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The #1 Shift to Move from Management to Leadership - Forbes

The #1 Shift to Move from Management to Leadership - Forbes | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Converting complexity to clarity may be the most critical competency to move us from management effectiveness to leadership excellence.


Via Gary Morrison
David Hain's insight:

Complexity to clarity - hallmark of the best leaders!

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Rim Riahi's curator insight, March 3, 2013 2:45 AM

Converting complexity to clarity may be the most critical competency to move us from management effectiveness to leadership excellence.

Kudos's curator insight, March 11, 2013 1:28 PM

About time. Seems like common sense. Kick out the wonks.

Coaching Leaders
Helping leaders to develop themselves and others
Curated by David Hain
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The 5 Levels of Trust | Jesse Lyn Stoner

The 5 Levels of Trust | Jesse Lyn Stoner | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What is Trust?
As important as trust is, one of the problems is we are not always talking about the same thing when we talk about trust. Trust is a general, all-encompassing word that means many different things.
Huge misunderstandings can occur when we talk about “trust.” If you say you don’t trust someone, do you mean you don’t believe they are honest or do you mean you don’t believe you can depend on them to get the job done on time? If someone says they don’t trust you, what exactly don’t they trust?
There are different levels and intensity of trust. Honesty is a more basic level and has a stronger intensity than dependability.
Understanding the levels of trust and their intensity can help you build a strong foundation of trust and communicate more clearly when others violate your trust.
David Hain's insight:

Excellent article on  the most important factor in all relationships - trust. @JesseLynnStoner well worth following on leadership things that matter!

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Agnes Menso's curator insight, Today, 1:57 PM

Excellent article on  the most important factor in all relationships - trust. @JesseLynnStoner well worth following on leadership things that matter!

Ian Berry's curator insight, Today, 4:27 PM
Like this model. Ultimate trust is being accountable.
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The halo effect, and other managerial delusions | McKinsey & Company

The halo effect, and other managerial delusions | McKinsey & Company | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Rather than succumb to the hyperbole and false promises found in so much management writing, business strategists would do far better to improve their powers of critical thinking. Wise executives should be able to think clearly about the quality of research claims and to detect some of the egregious errors that pervade the business world. Indeed, the capacity for critical thinking is an important asset for any business strategist—one that allows the executive to cut through the clutter and to discard the delusions, embracing instead a more realistic understanding of business success and failure.
David Hain's insight:

Roughly 1500 books about 'leadership' are published each year, not to mention numerous articles, case studies, and white papers. The majority promise to 'show the way'. No wonder there is a temptation to try the ideas. But context and critical analysis are much more valuable than magic bullets. Beware fad surfing! 

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Are you a high performing leadership team? ….. ten questions to ask yourselves! - Metalogue

Are you a high performing leadership team? ….. ten questions to ask yourselves! - Metalogue | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In recent years, I’ve noticed that enquiries for team development and coaching, invariably start with the statement: “we (or they) need to be a high performing team.” On face value, this strikes me as a reasonable request. However, I’ve learnt that this statement covers a whole range of ills, dysfunctionalities and possibilities. It gets used as a proxy for ‘help us sort out our problems…without risking exploring what these might be’.

In truth, there are no off-the-shelf answers to what constitutes high performance for a leadership team. Every team needs to work it out for themselves. However, we believe that there are important questions that a leadership team needs to ask itself which can act as a starting point of a conversation or development process.

Below are ten questions we think it is important for every leadership team to ask itself:
David Hain's insight:

Useful diagnostic to discuss with your leadership team - then act on the results!

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Agnes Menso's curator insight, January 17, 3:20 AM

Useful diagnostic to discuss with your leadership team - then act on the results!

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A New Frontier for Executive Coaching

A New Frontier for Executive Coaching | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Chaotic, largely unexplored, and fraught with risk, yet immensely promising” is a description of the coaching industry from “The Wild West of Executive Coaching,” a 2004 ground-breaking article in Harvard Business Review by the president and CEO of the Executive Coaching Network, Alyssa Freas, and U.S. top 50 coach Stratford Sherman.
Flash forward more than a decade later. Are we still in the midst of a coaching rodeo? Has the field continued to gallop ahead but in many directions?
The answer is complicated. It is true that the executive coaching industry still comes with its share of fuzzy evaluation metrics, a lack of standard qualifications and uneven execution, but in many ways, the field has also evolved — and in unexpected ways.
Here I examine the areas in which the executive coaching industry has properly evolved — as well as the areas where there is still room for improvement.

