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Imagining a Different World for Women

Imagining a Different World for Women | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Can you imagine living in a world where extreme religious laws that inhibit the movements and rights of women and girls simply couldn't exist?
Can you see us living in a place where women and girls have full control of their own bodies?
David Hain's insight:

You can do it if you try...

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Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
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Memo to the CEO: Are you the source of workplace dysfunction? 

We human beings have a penchant for denial and delusion. We’re often clueless about our flaws, and when we do admit shortcomings, we underestimate their severity and negative impact. Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman believes the curse of overconfidence is the most destructive of human biases. We are prone to developing distorted and overly positive self-images—and to deny, disregard, or never notice negative information about ourselves. For most of us, coming to grips with when we act like jerks, or encourage others to do so, requires overcoming some mighty potent predilections.
David Hain's insight:

The jerk factor! It's apparently not so difficult to become one...

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Frans de Waal: The surprising science of alpha males | TED Talk

Frans de Waal: The surprising science of alpha males | TED Talk | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In this fascinating look at the "alpha male," primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males -- generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping -- and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. "Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male," de Waal says.
David Hain's insight:

Maybe we've been misjudging our use of the term 'alpha male'?

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Crises, Tea Bags, and Opportunity

Crises, Tea Bags, and Opportunity | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When times are good, leaders live on easy street. If the economy and the firm is booming, you can let the good times roll. You can take your followers to a better place by simply riding the crest of the wave.
As ever, the real test of leadership is when times are hard. In this respect, leaders are like tea bags: you only know how good they are when you put them in hot water. There are two ways leaders can fail the tea bag test.

David Hain's insight:

Jo Owen on why leaders are like tea bags - worth a 2 minute read!

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Harvard study: What CEOs do all day

Harvard study: What CEOs do all day | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
So what are the chief executives actually doing with their day?

The study found that a CEO's work is diverse: 25 percent of their work is spent on people and relationships, 25 percent on functional and business unit reviews, 16 percent on organization and culture, and 21 percent on strategy. Only 3 percent of their work is spent on professional development, and only 1 percent on crisis management. Meanwhile, 4 percent of their work is on mergers and acquisitions, while another 4 percent is spent on operating plans.

And even CEOs are plagued by not-so-efficient meetings.
David Hain's insight:

Ever wondered what your CEO is actually doing? This study breaks down their time spent.

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How Humble Leadership Really Works

How Humble Leadership Really Works | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Servant-leaders have the humility, courage, and insight to admit that they can benefit from the expertise of others who have less power than them. They actively seek the ideas and unique contributions of the employees that they serve. This is how servant leaders create a culture of learning, and an atmosphere that encourages followers to become the very best they can.

Humility and servant leadership do not imply that leaders have low self-esteem, or take on an attitude of servility. Instead, servant leadership emphasizes that the responsibility of a leader is to increase the ownership, autonomy, and responsibility of followers — to encourage them to think for themselves and try out their own ideas.

Here’s how to do it.

David Hain's insight:

They call it servant leadership, but it seems to me it's really just being a good human who accepts leadership responsibility!

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From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader

From Pink Milk to Smart Questions, How to Be a Rebel Leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The way that we typically think about the effect of asking questions—especially when we are in leadership positions—is just plain wrong.  We fear that others will judge us negatively for not having all the answers, when in truth it’s just the opposite. When we interact with others by asking questions, our relationships grow stronger, because we are showing genuine interest in learning about them, hearing their ideas, and getting to know them more personally. As a result, we gain their trust, and our relationship becomes more interesting and intimate. If you are worried that by asking a question you may come across as incompetent, you have that wrong also: People think of us as being smarter when we ask questions than when we don’t.
David Hain's insight:

I am so lucky that people pay me to ask 'stupid' questions in my work! There are many variations of "The Emperor's New Clothes" out there. Asking why is one simple way to surface them.

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The 2 Cs of management excellence  

The 2 Cs of management excellence   | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What is good management? For years at McKinsey, we have applied science and measurement to that question. Our research has found significant approaches to achieve superior management that spark notable organizational performance and health. They underscore the importance of consistency and coherence, the top characteristics of “good management” in my book.

