Cognitive Science
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Cognitive Science
news and sources for the interdisciplinary approach of cognition
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Willingness to lie manipulated with magnets

Willingness to lie manipulated with magnets | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Mo Costandi: Magnetic stimulation of the prefrontal cortex influences people's willingness to tell lies...

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The cerebellum as navigation assistant: A cognitive map enables orientation

The cerebellum as navigation assistant: A cognitive map enables orientation | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
The cerebellum is far more intensively involved in helping us navigate than previously thought. To move and learn effectively in spatial environments our brain, and particularly our hippocampus, creates a 'cognitive' map of the environment.
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Psychologist admits faking data in dozens of studies - science-in-society - 02 November 2011 - New Scientist

Psychologist admits faking data in dozens of studies - science-in-society - 02 November 2011 - New Scientist | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
I have failed as a scientist, says Diederik Stapel, after a report into allegations against him concludes that dozens of his papers contain fabricated data...
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Understanding emotions without language

Understanding emotions without language | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Does understanding emotions depend on the language we speak, or is our perception the same regardless of language and culture? According to a new study by researchers from the MPI for Psycholinguistics and the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology, you don't need to have words for emotions to understand them.


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The sum of your memories constitute who you are - What Is Alzheimer

The sum of your memories constitute who you are - What Is Alzheimer | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

The sum of your memories constitute who you are. Creating and storing memories is one of the brain's most remarkable functions, and takes place deep inside the brain, in the hippocampus. Along with the entorhinal cortex, the hippocampus collects input from the many parts of the brain that process what our five senses record, and links this information to our emotions (regulated by the amygdala) and the brain regions we use to think, plan, and move. This information arrives through the connections between neurons which create a living, dynamic framework for everything that we see, hear, taste, smell, touch and experience.


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Psychologists prove existence of hypnotic state

Psychologists prove existence of hypnotic state | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Researchers have come up with strong evidence to show that a genuine hypnotic state exists -- a glazed look often been linked with hypnosis but rarely studied scientifically.

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Language 50,000 BC: Our ancestors like Yoda spoke - life - 10 October 2011 - New Scientist

Language 50,000 BC: Our ancestors like Yoda spoke - life - 10 October 2011 - New Scientist | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Merritt Ruhlen of Stanford University in California, and Murray Gell-Mann, at the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico created a family tree for 2200 languages, living and dead, based on how they use similar sounds for the same meanings. Most modern languages use subject-verb-object sentences: "I see the dog", while most dead ones, such as Latin, go subject-object-verb – "I the dog see".


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» Why Do Some People Learn Faster?

» Why Do Some People Learn Faster? | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Do we ignore mistakes, brushing them aside for the sake of our self-confidence? Or do we investigate the errors, seeking to learn from the snafus? The latter approach, suggests a series of studies, could make you learn faster.
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Why Closing Your Eyes (and Disabling Other Senses) Can Help You Remember

Why Closing Your Eyes (and Disabling Other Senses) Can Help You Remember | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
When you try to remember something, chances are you look up and away or even close your eyes.
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Απόπειρα Πρωτόγονης Γραφής | Enet Διάλογοι

Απόπειρα Πρωτόγονης Γραφής | Enet Διάλογοι | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Η ανάλυση σημαδιών γύρω από τις ζωγραφιές πρωτόγονων στα σπήλαια της Γαλλίας υποδεικνύει ότι οι πρωτόγονοι χρησιμοποιούσαν ένα είδος συμβολικής γραφής, 30.000 χρόνια πριν.


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Social hierarchy prewired in the brain

Social hierarchy prewired in the brain | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

If you find yourself more of a follower than a social leader, it may something to do with the wiring in your brain. According to a new study in Science, researchers from the Chinese Academy of Science have discovered a location in the brain that is active in alpha mice but not in their subordinate cage mates.


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Habits form when brainwaves slow down - life - 26 September 2011 - New Scientist

Habits form when brainwaves slow down - life - 26 September 2011 - New Scientist | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Insight into brainwaves suggest it may be possible to boost the rate at which habits are learned...

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Researchers identify brain cells responsible for keeping us awake

Researchers identify brain cells responsible for keeping us awake | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Bright light arouses us. Bright light makes it easier to stay awake. Very bright light not only arouses us but is known to have antidepressant effects. Conversely, dark rooms can make us sleepy.
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The 'rich club' that rules your brain - life - 02 November 2011 - New Scientist

The 'rich club' that rules your brain - life - 02 November 2011 - New Scientist | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
An elite cabal of 12 well-connected neural hubs governs everything that happens in your brain...
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Daniel Wolpert: The real reason for brains | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Neuroscientist Daniel Wolpert starts from a surprising premise: the brain evolved, not to think or feel, but to control movement.

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Babies understand thought process of others at 10 months old

New research indicates that at 10 months, babies start to understand another person's thought process, providing new insights on how humans acquire knowledge and how communication develops.

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Scientists Measure Dream Content For The First Time

Scientists Measure Dream Content For The First Time | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
The ability to dream is a fascinating aspect of the human mind. However, how the images and emotions that we experience so intensively when we dream form in our heads remains a mystery.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Bilingualism Will Supercharge Your Baby’s Brain | Think Tank | Big Think

Bilingualism Will Supercharge Your Baby’s Brain  | Think Tank | Big Think | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
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Brain scans indicate that being bilingual can delay Alzheimer's symptoms

Brain scans indicate that being bilingual can delay Alzheimer's symptoms | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
TORONTO - A small study has found that people who speak more than one language have twice as much br... - Latest News - Winnipeg Free Press.
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Brain 'rejects negative thoughts'

Brain 'rejects negative thoughts' | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
One reason optimists retain a positive outlook on life despite all evidence to the contrary has been discovered, say researchers.
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How Handwriting Boosts the Brain

How Handwriting Boosts the Brain | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Recent research illustrates how writing by hand engages the brain in learning. And in an interesting twist, new technology is starting to reinvigorate this age-old practice.

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The Creative Brain On Exercise | Fast Company

The Creative Brain On Exercise | Fast Company | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
For more than thirty years, Haruki Murakami has dazzled the world with his beautifully crafted words, most often in the form of novels and short stories.

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How the Brain Appreciates Art | IdeaFeed | Big Think

How the Brain Appreciates Art | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Philosophers have long spoken of aesthetic appreciation as though it were a distinct faculty of the mind. On a certain level, it seems reasonable that we do not look at a burrito the same way we look at a Vermeer painting. But neuroimaging devices show that our approval or disapproval of something is processed by the same part of the brain. "The most reasonable evolutionary hypothesis is that the aesthetic system of the brain evolved first for the appraisal of objects of biological importance, including food sources and suitable mates, and was later co-opted for artworks such as paintings and music."


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