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Why Women's Leadership is a Business Asset

Why Women's Leadership is a Business Asset | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Social science studies find that male bosses are more likely to judge the competence of women managers using a skewed view on gender. In practice, this means organisations are missing out on a proactive approach to leadership.

David Hain's insight:

Overview of gender bias in #leadership.

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Belinda MJ.B's curator insight, March 29, 2014 12:07 PM

#WomenLeadership What is your opinion on this? How do we utilize more of women leadership potential? #coaching

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The Ten Things You Need To Know To Lead Change Effectively

The Ten Things You Need To Know To Lead Change Effectively | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The fundamental role of leaders is to lead change, helping their teams and organisations to navigate the turbulent waters of a VUCA world.
It is accepted that change is now constant and all senior leaders need to develop strength in behaviours to help them lead change effectively.
But even the best of us, when faced with this constant change, will feel daunted and even overwhelmed. The good news is that it doesn’t need to be that way.
As with most things, breaking down the immensity of it all into smaller, more manageable chunks can make it better.
The same can be true of the behaviours needed to lead change.
To develop effective leadership behaviour that will help you, your people and the organisation through change, take a look at each of these ten things and score yourself on a scale of 1 to 5, where “1” is weak and “5” is strong:
David Hain's insight:

Kevin Watson on how you can easily assess your readiness to lead change.

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Kevin Watson's comment, July 23, 7:27 AM
Thanks for sharing, David. Most appreciated :)
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 24, 12:36 PM

Interesting point of view.  What do you think?

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We don’t need better leaders

We don’t need better leaders | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Why is everyone so hung up on Leaders, Leadership and Leadership courses – it’s what gets us into a mess. Think banking, politics, sport…” —Donald Clark

If all you have is a hammer, then every problem looks like a nail. If all you know is hierarchical leadership by virtue of one’s position, then all solutions are in the hands of the CEO. Conversations with 150 CEO’s only yield ‘CEO thinking’.

To raise the organization’s confidence in their decisions, leaders must carefully balance the various personal paradoxes involved in the decision-making process, including:

doubt – anxiety versus fearlessness, omniscience versus ignorance;
conviction – openness versus self-sufficiency, hubris versus humility;
realism – realistic optimism, i.e., pragmatism, versus blind optimism, i.e., gambling; and
patience – the right pacing or timing of decisions versus detrimental haste and hesitation.”

The great man theory of leadership is outdated, just as the divine right of kings was two centuries ago. Even the World Economic Forum thinks in terms of leadership as an individual achievement

David Hain's insight:

Uncommon sense about leadership in the network age from @HJarche!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 12:28 PM

While I agree with this in principle I still come back to my definition that everyone is a leader at some level so leadership mentality is still required.  However toxic and selfish leadership does need to be abolished in favor of open, transparent, compassionate, and trustworthy leadership. Adaptable leaders will, if they are smart, build & empower matrixed organizations.

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Unleashing the power of agile teams | McKinsey

Unleashing the power of agile teams | McKinsey | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
This article explores how senior leaders can unleash their companies’ full potential by empowering small teams and supporting their managers, whose roles have been redefined by agile thinking (exhibit). Let’s start with a glimpse of what that looks like in action.
David Hain's insight:

Ways to empower teams to become less hierarchical and more sustainable.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 19, 12:30 PM

Great concept from McKinsey, thanks for sharing David Hain.

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You Are Way Too Busy; It's Hampering Your Ability To Think And Be Productive

You Are Way Too Busy; It's Hampering Your Ability To Think And Be Productive | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The busyness crisis forces our brains into a different way of behaving. Most notably we believe multitasking is the way in which to dig us out of the being overly busy hole. The short answer is that it doesn’t work. A 2015 study with judges from Milan covering nearly 60,000 cases, for example, found that those who took on more than one case at a time ended up taking longer than if they focused on one. On the topic of multitasking author, Kimberly Himes writes, “research suggests that ‘multitasking, which many have embraced as the key to success, is instead a formula for shoddy work, mismanaged time, rote solutions, stress, and forgetfulness.’”
David Hain's insight:

Dan Pontefract on the consequences of not taking control our time - it doesn't end well!

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Leadership and Support | Unfolding Leadership

Leadership and Support | Unfolding Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
This kind of genuine support sometimes seems in low supply these days. In part this may be because it requires that you have something inside yourself to give, that you yourself are not empty, depressed or emotionally needy in ways you’d prefer to ignore. My sense is that the good stuff, the really good stuff comes through you to the other person without actually having that much to do with you. In the best circumstances, where there is selfless affirmation and “seeing” of another, you might feel like a conduit for help that comes from a higher source. You might feel honored and proud to be that conduit, but needing to take credit as a rescuer leaves you only one step away from becoming a persecutor or victim.
David Hain's insight:

Dan Oestreich's blog is a constant source of leadership wisdom and inspiration. Here is another example of many. @DanOestreich, www.unfoldingleadership.com

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 13, 10:22 AM

Authentic support is extremely hard to find in business today. Time for a shift in that mentality.