David Hain's insight:

Interesting viewpoint on the state of executive coaching. Well on the way, but with a fair distance to go on both supply and demand side.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 16, 9:10 PM

What do you think.  Are you willing to introduce it to your leadership?

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Adhocracy - a new management approach | London Business School

Adhocracy - a new management approach | London Business School | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Already, a growing number of firms are betting that more and better use of data can give them a tangible competitive boost in the here and now: more detailed knowledge, and better analysis - of customers, employees and the business environment - have the potential to reduce risk and uncertainty and radically improve decision-making. In an information age, competitive edge will surely accrue to those firms which use information best. Won’t it?

We shouldn’t assume so. Managers are wrong to put their faith in any such certainty, argue Jonas Ridderstrale and Julian Birkinshaw in their new book, Fast/Forward. The title sums up a deceptively simple theme: in a fast-changing world, mountains of data and super-detailed analytics can get us only so far. Indeed, they carry risks of their own. Ridderstrale and Birkinshaw observe that many companies are more comfortable analysing and debating than acting decisively and intuitively. The default assumption that more and better information is always better actually cramps companies’ ability to move fast. To navigate the future, the ability to act with decision and purpose will trump big data. Priorities need to be reversed.
David Hain's insight:

With big data, it's less likely that the analysis is the problem, more likely that strategic decision making doesn't cut it. Enter, iteration, adaptation and adhocracy - but they need a big mindset change from our top-down past!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 16, 9:11 PM

I love it, what do you think!  I believe it would be well worth considering by large companies.

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Keeping Your Strategy Meetings Focused on the Long Term

Keeping Your Strategy Meetings Focused on the Long Term | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Mauricio knew that he must carve out time for strategic conversations with his leadership team, but during a one-on-one coaching session he told me he was puzzled. When he had suggested to his leadership team that they have these conversations, people had nodded their heads and said they’d raise strategic agenda items. Yet their meetings continued to focus on the day-to-day numbers, operational processes, and immediate crises.

Unfortunately, this scenario is common for many leadership teams — when facing immediate concerns, it’s difficult to remain strategic. Senior executives need to balance the long- and short-term demands of their businesses, and meetings need to mirror this balance. But they rarely do when executives don’t realize the pitfalls of meetings that conflate strategy and operations.
David Hain's insight:

I come across this scenario all the time. Short term stuff gets complained about, but top teams keep on doing it. Strategy is longed for, but rarely happens because of the previous scenario. Maybe people just play to what they're good at and avoid the stuff (without easy answers) in the 'too difficult' box? Or maybe they haven't left operational management behind. Whatever, it creates a vicious cycle...

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 10, 9:19 PM

This is tough to do when much of the world thinks in terms of the short term rewards process?

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Six trends to look out for in 2018 | London Business School

Six trends to look out for in 2018 | London Business School | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The world’s a mess, times are turbulent and almost every business is facing disruption. It’s all too much! Whatever next? Sadly we don’t have a crystal ball but here’s the next best thing. We proudly bring you some of London Business School’s finest minds looking ahead to 2018 and sharing their depth of expertise. From big tech to individual consumer behaviour, from adult learning to the impact of AI, from happier employees to better leaders and a more inclusive workplace – it’s all here. You’re welcome.
David Hain's insight:

Some positive business trend predictions from LBS for 2018. I hope they are right!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, January 10, 9:17 PM

What do you think?

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The three stages of leadership | London Business School

The three stages of leadership | London Business School | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How do we promote our leaders? How do we decide that a person is ready to take on a role with a brand new remit and unfamiliar responsibilities? We do it trusting that a person will succeed, based on often nothing more than a hunch. “But wait!” I hear you cry. “People are promoted based on their success in their current role. It’s how it works everywhere.” This is true. People are promoted to the next level based on their previous performance. But does this make sense?
David Hain's insight:

Leadership transitions are notoriously difficult and often unsupported - hence, many failures and much potential lost. This insightful framework could help...

