Collaborationweb
13.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by David Hain
onto Collaborationweb
Scoop.it!

The Valuable Links Between Stories and Our Collective Actions

The Valuable Links Between Stories and Our Collective Actions | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Story as a catalyst for meaning & purpose.

 

Amid all the talk about content, content marketing, and a host of hybridized new media and journalistic disciplines, it's funny that pundits rarely, if ever, talk about stories themselves or storytelling as a layered discipline in and of itself.

more...
david o'connor's comment, February 1, 2013 5:01 AM
David, I really like this scoop, really useful. I am an evangelist for purposeful branding. purposeful storytelling and experiential learning is fundamental to igniting purpose. Thank you.
David Hain's comment, February 1, 2013 6:39 AM
Thanks David, Gregg is really the man re stories - well worth a follow along with Karen Dietz.
Collaborationweb
People working together to make things better
Curated by David Hain
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Key to Any Collaboration Is…

The Key to Any Collaboration Is… | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
I know of a global organization where people are hired for their technical expertise, not their interpersonal skills. When a key team started to have a lot of friction and constantly missed deadlines, they brought in a leadership coach for the leader of that team. The coach found that the leader was only focused on his own perspective of what was going wrong with the team. He had no sense of what people on the team thought or felt.

He never tried to learn how they saw things, let alone get to know them. What this leader lacked was skill at teamwork, a competency of emotional intelligence. 
David Hain's insight:

All of us are smarter than any of us! Goleman on collaboration.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The continuum - where are you now?

The continuum - where are you now? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In The Neo-Generalist, Kenneth Mikkelsen and I explore how those with a preference for polymathic generalism nevertheless find themselves in constant and restless motion, responding and adapting to context. We illustrate our argument with stories drawn from interviewees, historical figures, business, activism, science, sport, the military, art and popular culture.
David Hain's insight:

How we define ourselves and the contribution we make changes with time and context. A helpful framework for self-analysis and meaning making from one of the authors of 'The Neo-Generalist'.

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, February 12, 9:49 PM
I love the continuum diagram and reckon its probably more than venn
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Dr. Russell Ackoff, Design is the Answer —

Dr. Russell Ackoff, Design is the Answer — | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them”
— Albert Einstein
Like Einstein, Ackoff thrived on creative thinking and would constantly shift boundaries to reframe problems, including the problem of problems and problem solving. How very meta of him.

He explained his thinking so beautifully, when he said, “a problem is to reality what an atom is to a table. People experience tables not atoms”. We experience the whole, and reality is a whole mess of problems interacting simultaneously. “Reality is a system of problems”.

So, if problems are just interacting concepts which create reality, the real question we should be asking ourselves is not how can we solve this problem? But, how can we change our reality?
David Hain's insight:

The late, great Russell Ackoff on systems thinking applied to problem solving.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

The Myth of The Learning Organisation

The Myth of The Learning Organisation | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
If you really want a Learning Organisation you must build the capacity to change the internal dialogue. It is dialogue that has created who we are and only a change in our dialogue will change that. To change the dialogue means much more than changing the topic of conversation, you’ll rarely manage that over any period of time. (Networks will decide on their topic of conversation based on their sense of identity.) Instead the route is to change the relationships within and between networks, across silos and across the organisational boundary. This is not the crude and crass ‘cut and paste’ of organisational restructures. This is a qualitative change in how people are in relationship with each other, how they decide what matters, how they respond to new information and new people.

When you are prepared to embark on this you rapidly uncover deep learning. Kurt Lewin said that you never really understand a system until you try to change it. As you begin to try and change things, you provoke a reaction from people’s sense of organisational identity that tells you where the real work lies. Your first attempts at change are never successful in anything more than pointing you at where you really need to do your work. Too often at that point we step away feeling our job is done. This is never short work and nor is it for the faint of heart. (That is why large advisory companies and strategy consultancies never follow such processes, the real work takes place over time, within the organisation, not amongst an army of paid hired-hands.) But it is the route to lasting and sustainable change that can create an identity capable of adapting in symbiosis with a changing environment. If you want a sustainable organisation then qualitative change in the internal dialogue is the way to grow it.