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Leaders: It’s OK to not know everything 

Leaders: It’s OK to not know everything  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Disruptive times call for transformational leaders to let go and become more complex themselves to navigate effectively. Little attention has been paid to the cognitive and emotional load that dynamic change creates for leaders. It’s an especially onerous burden, because the very nature of disruption means that leaders must steer their organizations into – and through – a fog of uncertainty.

It’s increasingly clear that to “do” agile, you must “be” agile. How do you do that? By growing more complex ourselves. To do that requires building a bigger inner self so complexity feels simpler and allows us to move with greater purpose, clarity, inner calm and impact. Instead of getting frustrated with all the challenges or with ourselves and our habits, it pays to make the habit your friend.

In our experience, these five personal practices can contribute meaningfully to the mindset required to lead effectively in transformative times. They serve as building blocks of personal inner agility:
David Hain's insight:

If we are being our authentic selves, we admit to what we don't know. Why should it be different in a leadership role? Apart from the unlikeliness of knowing everything, people spot faking in a heartbeat!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 11, 6:47 PM
Leaders: It’s OK to not know everything
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 13, 10:27 AM

Absolutely a factor. This is why I suggest a adaptive leadership style to handle the VUCCA world we live in today.

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How Women Can Succeed by Rethinking Old Habits

How Women Can Succeed by Rethinking Old Habits | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Everyone has self-limiting behaviors; this is simply part of being human. But our combined six decades of professional experience coaching and working with women in virtually every sector have taught us that even women at the highest levels can undermine themselves with specific self-sabotaging behaviors that are different from those that most frequently undermine men.
David Hain's insight:

How strengths can undermine us, plus a process to do something about it. Written about women, but the process is universally applicable.

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3 Transitions Even the Best Leaders Struggle With

3 Transitions Even the Best Leaders Struggle With | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The capacity for reinvention is the single-most-important career attribute for executives today. Successful reinvention may look different for each of us, but if we do not attempt it, we are sure to fail.
David Hain's insight:

Career and business transitions are a bit like points on a rail track - dangerous zones of possible derailment!

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Increase the Effectiveness of Your Executive Team

Increase the Effectiveness of Your Executive Team | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Executive teams play 2 critical roles in an organization.

The first is obvious — they provide strategic and operational leadership to the company. They set goals, develop strategy, and ensure the strategy is executed effectively.

The second is less obvious, but just as important — the executive team provides the organizational and cultural DNA for the company. How well the executive team functions as a collective leadership body and how its members interact serves as the model that teams throughout the company will follow.

You could fill entire libraries with the books and studies written about strategy and operations. The second role of the executive team, though, gets less press. Because it receives relatively little attention, team effectiveness can be the basis of a significant competitive advantage for companies.

David Hain's insight:

The fish rots from the head - but it also thrives from the head. So it makes sense to engage in some 'marine biology' with your executive team to ensure the latter outcome!

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The Top 6 Leadership Challenges Around the World

The Top 6 Leadership Challenges Around the World | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What’s most challenging about leading organizations today? And do the challenges differ around the world?

Our researchers went straight to the source to answer these questions, gathering input from 763 middle- and executive-level leaders in organizations from China/Hong Kong, Egypt, India, Singapore, the U.K., the U.S., and Spain.

Our study found these leaders consistently face the same 6 challenges — even if they describe their challenges and specific context in different ways:
David Hain's insight:

Today's main leadership challenges, as polled by the Centre for Creative Leadership.

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The Power of Inspiration, Perspiration, and Cooperation—in Sports and in Business

The Power of Inspiration, Perspiration, and Cooperation—in Sports and in Business | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Why do great things happen so seldom or so fleetingly at so many large organizations? One major reason is that most organizations still rely on outmoded management theories born of the assembly line. These theories were developed in a simpler time when most work was rote and precision was more important to organizational success than critical thinking. They assume that people are the weak link and need to be controlled through rules (the “hard” approach) or through team-building activities such as offsite retreats, affiliation events, and even lunchtime yoga classes designed to foster camaraderie (the “soft” approach).

These approaches to management may have been effective when most work was algorithmic—routine—based on following a set of rules. But thanks to increasing competition, globalization, digitization, and regulation, today’s economy is far more complex. Business problems have become more dynamic, and ambiguity and uncertainty have grown. Work has become heuristic, an exercise in problem solving requiring intelligent judgments and the resolution of often contradictory requirements.

