often irritating photographic ploy, or the stark isolation of details, in the manner of Aaron Siskind or early Harry Callahan. Instead, Mr. Leiter captured the passing illusions of everyday life with a precision that might almost seem scientific, if it weren’t so poetically resonant and visually layered.” Robert Smith : Art critic : 2005.
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William Eckersley : “Dark City” Series (Night Photography)

William Eckersley : “Dark City” Series (Night Photography) | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
At night, a once flat world illuminated by dull, grey daylight is transformed under the cloak of darkness. Garish spotlighting casts deep shadows and silhouettes, with hues of pink, cyan and orange. The stage is devoid of its human players and seems to showcase the scenery’s forgotten beauty, revealing a stark and otherworldly aesthetic in a city drained of its occupants. The built environment, deliberately contrived to service the needs and desires of humanity, makes sense in the context of teeming human life – without this however, its inherent functionality no longer visible, our urban spaces appeared to stand forlorn, waiting to be judged on their genius or folly, beauty or ugliness…
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Ernst Haas : Colour Photography

Ernst Haas : Colour Photography | Colour Photography | Scoop.it
“I never really wanted to be a photographer. It slowly grew out of the compromise of a boy who desired to combine two goals — explorer or painter. I wanted to travel, see and experience. What better profession could there be than the one of a photographer, almost a painter in a hurry, overwhelmed by too many constantly changing impressions? But all my inspirational influences came much more from all the arts than from photo magazines.” – Ernst Haas

 

Haas’s frustration with the limitations of technology pushed him at every turn to be slightly ahead of his time. He was a technological pioneer with the eye of a painter and the soul of a poet. It has been written that before Haas there was no color photography, only colored photographs. Haas’s first color essay was on New York, the city he would ultimately make his home. When the editors of LIFE magazine saw it, they gave it an unheard-of layout of 24 pages and called it “Magic Images of a City”.

 

Essays on Paris and Venice followed. Ten years later, when the Museum of Modern Art held their first color retrospective, it was the work of Haas they chose to feature. Though a Magnum photographer in the heyday of photojournalism, Haas was not interested in color as reportage. He was interested in the super-reality of dreams. To achieve this he gave commonplace objects and silhouettes new meaning. A reflection brought home the hidden depths underlying a conventional urban storefront; torn posters peeling off buildings shaped themselves into an art gallery. In his quest to produce feelings, he introduced hues and tones never before seen in printed color. And at all times his work was informed and enlightened by a guiding intelligence capable of great and quizzical humor. – [Essay by Inge Bondi] 

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