David Hain's insight:

Really good piece on why learning organisation work rarely grew sustainable roots, and what to do to make it really lasting and meaningful. H/T Celine Schillinger.

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, February 2, 4:25 PM
Love the premise of changing the internal dialogue and this "To change the dialogue means much more than changing the topic of conversation, you’ll rarely manage that over any period of time. (Networks will decide on their topic of conversation based on their sense of identity.) Instead the route is to change the relationships within and between networks, across silos and across the organisational boundary. This is not the crude and crass ‘cut and paste’ of organisational restructures. This is a qualitative change in how people are in relationship with each other, how they decide what matters, how they respond to new information and new people."
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

perpetual beta 2017

perpetual beta 2017 | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“More and more, the unit of comprehension is going to be group comprehension, where you simply have to rely on a team of others because you can’t understand it all yourself. There was a time, oh, I would say as recently as, certainly as the 18th century, when really smart people could aspire to having a fairly good understanding of just about everything … Well that’s the fragility, the hyper-fragility of civilisation right there. We could all be bounced back into the 19th century.” —Daniel Dennett
David Hain's insight:

Why collaborative skills, and a clear map of when to  apply them, are already hugely important; and will only become more so. Excellent landscape summary from Harold Jarche. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Deal with the system as a whole please - Cognitive Edge

Deal with the system as a whole please - Cognitive Edge | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

Reductionism in human thinking goes back to the early atomism of the Greeks and in a real sense we have never really shaken it off!  The idea is that you solve a problem by breaking it down into smaller parts, solving the small problems then putting it all back together again.  Workshop techniques do the same sort of thing; breaking things up, sending people to separate rooms then aggregating the results from multiple sets of butcher paper.

Aggregation is the corollary of reductionism and it is the common approach to both scaling and integration.  Putting things together in wider constructs based on defined interfaces or formal links.   All of this harks back to my earlier concerns in this series about categorisation, putting things into boxes and then fitting them together like a jigsaw.  Often the jigsaw pieces are simply forced together in the manner of a five year old who has not yet acquired the spacial awareness to do anything more subtle.   

Now the real problem with all of this is that aggregation and reduction is fine if you have a highly constrained system.  However if we shift to a complex one then the properties of the system as a whole is not the sum of the parts but are unique to the system as a whole.   So if we want to scale capabilities we can’t just add them together.   I’ve already written on scaling in a series of posts (final one here) so I won’t repeat that.   However there are some key stages we need to go through if we are integrating different or even similar things:

David Hain's insight:

The world isn't as simple as we would like to make it. Wise words on the dangers of reductionism and aggregation from the author of the Cynefin framework.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Transformation is being held back by learned helplessness

Transformation is being held back by learned helplessness | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
There is a key behaviour we must address before any collaboration technology can offer true transformative value: the learned helplessness of end users. A willingness to try and fail is sorely lacking when it comes to the tools we use every day at work. We’ve fully adopting the mentality of hands-off, call the help desk, it’s not my problem, in stark contrast to our private lives where we update apps and operating systems regularly, trying new tools and customising to suit our personal workflows.
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration is a more a mindset thing, less a technology thing! learned helplessness gets in the way...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Coalitional Instincts | Edge.org

Coalitional Instincts | Edge.org | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
A daunting new augmented reality was neurally kindled, overlying the older individual one. It is important to realize that this reality is constructed by and runs on our coalitional programs and has no independent existence. You are a member of a coalition only if someone (such as you) interprets you as being one, and you are not if no one does. We project coalitions onto everything, even where they have no place, such as in science. We ar
David Hain's insight:

Are we genetically conditioned towards groupthink?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

You Can't Cut Through Complexity - KPMG Got It Wrong - Intelligent Management

You Can't Cut Through Complexity - KPMG Got It Wrong - Intelligent Management | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Management is the science that studies how to create and guide human relationships within the framework of an organization, i.e. a well-defined realm of human relations and interactions. Understanding these interactions today involves re-thinking conventional, silo-based organizational structures and creating systemic structures.