David Hain's insight:

Nice case study on winning teams.

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Leadership (n.): Capacity to lead – The Startup –


According to Joe Iarocci from Brown University, in October 2015 Amazon offered 57,136 books with the word “leadership” in the title. According to the statistics he looked into, 4 new books on leadership are published everyday! He thinks there are 5 reasons behind the huge number of leadership books:

 

  • Many people feel free to offer opinions on leadership
  • Readers have many different tastes in leadership books
  • Anyone can publish a leadership book.
  • The practice of leadership is constantly evolving.
  • There is no limit to the way leadership can be described.
David Hain's insight:

Leadership - easy to say (and write about), difficult to define meaningfully...

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4 Tips for Navigating Ambiguity

4 Tips for Navigating Ambiguity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Ambiguity makes people feel uncomfortable—it’s a fear amplifier. The pace of change is fast, disruption is coming from many directions, and what worked in the past just doesn’t work anymore. New technologies, global competition, radical changes in long-standing business models, and policy shifts are rampant. Meanwhile, the challenges we face in every direction—healthcare, education, financial and beyond—are more complicated than ever before. And yet, you can’t plan your way forward the way you could in the past.

When navigating ambiguity, instead of a finite plan, you’re choreographing moments where people come together to make progress. It’s about guiding people through the process even though you don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s about having the right people together at the right time, not necessarily the “right” answer.5 And crafting the space for your team to explore and build (rather than plan) the path ahead. You need to create the contexts and conditions for your team to evolve as the world changes. Innovation is the unexpected and the breakthrough. How do you sight it on the horizon? 
David Hain's insight:

IDEO on sailing the waters of ambiguity - a necessary if not always  sufficient condition for success today.

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An executive’s guide to AI | McKinsey & Company

An executive’s guide to AI | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
To stay at the forefront of the accelerating artificial-intelligence race, business executives can study up on the ABCs of AI using this interactive.
David Hain's insight:

It's coming, like it or not! Better get to understand AI rather than be caught by it. Excellent 101 here.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 29, 11:05 AM

Some great insights for those who lack the AI knowledge.

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How can business leaders make the new world of work better for people?

How can business leaders make the new world of work better for people? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How can CEOs stay ahead of the curve in training and developing their workforces for using automation and artificial intelligence (AI)? Since companies are doing the hiring and creating the jobs, what role do they play in talent and development? How should companies think about hiring as work changes?

In this episode of the New World of Work podcast, McKinsey Global Institute director James Manyika speaks with two leaders on the forefront of applying AI techniques, such as automation and machine learning, in the business world. John Donahoe, president and CEO of ServiceNow, and Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn, tackle the tough questions facing companies today.
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Memo to the CEO: Are you the source of workplace dysfunction? 

We human beings have a penchant for denial and delusion. We’re often clueless about our flaws, and when we do admit shortcomings, we underestimate their severity and negative impact. Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman believes the curse of overconfidence is the most destructive of human biases. We are prone to developing distorted and overly positive self-images—and to deny, disregard, or never notice negative information about ourselves. For most of us, coming to grips with when we act like jerks, or encourage others to do so, requires overcoming some mighty potent predilections.
David Hain's insight:

The jerk factor! It's apparently not so difficult to become one...

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Frans de Waal: The surprising science of alpha males | TED Talk

Frans de Waal: The surprising science of alpha males | TED Talk | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In this fascinating look at the "alpha male," primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males -- generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping -- and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. "Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male," de Waal says.
David Hain's insight:

Maybe we've been misjudging our use of the term 'alpha male'?

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Crises, Tea Bags, and Opportunity

Crises, Tea Bags, and Opportunity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When times are good, leaders live on easy street. If the economy and the firm is booming, you can let the good times roll. You can take your followers to a better place by simply riding the crest of the wave.
As ever, the real test of leadership is when times are hard. In this respect, leaders are like tea bags: you only know how good they are when you put them in hot water. There are two ways leaders can fail the tea bag test.

David Hain's insight:

Jo Owen on why leaders are like tea bags - worth a 2 minute read!

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Harvard study: What CEOs do all day

Harvard study: What CEOs do all day | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
So what are the chief executives actually doing with their day?

The study found that a CEO's work is diverse: 25 percent of their work is spent on people and relationships, 25 percent on functional and business unit reviews, 16 percent on organization and culture, and 21 percent on strategy. Only 3 percent of their work is spent on professional development, and only 1 percent on crisis management. Meanwhile, 4 percent of their work is on mergers and acquisitions, while another 4 percent is spent on operating plans.

And even CEOs are plagued by not-so-efficient meetings.
David Hain's insight:

Ever wondered what your CEO is actually doing? This study breaks down their time spent.