It is tempting to look at an article on the cover of Businessweek or Fortune touting the latest fad and declare, “I want that.” However, that can be a big mistake – not because the ideas don’t have substance, but because they may not be consistent and coherent with the other elements of your organization’s management “recipe.”

As leadership authority John C. Maxwell opines, “If your people know what they can expect from you, they will continue to look to you for leadership.”
David Hain's insight:

Consistency and coherence top of the list for managers, says McKinsey.

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Three Questions to Help You Become a “Yes, And” Leader

Three Questions to Help You Become a “Yes, And” Leader | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Approach every conversation as an opportunity to improvise. For more insight, read “Using Improv to Transform How You Lead.”
David Hain's insight:

Nice memory jogger about the right kind of questions for leaders to ask.

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Whitney Johnson on Building an A-Team | Jesse Lyn Stoner

Whitney Johnson on Building an A-Team | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
I had the pleasure of interviewing Whitney Johnson, author of the new book Build an A Team: Play to Their Strengths and Lead the Up the Learning Curve. Whitney has done ground-breaking work in the arena of personal disruption – applying these concepts to individuals, not just organizations.
I read Whitney’s new book Build an A Team with interest because it’s a natural progression of the work she been doing with personal disruption and career disruption. In her last two books she showed how disruption applies to individuals and in their careers. Her new book shows how managers can use these ideas to develop their team.
I am delighted to share our conversation in a unique format – a combination of written and audio. I hope you enjoy what Whitney has to say as much as I did.
David Hain's insight:

Whitney Johnson and Jesse Lynn Stoner talk teams - with predictably useful results!

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5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations

5 Steps To Having Courageous Conversations | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
According to the 2015 Employee Trends Report by Quantum Workplace, one of the biggest areas of concern for team members is that there is often not open and honest communication with managers.  So why is this? Why does miscommunication pervade at least 50% of business conversations? Is technology to blame or are there some other dynamics at work.

In my experience, yes technology does have a part to play. Emails and text can be taken out of context and without any supporting body language to back up the conversation they can fuel anxiety and in some cases, escalate beyond repair, this is why face to face conversations are so much more effective.

And yet face to face conversations too can lead to miscommunication especially when the manager fails to lead the conversation or is fearful about discussing the subject. Take for example if a manager needs to have a difficult conversation with team members, say about their performance. If the manager is not feeling confident in having the conversation they might not articulate clearly the problem and so the team member leaves confused about what they have done wrong. This then causes the situation to escalate and before long both parties become frustrated. I call these conversations Courageous Conversations as they require the manager to be ruthlessly honest and transparent, often saying things that no-one has said in the past.

Having a clear framework for navigating these Courageous Conversations is essential to help managers approach the situation with confidence and certainty. This is why I developed the 6 C’s to Successful Courageous Conversations Framework.
David Hain's insight:

Useful framework for putting the fish on the table! if you don't, you may soon notice a funny smell getting in the way of productivity...

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Inclusive Leadership Boosts Organizational Performance

Inclusive Leadership Boosts Organizational Performance | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Inclusive leadership focuses on creating a culture where differences are valued and appreciated, contrasting opinions and perspectives are encouraged and employees have a sense of both uniqueness and belonging. Research has shown that organizations with leaders that facilitate inclusive cultures tend to have employees who contribute more, stay longer, make better decisions, collaborate more effectively, perform better and are more engaged, innovative and motivated.
Organizations that have inclusive cultures are also twice as likely to meet or exceed their financial target, as well as six times more likely to be innovative and anticipate change, according to Bersin’s 2017 research on building an inclusive culture.

Our recent research further supports the notion that inclusive leadership increases an inclusive culture, as well as the notion that diversity does not always lead to inclusion. Through a survey of employees from 156 of the 250 organizations on the Forbes “America’s Best Employers for Diversity” list, we found that inclusive leadership highly correlated with inclusive culture.
David Hain's insight:

Don't just tick the box on inclusion, there's a big bottom line benefit on offer for leaders who live it out!