Complexity, then, becomes for us the field of knowledge that examines how we can produce long-term, sustainable results and contribute to the betterment of the larger systems we are part of within a suitable organizational structure (a system of interdependencies aimed at well defined goals).

 In other words, complexity is about how organizations can produce economic results within the framework of a human-centered, ecologically-minded vision of the world. Don’t cut through complexity. Understand it, embrace it and leverage it.
David Hain's insight:

Yes, the world really is complex - but don't fall for the soundbites that make it sound easy to disguise!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Is There a Downside to Human Connection?

Is There a Downside to Human Connection? | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

 

If ever there was a time when one person could singlehandedly create the Next Big Thing, it's long gone. Now, collaboration and connection is king, which on the surface makes sense—the more ideas we can share with each other, the faster we'll arrive at something important. Except, new experiments suggest, that intuition is wrong: Having everyone's ideas on the table all at once can actually stifle innovation.

At issue is how human beings learn from each other, or, rather, how many people we can learn from, write Arizona State University researchers Maxime Derex and Robert Boyd in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In principle, the more people we interact with, the more we know, and the better prepared we are to tackle difficult problems, like, say, finding a vaccine for a dangerous disease. It's certainly true that most technological innovation these days is the result of recycling and re-combining old ideas, hinting at the possibility that simply accumulating more ideas would help people innovate. But how does that work out in practice?

 

David Hain's insight:

Moderation in all things - even collaboration?

more...
donhornsby's curator insight, November 28, 2017 10:48 AM
In other words, being too connected could lead to a kind of cultural lock-in, where societies find something that works OK and stick with it, oblivious to the existence of other ideas that could improve their fate. Connection isn't everything; the pattern of connection matters too. 
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

filter failure is not acceptable

filter failure is not acceptable | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Fake news. PR hype. Content marketing. Advertorials. Click bait. Propaganda. Doublespeak. Newspeak. Yellow journalism. Shock jocks. Post-truth. Spam. Phishing.

Digital information comes from all directions, and much of it from dubious sources or with the intent to misinform. Today, it is just too easy to create, replicate, and share digital information. As a result, we are enveloped in it. This is why ad blockers on browsers have become so popular. It’s why everyone needs spam filters for their email. Filter failure is not acceptable in the digital workplace. But neither is living in an information bubble.

The challenge for any organization dependent on knowledge is to ensure that implicit knowledge from those closest to customers and the external world informs the explicit knowledge that is shared throughout the company. Knowledge flow has to continuously become knowledge stock. Individuals practising personal knowledge mastery have to be an intrinsic part of organizational knowledge management. Knowledge comes from and through an organization’s people. It is not some external material distributed through the chain of command.
David Hain's insight:

Knowledge flow becomes knowledge stock. Understanding and enabling this is critical for organisations, says Harold Jarche. Uncommon sense!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Working in the open – Design like you mean it – Medium

Working in the open – Design like you mean it – Medium | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Working in the open means people start talking about what you are doing. Here at Good Things Foundation we think that leads to some interesting ideas. Not all of them will work — in fact I will blog about ones that don’t — but all interactions are useful and further everyone’s understanding of the problems that we are trying to solve.
David Hain's insight:

Working in the open as an aid to collaboration, iteration and engagement!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Two heads are better than one: why collaboration is key to disruption

Two heads are better than one: why collaboration is key to disruption | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Now, an increasing number of start-ups and established companies are realising the benefits of collaboration.

Challenging, rather than collaborating, leads to the demise of many start-ups, which fail to understand how their industry operates and how best they can maximise their place within it. Having a great idea is essential but, if we can combine this with buy-in from organisations who already possess power, we’re really cooking with fire.

It’s a simple concept: if a start-up shares the same goals as its more-established counterparts, it should seek to work collaboratively in order to drive real change. We are achieving this by collaborating with relevant industry bodies in health, progressing our mission to change the way the world views health and wellness, and this same approach can be adopted by entrepreneurs across many different industries.
David Hain's insight:

The benefits of setting off with a collaboration mindset hard-wired can include survival!

