College
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mariya Lutskova
Scoop.it!

Transferring From Community College To University Of Chicago

Transferring From Community College To University Of Chicago | College | Scoop.it
How to transfer from community college to University of Chicago. Learn what you need to get accepted as a community college transfer student!
Mariya Lutskova's insight:

Even though this is tips for University of Chicago, the information given here is revelent to all transfer students. In this arcticle the author highlights the importance of creating a two year plan that will keep you on track. And not to settle for average because the colleges arent looking for average scores and performance, but rather students who try thier hardest. And when you try your hardest it reflects. Also make sure to create a structered two year plan that you could stick to. that way when getting the transfer you have completed everything. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariya Lutskova from What's Good To Know
Scoop.it!

If College Is For You, So Is This Article

College shouldn't just be the next step after high school. It's a place of higher education that is chalked full of life choices. It is important to consider the entire picture when making decisions about the new world into which you will enter. No matter how long it may seem to take or what you have to go through in the process, don't ever give up on your collegiate career! In the heat of the moment, something or someone may hold more appeal than all the studying and endless exams, but in the end, that certificate of graduation will be well worth whatever you have to do to get it. When you are trying to choose a school that you would like to attend you should weigh all of the pros and cons of the school compared to what your major will be. You can find many lists that tell you what the department at the school you are interested in ranks. If you want to get an education on a limited budget, consider going to a community college for two years before transferring to a different universities. You will find that community colleges are cheaper than other schools and your credits will transfer as long as you complete your general education before transferring. Use online resources to study at home. Popular study aids include Quizlet and Memrise. You can use these websites to create flashcards for your class. Often, someone else has already made flashcards for your class or subject of study. In this case, you can use what is already available to study. When you are choosing a major, do not simply think about money. You do not want a career in something that you find boring or uninteresting. A good choice is a major that will keep you interested fifty or more hours a week for the rest of your life. Explore your interests. Do not fall into the credit card company's tricks where they give you a credit card. These cards have high interest rates, and they aim to prey on college students who have no money. There are many instances in which college student's default on these cards because they understandably have no money to pay them back. Consider living on campus even if you go to school close to home. Not only will you miss a lot of things going on, but you may miss out on your first opportunity to live on your own and make your own financial and social decisions. If you can possibly afford it, live in a dorm. Make the effort to get to know each of your instructors. Use office hours to visit each instructor at least once during the term. If the instructor is teaching a class in your major or intended major, spend more time in office hours. When you need a letter of recommendation, it will be easier if your instructors know you. Create and maintain positive, healthy relationships with professors. Professors are the best resources in college. Ask them questions and offer to provide them with assistance as well. Having a good relationship with your professors will mean better grades and opportunities, so do not forget their importance in your success. Wake up and go to bed at the same time every day. College students find that academics, jobs and a social life can all take a toll on the way they look, feel and perform. If you do not get enough sleep, you will not be able to concentrate on your classes. Now that you've come to the end of this article, you can start planning your college experience. You will be a successful student if you know what to expect and are ready to work hard.


Via mrydd29
Mariya Lutskova's insight:

This confirming alot of the information that I have been exposed to first hand. For example my cousin who graduated from a community college with a nursing degree is out earning my cousin who graduated from an university. I was curious to see if this was true in more cases than just the one with my cousins. And apparently it is. This was actually one of my deciding factors between community college and an university.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariya Lutskova from Healthcare News
Scoop.it!

Despite transfer roadblocks, community college transfers as likely to earn BA as 4-year

Despite transfer roadblocks, community college transfers as likely to earn BA as 4-year | College | Scoop.it

Students who begin their postsecondary education at a community college and successfully transfer to a four-year college have BA graduation rates equal to similar students who begin at four-year colleges, according to new research published today. That rate would actually increase — to 54 percent from 46 percent — if not for the loss of academic credits when students transfer, said study authors.”The Community College Route to the Bachelor’s Degree,” by Paul Attewell and David Monaghan, both of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, will be published online today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis (EEPA), a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association (AERA).Attewell and Monaghan found that students who begin their postsecondary education at a community college are indeed less likely to earn a bachelor’s degree than otherwise similar undergraduates who begin at a four-year school. However, contrary to an earlier generation of research, there are no significant differences in BA completion rates between those students who started at a community college and successfully transferred and their peers who began at four-year schools.Attewell and Monaghan identified restrictive credit transfer policies — and not a lack of academic preparation, an emphasis on vocational training, or a lack of financial aid — as the reason for the gap in BA attainment between otherwise similar undergraduates who enter community colleges and their four-year counterparts.”Loss of credits is a tax on transfer students,” Monaghan said. “Policymakers should be pushing both community colleges and four-year institutions to address it.”"Community colleges should be encouraged to invest more in transfer counseling services for their students, and more four-year institutions need to develop processes for facilitating, not hindering, credit transfer for academically qualified students,” said Monaghan.Attewell and Monaghan found that:Only 58 percent of transfers are able to bring all or almost all (90 percent or more) of their credits with them. About 14 percent of transfers lose more than 90 percent of their credits. The remaining 28 percent lose between 10 percent and 89 percent of their credits. Even after controlling for college GPA and credits earned, students who can transfer most of their credits are more likely to complete a BA than those who cannot.Students who have all or almost all their credits transferred are 2.5 times more likely to earn a BA than students with less than half their credits transferred. Students who get between half and 89 percent of their credits accepted have a 74 percent higher chance of earning a BA. The implication is that students who are able to transfer all or most of their community college credits are more likely to graduate than peers who started their postsecondary education at a four-year school.Some states, such as New Jersey, mandate that all for-credit courses earned in state community colleges must count toward BA graduation after transfer to a state four-year college. Modeling a “what if” scenario for this policy in all states, Attewell and Monaghan project that BA attainment among community college transfer students would rise to 54 percent from 46 percent.”This percentage is potentially underestimated,” said Attewell. … http://www.mybiologica.com/47359/miscellanea/despite-transfer-roadblocks-community-college-transfers-as-likely-to-earn-ba-as-4-year.html


Via Francesco Colasuonno
Mariya Lutskova's insight:

Transferring might not be successful depending on the school and types of credits. Its important to figure out what credits transfer and how before signing up for classes. Also it is important to note that the transfer doesnt hinder at a chance for a bechelors degree.

more...
No comment yet.