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Complexity inside and out – Benefit Mindset –

Preparing ourselves for the century of complexity - to best navigate our future possibilities in a complex world, it’s vital to consider the interplay between complexity in our inner lives and the complexity of our contexts.


These insights have some profound implications for 21st century education and 21st century leadership. It makes me wonder what would be possible if we had a whole generation of leaders with the context tools and the complexity of mind to navigate the great complex challenges of our day.

David Hain's insight:

Excellent short article from Ash Buchanan on how we can train ourselves to better navigate the seemingly un-navigable! Includes two excellent frameworks for sensemaking!

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The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership

The Neuroscience of Strategic Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Have you ever had a difficult executive decision to make? This is the kind of decision where the best options aren’t obvious, the ethics aren’t clear, and the consequences could affect hundreds of people or more. How do you figure out the right thing to do? More importantly, how do you develop the habit of making better decisions, time and time again, even in difficult and uncertain circumstances?

Neuroscientists and psychologists are beginning to learn what happens at moments of choice inside the human mind (the locus of mental activity) and the brain (the physical organ associated with that activity). If you understand these dynamics and how they affect you and those around you, you can set a course toward more effective patterns of thinking and action. You can replicate those beneficial patterns, at a larger scale, in your organization. Over time, this practice can help you take on a quality of strategic leadership: inspiring others, helping organizations transcend their limits, and navigating enterprises toward lofty, beneficial goals.
David Hain's insight:

How strategic leaders use their brain - if they choose to...

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How Howard Schultz’s Angel Poised Starbucks for Success

How Howard Schultz’s Angel Poised Starbucks for Success | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Starbucks has an angel on one shoulder and a devil on the other.

The angel works to guide Starbucks toward its better instincts: to retain the vision that impresario Howard Schultz had of re-creating a European café for an American (and now a worldwide) clientele, a “third place” that’s neither work nor home, where you can take your time, and where you pay more for coffee than you would at the deli down the street.

On the other shoulder, a devil whispers of the temptations of growth. The desire to grow pulls Starbucks, and all companies, toward the logic of scale — repeatability, robust processes, efficiency, speed. Growth in and of itself is a good thing; but it can go wrong if growth and scale come at the expense of vision, identity, or customer experience.

Few companies have resolved the tension between identity and growth as successfully as Starbucks. So as Schultz prepares to leaves the CEO post to head up the company’s new, ultra-upscale Starbucks Reserve venture, it’s worth reflecting on what he has accomplished — not just for coffee drinkers but for business thinkers — and why his vision can endure beyond his tenure.
David Hain's insight:

Interesting take on Howard Schultz's legacy, and how he resolved and balanced some of the temptations of leaders.

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Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process

Feedforward: How to Revitalize Your Feedback Process | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Take the fear out of feedback with Feedforward


Feed forward. It’s an alternative approach to traditional feedback designed to deliver constructive feedback focusing on a person’s development in the future. Feedback, by its very name, examines the past, which cannot be altered. Feedforward, by contrast, looks ahead at a future potential that is conceivably within our control. Feedback carries judgment and opinion; Feedforward is about people and their development. It’s a positive, future-focused, personal development process that, if used with conventional feedback, can minimize apprehensions or reactions to the latter’s delivery, such as hurt feelings, dissent, friction, and so on.

David Hain's insight:

Feedforward - worth considering as a development technique. Exercise example here.

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The leadership journey of Abraham Lincoln | McKinsey & Company

The leadership journey of Abraham Lincoln | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Many years ago, I made a short film for the Harvard Business School about the lessons that Abraham Lincoln’s life offered for modern leaders. I interviewed a range of CEOs, asking them what they’d learned from the 16th president. Their responses were wide-ranging and profound; many continue to influence my work on leadership.

I was particularly struck by what A. G. Lafley, CEO of Procter & Gamble at the time, said about how leaders are made. He pointed to three main ingredients. The first is an individual’s strengths and weaknesses and the cumulative experience a person acquires walking his or her path. The second is that an individual recognizes a moment has arrived that demands his or her leadership. The third is that the individual has to consciously decide “to embrace the cause and get in the game.”