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Using technology to drive social change within your network

Using technology to drive social change within your network | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
At one time, almost every organisation used a ‘top-down’ approach to management and communication. The people at the top made all the decisions and everyone else did what they were told. Sales trends were used to guide product offerings but there was no direct engagement between the head honchos and the end user.

Now, teams can share ideas, information, and resources via cloud platforms. Members are encouraged to participate in decisions which can then inform product development and company policies.

Shared communication platforms such as Slack, Trello, and Salesforce mean that team members can be spread over different sites and even different countries. This functionality alone has led to a major increase in the number of employees now able to work from home.

Consumers can influence the decision-making process, too. In some cases, they may be invited to participate in team communications and provide feedback as products are customised for their needs. A more common way to gather consumer opinions is through online forums, product reviews, and social media campaigns. We now expect to engage with a company online and we dismiss those that haven’t risen to the challenge.

Businesses that have embraced this approach include Australian travel company, Helloworld. Their outstanding online marketing strategy has led to a huge increase in sales, leads, and productivity. The feedback they receive influences the range of holiday deals they offer and their high level of customer engagement sets them well apart from their competitors.

When businesses underestimate the power of public opinion, it can lead to disastrous consequences – as United Airlines learned the hard way earlier this year.
David Hain's insight:

Network communications key to creating collaborative change!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Collaborative working and the benefits it brings

Collaborative working and the benefits it brings | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

From winning sports teams to globally successful businesses, there are so many examples of how collaboration in teams can produce incredible results. Building and developing a collaborative culture within your team is key to improving the share of knowledge throughout your business, which will ultimately lead to a more efficient working environment. Whilst many people like the idea of working in a collaborative environment, they aren’t always willing to undertake the investment required to establish a fully collaborative workforce. 

As the working world becomes increasingly global, and teams are split across different geographies and time zones, the need for collaboration has never been so important. With new technologies and cloud-based systems offering teams the ability to communicate information and share knowledge, businesses should utilise the opportunities available to improve the collaboration amongst their teams. 

David Hain's insight:

@olliegardener on the benefits of collaboration, and a great tool to facilitate it!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

You Do Not Think Alone

You Do Not Think Alone | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“The Thinker,” Auguste Rodin’s bronze sculpture, has become a visual cliché, a common representation of deep thought — a figure, gazing down, chin on hand, completely alone. This is utterly misleading, according to the authors of “The Knowledge Illusion,” which carries the subtitle: “Why We Never Think Alone.” Steven Sloman, a professor at Brown University, and Philip Fernbach, a professor at the University of Colorado’s Leeds School of Business, argue that our intelligence depends on the people and things that surround us, and to a degree we rarely recognize. Knowledge, they say, is a community effort. Sloman answered questions from Mind Matters editor Gareth Cook. 
David Hain's insight:

It takes a village to help each one of us to think effectively...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Problems are Interconnected -- And so are Solutions - The Donella Meadows Project

Problems are Interconnected -- And so are Solutions - The Donella Meadows Project | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The way it is usually told, the message Everything is Connected to Everything Else is not fun to hear. It is intended to cause repentance and reformation. More often, of course, it causes guilt, fear, and an uncontrollable urge to avoid environmentalists.

What we are rarely told is that solutions are as interconnected as problems. One good environmental action can send out waves of good effects as impressive as the chain of disasters that results from environmental evil.

