Coastal Management
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Risks of Global Warming : Land Ice Melting and Rising Sea Levels

What is happening to our planet? And what can we do about it? Read The Global Warming Reader http://goo.gl/IODci It provides more than thirty-five answers to...
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A video describing what we can do to protect our coastal areas from erosion.

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Storm protection against a rising sea could cost up to $100 trillion a year by 2100

Storm protection against a rising sea could cost up to $100 trillion a year by 2100 | Coastal Management | Scoop.it
New research predicts that coastal regions face massive increases in damages from storm surge flooding over the 21st century - to $100 trillion annually, more than the world's entire economic product today.

 

his staggering figure - more than the entire world's current Gross Domestic Product (GDP) - represents the upper end of the estimate that storm surges will cost between 0.3 and 9.3% of global GDP by 2100, taking into account expected GDP increases. But timely investments in coastal protection could cut that cost by more than 99.9%, the authors conclude.

 

The study - a comprehensive global simulation - led by the Berlin-based think-tank Global Climate Forum (GCF) and involving the University of Southampton, presents, for the first time, comprehensive global simulation results on future flood damages to buildings and infrastructure in coastal flood plains.

 

Drastic increases in these damages are expected due to both rising sea levels and population and economic growth in the coastal zone. Asia and Africa may be particularly hard hit because of their rapidly growing coastal mega-cities, such as Shanghai, Manila and Lagos.

"If we ignore this problem, the consequences will be dramatic", explains Jochen Hinkel from GCF and the study's lead author. In 2100, up to 600 million people - around 5% of the global population - could be affected by coastal flooding if no adaptation measures are put in place.

 

"Countries need to take action and invest in coastal protection measures, such as building or raising dikes, amongst other options", urges Hinkel.

 

 

With such protection measures, the projected damages could be reduced to below $80 billion per year during the 21st century. The researchers found that an investment level of $10 to $70 billion per year could achieve such a reduction.

 

 

Prompt action is needed most in Asia and Africa where large parts of the coastal population are already affected by storm surge flooding.

 

 

Meeting the challenge of adapting to rising sea levels will not be easy, explains Hinkel:"Poor countries and heavily impacted small-island states are not able to make the necessary investments alone, they need international support."

 

 

"If we do not reduce greenhouse gases swiftly and substantially, some regions will have to seriously consider relocating significant numbers of people in the longer run."

 

 

Adding to the challenge, international finance mechanisms have thus far proved sluggish in mobilising funds for adapting to climate change, as the debate on adaptation funding at the recent climate conference in Warsaw once again confirmed.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The consequences of human activities increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases are already being felt especially in marine environments.

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"Sandy Island" near Australia has vanished

http://conspiracythoerys.blogspot.co.uk/p/blog-page.html "Sandy Island" no longer exists, erm why's that then ? Was it a "nuclear" event that went too far or...
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During the 20th century, sea levels rose faster than in any other century during past 4,300 years

During the 20th century, sea levels rose faster  than in any other century during past 4,300 years | Coastal Management | Scoop.it

During the 20th century, sea levels along the highly populated U.S. Mid-Atlantic coastline between New York and Virginia rose faster than in any other century during the past 4,300 years, according to a new study. And as those sea levels continue to increase as a result of global warming and local land elevation changes, the risks of coastal flooding will dramatically escalate.

 

The study, by geoscientists at Rutgers and Tufts Universities and published in the new journal “Earth’s Future,” took a comprehensive look at the history of sea level in the Mid-Atlantic, combining sediment records of prehistoric sea level with modern data, which includes readings from tide gauges and satellite instruments. The result is one of the most in-depth examinations of past, present, and future sea level rise of any region in the U.S.

 

To put recent rates of sea level rise into historical perspective, the study found there is at least a 95 percent probability that the rate of sea level rise in the Mid-Atlantic during the 20th century was faster than any century in the past 4,300 years, and a 67 percent probability that it was faster than any century in more than 6,600 years.

 

“The sea level rise that we’re seeing now is very significant,” including in a “prehistoric context,” said study co-author Ben Horton of Rutgers University, in an interview.

 

Assuming continued groundwater extraction rates at coastal plain locations, those areas would see a greater amount of sea level rise, the study found. The study projected that those areas could be in for a rise of 9.8 inches by 2030, 1.5 feet by 2050, and about 3.5 feet, by 2100.

 

While the study shows that the main component of future sea level rise will be from global sea level rise, local land elevation changes should be factored into development decisions, since they will influence the rate and extent of relative sea level rise at the local level. The study noted that there are currently limited tools for policymakers to use to factor in sea level rise to the planning process.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Deanmignanelli's curator insight, July 15, 2014 10:40 PM

the sea levels have dramaticly risen the last couple of years

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Australian beach life under threat

For many Australians the beach is an important focus of daily life and around 70 per cent of the country's population lives on or near the coast. But rapid c...
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