Making oneself into a courageous leader, in the way Lafley describes, is perilous, compelling, and exhausting work. It also is some of the most satisfying one can do, and it could not be more important today. Like the turbulent Civil War that Lincoln found himself at the center of, the early 21st century cries out for effective, decent leaders. People of purpose and commitment who want to make a positive difference and who choose to rise: first within themselves, by claiming their better selves, and then on the larger stage, by staking out the higher ground.

Abraham Lincoln has something to offer each of us right now as we try to craft lives of purpose, dignity, and impact. Are you ready to hear the call to action contained in his story?
David Hain's insight:

The compelling story of Abe Lincolns leadership voyage, with useful lessons drawn for today's leaders.

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Optimism and Trust on the CEO’s Mind

Optimism and Trust on the CEO’s Mind | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When asked about the obligations associated with trustworthiness, the majority of CEOs voiced a sense of responsibility. They feel a growing expectation from their stakeholders that they should speak up on behalf of the overall health of the economy, the importance of diversity within their companies, and other social and environmental issues. Moreover, 59 percent said they experienced pressure to hold individual leaders accountable for misconduct. This was the second-most prevalent pressure they felt, only one percentage point behind the pressure for short-term financial results. In the third-most prevalent answer, 38 percent of the CEOs around the world said that they were experiencing pressure from employees and customers to take social or political stances. These pressures were felt much more strongly than, say, concerns about the dwindling tenures of chief executives themselves (only 22 percent).
David Hain's insight:

Edelman says trust in business is declining, but CEOs are optimistic, beginning to take responsibility for greater social responsibility.

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How Women Can Succeed by Rethinking Old Habits

How Women Can Succeed by Rethinking Old Habits | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
To let go of a behavior that is no longer serving you, you need first to recognize it as a habit. You need to bring it to conscious awareness so you can begin to try out new responses and see if they get you different results. This can feel awkward and even dangerous. It can make you feel vulnerable, foolish, and exposed. But we have seen it work — thousands of times. When it does, it unleashes energy and confidence. And that energy makes it easier to stay with the effort.
David Hain's insight:

This extract is written for women, but the advice on getting rid of unhelpful habits is universal.

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How to Make Room in Your Work Life for the Rest of Your Self

How to Make Room in Your Work Life for the Rest of Your Self | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
To be effective in today’s workplace, we need to shift our mindset and actions from managing oneself to managing one’s portfolio of selves. Doing so may initially increase the chaos, but once we fully embrace our complexity, we can feel more fulfilled and create more sustainable and agile organizations and communities.
David Hain's insight:

We all play numerous roles - sometimes they can get out of kilter, with negative results for us and those we love. Lots of ideas here to help manage our multiple identities more effectively.

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A Historic Shift in Expecting Leaders to Understand and Evolve Culture

A Historic Shift in Expecting Leaders to Understand and Evolve Culture | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
You will not find anything more difficult, rewarding, and sustainable as a leader than evolving your culture with intent. It is possible to unlock the power of culture for good! Brené Brown had an excellent quote in her book, Braving the Wilderness:

If leaders really want people to show up, speak out, take chances and innovate, we have to create cultures where people feel safe—where their belonging is not threatened by speaking out and they are supported when they make decisions to brave the wilderness, stand-alone, and speak truth to bullshit. -Brené Brown

Organizations and industries still have the opportunity to determine how they should assess, measure, monitor, and manage their cultures. If they don’t do so, it will be a matter of time until their leaders are viewed as financially and morally negligent, and serious consequences are likely to continue and possibly increase in frequency and severity. As importantly, however, the standards, tools, procedures, and regulations for assessing and managing their cultures are going to be externally imposed and may be bureaucratic, ineffective, and wasteful—as well as difficult to change and improve in ways that actually solve the problems at hand.

Yes, it is possible to unlock the power of culture for good and we all have a role to play in making this happen. Each one of us should reflect on our responsibilities in that journey and whether we are constructively influencing culture in a way that aligns with our personal and shared values. This can be an invaluable first step in connecting personal transformation to culture transformation.
David Hain's insight:

Excellent article from Human Synergistics on how Uber, Weinstein and Michigan gymnastics have lessons for all leaders. Plus a bonus 12 question assessment on whether your organisation is vulnerable.