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Ian Berry's curator insight, January 8, 11:18 PM
I think there are 3 more foundational stages that everything else flows from self-leadership, leading for others and leading for leaders
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Do you think like a hedgehog or a fox?

Do you think like a hedgehog or a fox? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
There are basically two types of person: one that believes that there are two types of person, and another that doesn’t. Despite having reservations about over-simplistic categorization, there are some theories which carry both practical wisdom and managerial relevance. One of the inspiring ones is the distinction between hedgehogs and foxes made by British philosopher Isaiah Berlin. He distinguishes between people who strive for a coherent world view with logic and an organising principle (hedgehogs), and others who are comfortable with loose ends and with not relating things systematically to a bigger picture (foxes).
David Hain's insight:

Are you a hedgehog or a fox? And are you developing hedgehogs or foxes? In the digital, VUCA age, the answer may be increasingly important!

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Ian Berry's curator insight, December 8, 2017 5:07 PM
I love the hybrid concept It's a consequence of living both/and and not either/or
David Stapleton's curator insight, December 10, 2017 3:34 PM
Persoality is distinct between philosiphy and the coherent world view
Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, December 11, 2017 2:32 AM
Do you think like a hedgehog or a fox?
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The Impact of Trust on Financial Returns: Special Report

The Impact of Trust on Financial Returns: Special Report | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In 2010 Trust Across America introduced the FACTS® Framework, a comprehensive unbiased barometer of the corporate integrity of America’s largest 2000 US public companies. The Framework identifies companies whose leadership is going beyond doing just what is legal to choosing what is right in meeting all stakeholder needs. The FACTS® Framework is the most comprehensive and data driven ongoing study on this subject. We analyze companies quarterly and rank order showing trends by company, sector and market capitalization. Read more about the Framework at this link.

Every year since 2012 we have announced our “Top Ten Most Trustworthy Public Companies” via the Trust Across America blog. The following table displays the current returns of every annual list vs. the S&P 500 since its publication.
David Hain's insight:

More empirical proof that increasing trust pays out. Perhaps corporate integrity should be a target before shareholder value, as one seems to follow the other!

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From Patriarchy To Partnership – The Paradigm Shift Our Organisations Need | Corporate Rebels

From Patriarchy To Partnership – The Paradigm Shift Our Organisations Need | Corporate Rebels | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
We are in a paradigm and most of us are blind to it. You could call it Theory X or top-down, but one way to summarise it is that we are in a parent-child paradigm. There have been shades of this throughout history but perhaps none more dominant than the Industrial Era which was fuelled by the worldview that employees, then largely uneducated, are naturally stupid and lazy and must be monitored, controlled and motivated.

Incredibly, this is still the prevailing paradigm in workplaces today. We might have upgraded it a little, but not much. (Just read this mind blowing article by Aeon about the ‘stupidity paradox’ in organisations.) But what about companies that invest heavily in employee engagement programmes and making their people happy? Often this is just a different shade of being a parent – either a caring parent, or a coercive parent! The underlying belief is still: “people need to be motivated and taken care of to be productive.”

“We already know how to be good parents at work. The alternative, partnership, is something we are just learning about. Our difficulty with creating partnership is that parenting – and its stronger cousin, patriarchy – is so deeply ingrained in our muscle memory and armature that we don’t even realise we are doing it.”

– Peter Block, Stewardship
David Hain's insight:

Paternalism is the enemy of genuinely distributed leadership. Bosses need to stop behaving like parents!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 3, 2017 12:19 PM

Your thoughts?

Ian Berry's curator insight, December 4, 2017 4:28 PM
Agree with the premise. Good diagram and references. The first step I think is letting go of the need to be in control
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 4, 2017 5:20 PM
I agree, but having worked in private industry and in public schools I am not hopeful. What we need is to be attentive to the pretexts and subtexts of our organizations that lead to oppressive structures, so we can shift paradigms and liberate adults by treating them as responible, autonomous beings.

Is our objective to create algorithms so we can simply replace people who stand up? Being a rebel is fun. It upsets the ones who simply want conformity and compliance.

