Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
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Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning
Collective intelligence is a shared or group intelligence involving knowledge creation and flow. Pooled brainpower emerges from the collaboration and learning actions of a community of connected individuals empowered by social media, participatory tools, and mobile platforms.
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Libboo To Find The Next Digital Bestseller

Libboo To Find The Next Digital Bestseller | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Libboo shifted gears earlier this year, moving away from crowdsourced, team publishing to discovery. The idea being that books still lack their Pandora — a killer discovery mechanism that helps everyday readers find new, unknown authors and in turn helps wordsmiths expose their work to new audiences.

 

The company's vision is to create a better way for independent and established authors to get their work discovered — and to be rewarded for producing awesome content. In today’s world, talent tends to get lost amidst the noise, so Libboo is attempting to provide authors and publishers with an alternative to focusing all their energies on creating hits — content they know has a better shot at becoming a hit.

 

To do this, Libboo connects “buzzers,” or those readers who are vocal in support of great books and content with indie authors they’ll enjoy, based on their taste profiles. In turn for helping to expose authors’ works to new audiences via social networking, blogs and email, readers are rewarded with free eBooks and are given the opportunity to increase their influence within the Libboo community, becoming prime targets for future perks from authors and publishers alike.

 

CEO Chris Howard says that his Libboo is on a mission to create a new avenue for books to become bestsellers. Under the current model, it really doesn’t matter how good the book is if no one is going to read it, so by creating a forum that attracts avid readers and sharers, Libboo is hoping to create a ready-made sea of eyeballs that will help authors increase their reach and act as a sandbox that will surface the best content and the next big digital bestseller.

 

 

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How Technology Is Empowering Teachers, Minting Millionaires, And Improving Education

How Technology Is Empowering Teachers, Minting Millionaires, And Improving Education | Collective Intelligence & Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Thanks to the rise of in-classroom technology, the focus in education tends to be on student engagement and how to improve learning. It becomes easy to forget the importance of great teachers.

 

Thanks to the rise of in-classroom technology, the focus in education tends to be on student engagement and how to improve learning. It becomes easy to forget the importance of great teachers. Startups, entrepreneurs, businesses (and the rest) need to remember that technology doesn’t have to put teachers in jeopardy; it can help them lead the education evolution.

 

TeachersPayTeachers, is a platform that enables teachers to buy, sell, and share their original content and lesson plans. Deanna Jump, a 43-year-old kindergarten and first grade teacher at Quail Run Elementary in Warner Robins, Georgia, is the first on the platform to pass $1 million in sales, having amassed 17,000 followers and sold 160,000 items since joining the platform three years ago.

 

When we asked the founder of Teachers pay Teachers what had led to the recent hockey-stick growth, he had a couple of really interesting conclusions. Word of mouth, both traditional and digital, has benefited both the supply and demand (of teachers and content), but online, he said that Pinterest has been driving more traffic than Google, Yahoo, Bing and Facebook combined. 

 

The other dirty little secret, the founder says, is that the materials and content teachers are creating themselves is “just superior” to what the majority of educational publishers produce. Publishers might argue otherwise, but it’s not surprising why teachers would find more value in materials contributed by their colleagues during the school year in a classroom context. 

 

 

 

 

 

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