Take energy efficiency, for example. That doesn’t mean deprivation of creature comforts; it means insulating houses, driving cars with better mileage, and plugging in appliances that deliver the same service for less electricity. Amory Lovins of the Rocky Mountain Institute says we could reduce electricity use in the U.S. by 70% with already-proven and currently-economic efficiency measures. We could cut our $430 billion annual energy bill in half just by being as efficient as Japan and West Germany are.
David Hain's insight:

Forget about the butterfly's wings, there is a positive side to inter-connectedness - if we reframe our view of it!

more...
Ian Berry's curator insight, June 30, 2017 7:34 PM
Good reminder of the power of both/and. When it comes to solutions to problems acceptance of both/and is often the key to finding the third alternative
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 11, 2017 1:36 PM
Hannah Arendt contended that action is what transcends the space and time we exist in. Teaching is that way. What happens in this moment can transcend space and time, finding new solutions and creating new problems unexpectedly. If we teach children to be environmentally aware, it is a gift that will find its way into the future.
Sunny Ye's curator insight, July 15, 2017 2:32 AM
The butterfly effect
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Globalisation: Don’t patch it up - shake it up – OECD – Medium

Globalisation: Don’t patch it up - shake it up – OECD – Medium | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
Unless governments undertake fundamental changes — both individually and collectively — in the way our economies, societies, and political systems work, all our efforts will merely water the seeds of further crisis. We will see reversed the peace and progress that openness and multilateral cooperation have brought over decades.
The tackling of core concerns is long overdue: rising inequalities of income, wealth and opportunities; the growing disconnect between finance and the real economy; mounting divergence in productivity levels between workers, firms and regions; winner-take-most dynamics in many markets; limited progressivity of our tax systems; corruption and capture of politics and institutions by vested interests; lack of transparency and participation by ordinary citizens in decision-making; the soundness of the education and of the values we transmit to future generations.
David Hain's insight:

OECD on the future of globalisation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Tribal values are not democratic

Tribal values are not democratic | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it

David Ronfeldt, originator of the TIMN framework (Tribes + Institutions + Markets + Networks) has written a series of posts on what current political changes mean from this perspective. From a TIMN perspective, the reasons for ‘American exceptionalism’ lie mainly in our approach to the T form. We have welcomed immigrants and found ways to enable people from all backgrounds and orientations to live together. Trumpish tribalism will undermine that basis of American exceptionalism, especially if he and his cohorts claim to be restoring it.

David Hain's insight:

An interesting organisational take on Trump's 'divide and conquer' mindset and approach.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

organizing for the network era

organizing for the network era | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
The current organizational tyranny was a response to a linear, print-based world. These organizations are artifacts of a time when information was scarce and hard to share, and when connections with others were difficult to make and required command and control. The network era, with digital electric communications, changes this. Organizations today should be designed more like the internet: small pieces, loosely joined.

Last year I described several of my principles and models for the network era and showed how they related to each other. I would like to put these together in a coherent framework to show how we can design organizations for the network era, instead of ones optimized for markets, institutions, or tribes. The network era needs new structures, not modified versions of obsolete models.
David Hain's insight:

Networks and how to navigate/evolve them, by the excellent Harold Jarche!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Values and guidelines to transform our mechanistic worldview

Values and guidelines to transform our mechanistic worldview | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
We know our choices shape our world, but we rarely recognise that these choices are themselves shaped by our beliefs about the world. It is becoming increasingly clear that it is not technology, or the economy, or politics that presents us with the biggest challenge in creating a sustainable world, but escaping the trap of our present, mechanistic worldview. To quote Wendell Berry:
We have lived by the assumption that what was good for us would be good for the world. We have been wrong. We must change our lives, so that it will be possible to live by the contrary assumption that what is good for the world will be good for us. And that requires that we make the effort to know the world and learn what is good for it. We must learn to cooperate in its processes and to yield to its limits.
David Hain's insight:

Reframing our mental models about the world is critical to making a sustainable difference!

more...
Peter C. Newton-Evans's curator insight, June 14, 2017 10:22 AM
The old mechanistic worldview--coupled with deterministic thought--has chained up our capacity to change the world. These chains we must now break, before they break us.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Collaboration that Generates Results: 5 Articles with Interesting Tips

Collaboration that Generates Results: 5 Articles with Interesting Tips | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
In these times of relentless change, forcing even the best of companies to transform and future-proof themselves, the real challenge is: getting people to work together across company divisions and cultures in a way that generates results. Like increasing our agility and adaptability, attracting new customers with better services and products, taking better decisions, and solving problems customers genuinely care about.