Being adult-adult doesn’t mean we get to do what we want or that there is a leadership vacuum. It means we are truly in a partnership, [responsible for our actions and] to each other.
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Best Business Books 2017: Leadership

Best Business Books 2017: Leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Christmas present time?

David Hain's insight:

Christmas present time?

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Jim Collins On The ‘Beautiful, Giant Question’ That Launched His Career

Jim Collins On The ‘Beautiful, Giant Question’ That Launched His Career | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
“How do you make society both more productive and more humane at the same time?” Because if you think about it, it’s a beautiful, giant question. I think that the grandeur of that question and the idea that, “Okay, then you’re running a company,” or, “You’re running a non-profit,” or…you’re doing what sort of fits into that. But the idea of a, “how do you make things both more productive and more humane at the same time,” is one of those human questions.
David Hain's insight:

This is a pretty big question for leaders everywhere - marrying productivity and human wellbeing. The answer isn't shareholder value!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 3, 2017 12:20 PM

Continuous improvement is key to growth!

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 4, 2017 4:22 PM
When I read this article, I thought of how essential teaching is to forming a humane world. The role model we provide can guide our students even when we are not present.
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Servant Leadership in Action

Servant Leadership in Action | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

4 leaders who put others first!

David Hain's insight:

Leadership secret sauce - the power of love rather than the love of power?

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5 Common Mental Errors That Sway Your Decision Making

5 Common Mental Errors That Sway Your Decision Making | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
For a long time, researchers and economists believed that humans made logical, well-considered decisions. In recent decades, however, researchers have uncovered a wide range of mental errors that derail our thinking. Sometimes we make logical decisions, but there are many times when we make emotional, irrational, and confusing choices.

Psychologists and behavioral researchers love to geek out about these different mental mistakes. There are dozens of them and they all have fancy names like “mere exposure effect” or “narrative fallacy.” But I don’t want to get bogged down in the scientific jargon today. Instead, let’s talk about the mental errors that show up most frequently in our lives and break them down in easy-to-understand language.

Here are five common mental errors that sway you from making good decisions.
David Hain's insight:

Confirmation bias and other regular mental traps - enemies of good decisions!

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The case for behavioral strategy 

In this article, we share the results of new research quantifying the financial benefits of processes that “debias” strategic decisions. The size of this prize makes a strong case for practicing behavioral strategy—a style of strategic decision making that incorporates the lessons of psychology. It starts with the recognition that even if we try, like Baron Münchhausen, to escape the swamp of biases by pulling ourselves up by our own hair, we are unlikely to succeed. Instead, we need new norms for activities such as managing meetings (for more on running unbiased meetings, see “Taking the bias out of meetings”), gathering data, discussing analogies, and stimulating debate that together can diminish the impact of cognitive biases on critical decisions. To support those new norms, we also need a simple language for recognizing and discussing biases, one that is grounded in the reality of corporate life, as opposed to the sometimes-arcane language of academia. All this represents a significant commitment and, in some organizations, a profound cultural change.
David Hain's insight:

Useful contribution to strategic decision making and how to prevent bias loss from McKinsey.

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Susan Cain: Leading the “Quiet Revolution”

Susan Cain: Leading the “Quiet Revolution” | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
For decades, introversion was looked at as something to overcome, almost like an illness. The way to win in life was through charisma, outspokenness, and self-promotion.

Even now, in an increasingly noisy world, introverts may feel added pressure to take one of two paths: force themselves into more extroverted behavior, or become even more reserved and shrink back to themselves.

My guest Susan Cain says both paths are wrong and in fact, rob the world of the unique contributions introverts make when they choose to be true to themselves.
David Hain's insight:

Good interview with the cheerleader for the world's introverts!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 3, 2017 12:20 PM

As an ambivert I can identify!

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Can CEOs be un-disruptable?

Can CEOs be un-disruptable? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Chief executives have traditionally sat at the intersection of the external environment and the internal organization, observing chaos and translating it into clear and actionable instructions. At this “nerve center” for essential information, our popular perception of the “un-disruptable” CEO is of a rigid, impenetrable figure, successfully staring down external adversity. Whether this image ever truly matched reality is debatable, but we know one thing for sure: it definitely no longer applies. To be un-disruptable today requires much more than steering companies through singular (if monumental) events—it demands leaders navigate constant turbulence, continuously adjusting their actions accordingly.