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Women CEOs Speak: The Podcast Series

Women CEOs Speak: The Podcast Series | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
There is a yawning gender gap in Corporate America. Women make up 45% of the S&P 500’s workforce and they are CEOs at only 5% of those S&P 500 firms. Studies show that companies with disproportionately low numbers of women in leadership do not perform as well as those with a more balanced gender ratio. For years, boards have vowed to change that formula, yet still it remains.

Korn Ferry partnered with the Rockefeller Foundation in a research project. 57 women CEOs were interviewed, some of whom led Fortune 500 companies, some privately held, and some Fortune 1000. With the ultimate goal of having 100 women CEOs of Fortune 500 companies by 2025, the study has gained international attention.

In the first installment of a new six-part podcast series, “Women CEOs Speak,” Evelyn Orr, chief operating officer for the Korn Ferry Institute, and Jane Stevenson, global leader for CEO Succession, dissect what we learned from conducting this fascinating research. Part 1, “Women CEOs Speak: Research Foundations,” looks at common qualities shared by the women who became CEO. Look for future episodes focusing on other critical issues, including how organizations can tap into 100% of their talent pool, how women can advance their careers, the pivotal roles of mentors, and the strategies to deal with sexism in the workplace.  
David Hain's insight:

Only 5% of women in the S&P 500 make CEO. It makes sense, therefore to review what made them successful. Korn Ferry Research findings here.

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Why People Don't Notice You've Changed | Jesse Lyn Stoner

Why People Don't Notice You've Changed | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Often in coaching, managers work on changing their behaviors. But there’s another area you need to pay attention to also – other’s perceptions of you. Or you can end up in a situation where people don’t notice you’ve changed – where you’ve become a butterfly, but others still see a caterpillar.
David Hain's insight:

You've had feedback, been coached, want to change. Some thoughts from @JesseLynnStoner on how you can help others to help you...

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Putting talent at the top of the CEO agenda

Putting talent at the top of the CEO agenda | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
One of the questions I ask, particularly CEOs, is, “If there are three things that you could teach your younger self, what would they be?” What I’ve found consistently across countries and sectors is that CEOs say, “I would have spent more time on people. I would have removed people faster. I would have pulled people up faster. And I would have spent more time with people.” It was consistent. The most scarce resource is talent. We are awash in capital. It’s talent that you need to drive it.
David Hain's insight:

McKinsey CEO on why most Boards don't spend nearly enough time on people, and the cops of failing to do so.

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Joe Boutte's curator insight, May 31, 3:42 PM

People, people, people, always!

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What Will You Stop Doing?

What Will You Stop Doing? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
If it feels like you or your organization are always having to add something new to your plate, this is for you. It feels like a default tendency of the world we live in to ask more of ourselves, our teams, and our organizations without providing the time, resources, and energy that are needed for those extras. I find that this is particularly true when the word innovation is invoked. We’re simultaneously asked to innovate but also to maintain all the programs, services, and projects that help keep the status quo afloat. A common question I hear at all levels is, "How do we innovate when we're barely staying on top of our regular work as it is?"
David Hain's insight:

This syndrome is true of nearly every client I work with, especially in the public sector. More is, mostly, less...

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Successfully transitioning to new leadership roles | McKinsey 

Studies show that two years after executive transitions, anywhere between 27 and 46 percent of them are regarded as failures or disappointments. Leaders rank organizational politics as the main challenge: 68 percent of transitions founder on issues related to politics, culture, and people, and 67 percent of leaders wish they had moved faster to change the culture. These matters aren’t problems only for leaders who come in from the outside: 79 percent of external and 69 percent of internal hires report that implementing culture change is difficult. Bear in mind that these are senior leaders who demonstrated success and showed intelligence, initiative, and results in their previous roles. It would seem that Marshall Goldsmith’s advice—“What got you here won’t get you there” —is fully applicable to executive transitions.

David Hain's insight:

Transitions - everyone has to make them, some more than others. McKinsey says they are stressful, and we are mostly under-prepared. What got you here...

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Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.