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Rescooped by Brenna Robert from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Why Criticism Matters - Essay by Sam Anderson

Why Criticism Matters - Essay by Sam Anderson | college | Scoop.it
The contemporary critic has to be an evangelist — implicitly or explicitly — not just for a particular book or author, but for literary experience itself.

 

What we can say, for sure, is that sustained exposure to the Internet is changing the way many readers process the written word. Texts are shorter and more flagrantly interconnected, with all kinds of secret passageways running into and out of one another. This has already changed the way we produce, read, share and digest our writing. Inevitably, it will also redefine what it means to practice book criticism, at least for those of us who aspire to write for something like a general audience.


Via Mary Daniels Brown, Lynnette Van Dyke
Brenna Robert's insight:

I agree that we need criticism to improve in life.

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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:15 PM

Originally published in 2011, but still relevant today, I think, particularly next to the piece that follows this one here.

Rescooped by Brenna Robert from Learning & Mind & Brain
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5 Reasons To Allow Digital Devices In Your Classroom

5 Reasons To Allow Digital Devices In Your Classroom | college | Scoop.it

Amidst reports of Steve Jobs and other Silicon Valley CEOs imposing extremely strict technology rules on their children, the debate around technology use in the classroom has caught fire once again. One of the strongest arguments for banning technology in the classroom came earlier this fall, from media pundit Clay Shirky in a piece titled “Why I Just Asked My Students To Put Their Laptops Away.”

 

In principle, I agree with a lot of what Shirky writes—multiple studies confirm the cognitive toll that distractions and multitasking inflict on learning; his argument that social media is designed both in form and content to distract has merit; and as an email-addict myself, I know that feeling of “instant and satisfying gratification” he describes all too well. Suggesting, however, that enforcing a technology ban is the solution to students’ lack of engagement strikes me both as insecure and a wee bit simplistic.

 

Surely, learning can take place in the absence of technology. But valuable learning can also take place in the presence of it. In my own experience as a foreign language instructor, I have found that there are many benefits to allowing—and in certain cases encouraging—students to use digital devices in class, five of which are outlined below.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Brenna Robert's insight:

I find this interesting because we are taught in middle and high school that we can never have our phones out in class. Whereas now, many are arguing for their uses.

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Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:48 PM

When I read the arguments about digital distractions, I actually think - how good are these person's classroom management skills.  Any kind of object shouldn't be a distraction.  Develop signals for regaining your classroom's attention.  Coin some phrases like - Device Down & Power Up.  Create some simple symbols to show your students when it is or isn't appropriate to have their device out.

Rescooped by Brenna Robert from Learning & Mind & Brain
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Researchers Identify Brain Regions That Encode Words, Grammar and Story

Researchers Identify Brain Regions That Encode Words, Grammar and Story | college | Scoop.it
Researchers from CMU’s Machine Learning Department performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of eight people as they read a chapter of that Potter book. They then analyzed the scans, cubic millimeter by cubic millimeter, for every four-word segment of that chapter. The result was the first integrated computational model of reading, identifying which parts of the brain are responsible for such subprocesses as parsing sentences, determining the meaning of words and understanding relationships between characters.

As Leila Wehbe, a Ph.D. student in the Machine Learning Department, and Tom Mitchell, the department head, report today in the online journal PLOS ONE, the model was able to predict fMRI activity for novel text passages with sufficient accuracy to tell which of two different passages a person was reading with 74 percent accuracy.

“At first, we were skeptical of whether this would work at all,” Mitchell said, noting that analyzing multiple subprocesses of the brain at the same time is unprecedented in cognitive neuroscience. “But it turned out amazingly well and now we have these wonderful brain maps that describe where in the brain you’re thinking about a wide variety of things.”

Via Miloš Bajčetić
Brenna Robert's insight:

This is incredible. It's amazing how current science can allow us to see how people develop thoughts and where they are processed.

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Keeping students safe on Penn's campus - Philly.com

Keeping students safe on Penn's campus - Philly.com | college | Scoop.it
The complaint came in to the University of Pennsylvania police headquarters about 12:40 a.m. on a Saturday:
Loud music at an off-campus house.
Brenna Robert's insight:

This relates to me as I am interested in UPenn and I've heard from many people that college campuses aren't very safe.

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