David Hain's insight:

Lots of consultant jargon here, but an insightful approach to skills increasingly needed by 21c CEOs.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, November 11, 2017 4:45 PM

Personally I believe you must be disruptive to be a great CEO!

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, November 22, 2017 4:30 AM
Can CEOs be un-disruptable?
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Flashcards to Learn 168 Cognitive Biases – Tradecraft 

Flashcards to Learn 168 Cognitive Biases – Tradecraft  | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
At Tradecraft we spend a lot of time thinking about thinking. So we loved Buster Benson’s epic post on cognitive biases. If you haven’t read it lately, refresh your memory here. We wanted a way to…
David Hain's insight:

Very useful self-development and coaching tool!

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Ariana Amorim's curator insight, August 3, 2017 3:05 PM
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 3, 2017 5:06 PM

What do you think?

Ian Berry's curator insight, August 5, 2017 7:52 PM
Even the 4 quadrants and the outer ring I found valuable Extraordinary piece of work
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Why Taking Responsibility Is Always the Best Leadership Choice

Why Taking Responsibility Is Always the Best Leadership Choice | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The main goal of choosing to take ownership of the issue to begin with was ensuring everybody could get back to work and resume pre-crisis levels of productivity and pride in their jobs. Don’t allow an issue to define you, or the organization. Everybody has lots to do – especially you. While you have to learn from your mistakes, avoid comparing every situation to the crises of yesterday. Stop yourself from reminding everybody constantly of what has already transpired. The issue occurred. You took responsibility for it, held people accountable and, with everybody’s help, you fixed it. You pledged not to make the same mistake again. It’s in your rearview. Keep it there. And get back to the exciting work of creating enduring value for all your stakeholders.

The next time you’re in the midst of a crisis, don’t try to deflect, or underestimate people, or nitpick about whose fault it was. Choose to take responsibility as the leader. Own the problem, take a hard-nosed approach, hold people accountable, present a solution, get to work, and don’t make the same mistake twice. You’ll stave off disaster, fix problems faster, build trust, and get better results.
David Hain's insight:

Great advice from Doug Conant!

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 3, 2017 2:11 PM
We teach through our examples and character. Pedagogy and educate etymologically come from leading. The virtues and character of a leader say more than their words.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 3, 2017 5:06 PM

I totally agree!

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What’s missing in leadership development? | McKinsey & Company

Organizations have always needed leaders who are good at recognizing emerging challenges and inspiring organizational responses. That need is intensifying today as leaders confront, among other things, digitization, the surging power of data as a competitive weapon, and the ability of artificial intelligence to automate the workplace and enhance business performance. These technology-driven shifts create an imperative for most organizations to change, which in turn demands more and better leaders up and down the line.

Unfortunately, there is overwhelming evidence that the plethora of services, books, articles, seminars, conferences, and TED-like talks purporting to have the answers—a global industry estimated to be worth more than $50 billion—are delivering disappointing results. According to a recent Fortune survey, only 7 percent of CEOs believe their companies are building effective global leaders, and just 10 percent said that their leadership-development initiatives have a clear business impact. Our latest research has a similar message: only 11 percent of more than 500 executives we polled around the globe strongly agreed with the statement that their leadership-development interventions achieve and sustain the desired results.

In our survey, we asked executives to tell us about the circumstances in which their leadership-development programs were effective and when they were not. We found that much needs to happen for leadership development to work at scale, and there is no “silver bullet” that will singlehandedly make the difference between success and failure
David Hain's insight:

McKinsey survey confirms my own much less formal conclusion from clients - leadership development needs context, reach and especially follow-through to be really meaningful.

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Ian Berry's curator insight, August 2, 2017 7:06 PM
I like the emphasis here on behaviour. My own research says it's who before do. This is such an important topic it's one of my 5 regular complimentary webinars the next on leadership development ROI is in September https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-to-make-certain-your-leadership-development-is-high-value-for-money-tickets-35105768298
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How to Make the Most of Your Workday

How to Make the Most of Your Workday | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When you multitask, you tend to make more mistakes. When you toggle back and forth between tasks, the neural networks of your brain must backtrack to figure out where they left off and then reconfigure, Dr. Miller said. That extra activity causes you to slow down, and errors become more likely.