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How Humble Leadership Really Works

How Humble Leadership Really Works | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Servant-leaders have the humility, courage, and insight to admit that they can benefit from the expertise of others who have less power than them. They actively seek the ideas and unique contributions of the employees that they serve. This is how servant leaders create a culture of learning, and an atmosphere that encourages followers to become the very best they can.

Humility and servant leadership do not imply that leaders have low self-esteem, or take on an attitude of servility. Instead, servant leadership emphasizes that the responsibility of a leader is to increase the ownership, autonomy, and responsibility of followers — to encourage them to think for themselves and try out their own ideas.

Here’s how to do it.

David Hain's insight:

They call it servant leadership, but it seems to me it's really just being a good human who accepts leadership responsibility!

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 11, 7:03 PM
How Humble Leadership Really Works
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From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader

From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The way that we typically think about the effect of asking questions—especially when we are in leadership positions—is just plain wrong.  We fear that others will judge us negatively for not having all the answers, when in truth it’s just the opposite. When we interact with others by asking questions, our relationships grow stronger, because we are showing genuine interest in learning about them, hearing their ideas, and getting to know them more personally. As a result, we gain their trust, and our relationship becomes more interesting and intimate. If you are worried that by asking a question you may come across as incompetent, you have that wrong also: People think of us as being smarter when we ask questions than when we don’t.
David Hain's insight:

I am so lucky that people pay me to ask 'stupid' questions in my work! There are many variations of "The Emperor's New Clothes" out there. Asking why is one simple way to surface them.

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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, July 11, 7:04 PM
From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader
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The 2 Cs of management excellence  

The 2 Cs of management excellence   | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What is good management? For years at McKinsey, we have applied science and measurement to that question. Our research has found significant approaches to achieve superior management that spark notable organizational performance and health. They underscore the importance of consistency and coherence, the top characteristics of “good management” in my book.

It is tempting to look at an article on the cover of Businessweek or Fortune touting the latest fad and declare, “I want that.” However, that can be a big mistake – not because the ideas don’t have substance, but because they may not be consistent and coherent with the other elements of your organization’s management “recipe.”

As leadership authority John C. Maxwell opines, “If your people know what they can expect from you, they will continue to look to you for leadership.”
David Hain's insight:

Consistency and coherence top of the list for managers, says McKinsey.

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Three Questions to Help You Become a “Yes, And” Leader

Three Questions to Help You Become a “Yes, And” Leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Approach every conversation as an opportunity to improvise. For more insight, read “Using Improv to Transform How You Lead.”
David Hain's insight:

Nice memory jogger about the right kind of questions for leaders to ask.

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Whitney Johnson on Building an A-Team | Jesse Lyn Stoner

Whitney Johnson on Building an A-Team | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I had the pleasure of interviewing Whitney Johnson, author of the new book Build an A Team: Play to Their Strengths and Lead the Up the Learning Curve. Whitney has done ground-breaking work in the arena of personal disruption – applying these concepts to individuals, not just organizations.
I read Whitney’s new book Build an A Team with interest because it’s a natural progression of the work she been doing with personal disruption and career disruption. In her last two books she showed how disruption applies to individuals and in their careers. Her new book shows how managers can use these ideas to develop their team.
I am delighted to share our conversation in a unique format – a combination of written and audio. I hope you enjoy what Whitney has to say as much as I did.
David Hain's insight:

Whitney Johnson and Jesse Lynn Stoner talk teams - with predictably useful results!

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5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations

5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
According to the 2015 Employee Trends Report by Quantum Workplace, one of the biggest areas of concern for team members is that there is often not open and honest communication with managers.  So why is this? Why does miscommunication pervade at least 50% of business conversations? Is technology to blame or are there some other dynamics at work.

In my experience, yes technology does have a part to play. Emails and text can be taken out of context and without any supporting body language to back up the conversation they can fuel anxiety and in some cases, escalate beyond repair, this is why face to face conversations are so much more effective.

And yet face to face conversations too can lead to miscommunication especially when the manager fails to lead the conversation or is fearful about discussing the subject. Take for example if a manager needs to have a difficult conversation with team members, say about their performance. If the manager is not feeling confident in having the conversation they might not articulate clearly the problem and so the team member leaves confused about what they have done wrong. This then causes the situation to escalate and before long both parties become frustrated. I call these conversations Courageous Conversations as they require the manager to be ruthlessly honest and transparent, often saying things that no-one has said in the past.

Having a clear framework for navigating these Courageous Conversations is essential to help managers approach the situation with confidence and certainty. This is why I developed the 6 C’s to Successful Courageous Conversations Framework.
David Hain's insight:

Useful framework for putting the fish on the table! if you don't, you may soon notice a funny smell getting in the way of productivity...

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.