Is there an ideal recipe, you might wonder? Is there a one-fits-all solution? Companies, challenges and people are way to diverse for one-fits-all solutions, and thank god for that – for wouldn’t life be boring if our actions and solutions were the same!

But there ARE some smart things you can do to improve the quality of cross-company collaboration and generate measurable results. Of all the interventions tested in the course of many years (and in various business settings), here is my personal top 4:
David Hain's insight:

Collaboration's risk-reward ratio is crucial, some good tips to improve it here!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Flat hierarchies: Just another step in the wrong direction

Flat hierarchies: Just another step in the wrong direction | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
So you better quit trying to make your company "flatter". In complexity, an organization must be federative - not flat. When outside markets rule, then it is the part of the organization that we call the periphery that earns the money. It is the periphery that learns from the market easiest. That can best adapt to and respond to markets - quickly and intelligently. In complexity, the center loses its information monopoly, its competence advantage: it can hardly issue any meaningful commands any more. The coupling between periphery and center must consequently be designed in a way that enables the organization to absorb and process market dynamics. For that, the periphery must steer the center through market-like mechanisms and own the monetary resources. Not the other way around. (But hey, the periphery earns the money anyways, right?)
David Hain's insight:

The case against hierarchies, convincingly made by Nils Pflaeging!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

We don’t need hero leaders, we need cultures of learning and leadership

We don’t need hero leaders, we need cultures of learning and leadership | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
“We have relied on hero’s for far too long, perhaps because it’s such an enticing promise.

Somewhere there is someone who will fix everything. Somewhere there is the perfect leader who will lead us out of this mess.

Somewhere, there is someone who is visionary, charismatic and brilliant and we will happily follow him or her.

Somewhere.

Well, it’s time for all the heroes to go home.

It is time for us to give up these hopes and expectations, that only serve to make people dependant and passive.

It is time to face the truth of our situation. We are all in this together.

Let’s figure out how to engage the hearts and minds of everyone, and get on with the work to do it.” — Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze
David Hain's insight:

It takes a village...and communities thrive on everyone taking responsibility...

more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 16, 2017 10:45 AM
The author, Ash Buchannan, makes the point that, living in community, we each have the opportunity to rise to the occasion and lead. He referenced Margaret Wheatley's work.

Too often in schools, there is desire amongst teachers to be told what they are to do. No one can lead our students for us, so how do we step up in a community of teaching, learning, and leading? To educate and pedagogy are about leading.
Scooped by David Hain
Scoop.it!

Breaking the silo mentality

Breaking the silo mentality | Collaborationweb | Scoop.it
With the very nature of work rapidly changing and continuously pivoting, business leaders can’t afford to not examine how silos may be limiting both the success of the business and their own impact as a leader.

Patrick Lencioni, author of Silos, Politics and Turf Wars describes how silos – ‘and the turf wars they enable devastate organsiations: They waste resources, kill productivity, push good people out the door and jeopardise the achievement of goals’. To overcome them he highlights the need for strong unified leadership that is prepared to look past the behaviours that result from silos and focus on the contextual issues that are often at the heart of the organisation.

While it can be very easy to assume that the inefficiencies and lack of collaboration in a team or organisation are a result of employees not knowing how to play nicely together, often the behaviours result from a sense of powerlessness to actually do anything about the problems they have identified. Leadership teams who recognise this and seek to create solutions that remove roadblocks, facilitate new ways of working and empower employees will create long-term solutions that are easy to execute and scalable.

David Hain's insight:

Silos need to be broken from executive team example!

more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 5, 2017 12:47 PM
Teachers experience these silos, as well. How do we spend time with each other, sharing what we do? Margot Anderson proposes three essential things to break through the silos: unify around a common vision, focus teaching around that common vision, and recognize what motivates teachers and students. This would appear to be easy enough in teaching, but I have been told by teachers and principals we do too much of that vision stuff. Embedded cultures are challenging to transform.
johanna krijnsen's curator insight, May 6, 2017 8:05 PM
To overcome silo mentality you need strong unified leadership
 
Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.