“People are much more efficient if they monotask,” he said.

Trying to multitask also impedes creativity, he said. Truly innovative thinking arises when we allow our brains to follow a logical path of associated thoughts and ideas, and this is more likely when we can focus on a single mental pathway for an extended period.


The brain is like a muscle: It becomes stronger with use, Dr. Miller said. As with physical exercise, the more we strengthen our mental connections by focusing on one task to the exclusion of all others, the better we can perform.
David Hain's insight:

Maybe multitasking should be less of a boast and more of a blooper?

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 1, 2017 2:07 PM

Totally agree, multitasking is something that can cause more damage that helping. 

Jerry Busone's curator insight, August 2, 2017 7:26 AM

Check out how to enhance a productive work day

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20th CEO Survey: US key findings

20th CEO Survey: US key findings | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Over the past 20 years CEOs have witnessed tremendous upheavals as a result of globalisation and technological change. In our 20th CEO Survey, nearly 1,400 CEOs share their views on the impact of these forces on growth, talent, trust and society. In this short video, PwC’s global chairman Bob Moritz, reflects on how today we’re at an inflection point; for leaders it’s now time to both raise and communicate the role of business in society and the positive impact it can have.
David Hain's insight:

What's keeping US CEOs up at night? 

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8 talent management trends for 2018 | HR Trend Institute

8 talent management trends for 2018 | HR Trend Institute | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When you ask CEO’s and CHRO’s what their key priorities are for the coming year, talent management always is one of the issues high on the list. Talent management is an easy and safe choice. Nobody will argue that talent management is not important. Supervisory Boards love to talk about succession and talent management. Talent management is generally seen as something long-term. When you hear terms as “strategic”, “long-term”, “future” and “investment”, you must be careful. For talent management this means: it is important, but not urgent. For the CEO, it means: I have ticked the box, but now HR can deal with it. Of course, I will visit the final session of the senior management program, of course, I will personally mentor one or two high potentials, but please, do not bother me too much about talent management, I have more urgent matters on my plate.  A big challenge for organisations is to make talent management urgent, and to make it a priority of today, not of the future.
David Hain's insight:

Tom Haak of HR Trend Institute on how to get more form your talent in 2017.

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John Ludike's curator insight, August 1, 2017 4:03 AM
Talent & Future of work Trends everywhere
Jerry Busone's curator insight, August 2, 2017 7:31 AM

Big trend is to focus on today ...  it is no longer necessary to divide the workforce in crude segments (“High Potentials”, “Middle Management”, “The older employees”). Moved people based on today, give potentials a chance earlier and have an organic approach to development .

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Critical thinking skills are more important than IQ for making good decisions in life

Critical thinking skills are more important than IQ for making good decisions in life | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
To lead a good life, we need to make good decisions: manage our health and financial affairs, invest in appropriate relationships, and avoid serious lapses like falling for online scams. What equips us to do this? One candidate is IQ: after all, people who score higher on intelligence tests tend to go on to do better academically and in their careers. But many of us know intellectual titans who still make grave errors of judgment in their lives. Book-smart doesn’t necessarily make you life-smart, and a new article in the journal Thinking Skills and Creativity examines the utility of IQ in navigating existence, and how another mental ability may put it in the shade.

Whereas IQ is – crudely speaking – a measure of the mental horsepower we have for handling abstract content, some researchers say that “critical thinking” – the ability to make judgments dispassionately without jumping to false conclusions – is a separate ability. To find out if critical thinking ability might be important for real-life outcomes, perhaps even more than IQ, Heather Butler of California State University and her colleagues asked 244 participants – a mix of students and adults recruited online – to complete tests, of their IQ and critical thinking skills.

David Hain's insight:

More evidence that just being bright doesn't't fully cut the mustard for success. And critical thinking skills can be taught and developed!

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 1, 2017 2:13 PM

Have always had this opinion.  Couples well with Attitude.

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.