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Your Employees Just Aren't That Into You

Your Employees Just Aren't That Into You | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A new survey shows that employees who aren't into their jobs cite their relationship with their boss as the biggest problem.

Via Barry Deutsch
David Hain's insight:

It's said that people join organisations and leave managers. Some stats and reasons why here.

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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, January 15, 2013 4:34 PM

For years I've been talking about how one of the most important elements of employee satisfaction is highly correlated to the "relationship (read: trust) an employee has with their boss.


It's nice to see my anecdotal experience of working with thousands of Vistage and TEC companies statistically validated. The problem I see is that most entrepreneurial companies and small businesses put managers in charge that DO NOT understand how to manage, coach, guide their teams.


The managers are good people - the training is inadequate OR non-existent.


Barry Deutsch

IMPACT Hiring Solutions HIRE and RETAIN Top Talent

http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com/blog

 

Do you have a FREE Copy of our best selling e-book on how to hiring and retaining top talent?

 

http://www.impacthiringsolutions.com/hiring-managers/hiring-products/our-award-winning-book/a-digital-ebook-version

 

Learn how your success depends on the quality of the team you build and keep by joining us in our LinkedIn Discussion Group on hiring and retaining top talent

 

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/IMPACT-Hiring-Solutions-HOW-Hire-1819296/about

John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's curator insight, January 18, 2013 1:41 PM
A great article exploring why staff just don't buy into some managers. Especially important when undergoing change. If the staff don't get the managers, change is so much harder and so much more likely to fail. Businesses looking to change need to get their culture right, and their managers on board; if they want their staff to help rather than hinder change.
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What Makes a Great Leader? The Very Same Things That Make a Great Person.

What Makes a Great Leader? The Very Same Things That Make a Great Person. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The thing I learned is that the elements of a great leader are, in a lot of ways, the same elements of a great person. Some people have this idea that leaders act a certain way and have a certain bravado about them. I actually think the truth is far from that, and that the people others want to follow are those who are true to themselves, have authenticity in their relationships, and are great people.

You really want to work for great people, so realizing that being a great leader was just being a better person is very liberating in a lot of ways.”
David Hain's insight:

We are human beings first, bosses, supervisors or leaders by result of perceptions held by others. Maybe one route to being an excellent leader is  to concentrate foremost on being an excellent human being?

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Lets kill leadership

Lets kill leadership | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In his novel Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, Haruki Murakami introduces a character called Aka. He is an aspiring educator, someone training company employees. Aka declares the following:

“One thing I learned from working in a company was that the majority of people in the world have no problem following orders. They’re actually happy to be told what to do. They might complain, but that’s how they really feel. They just grumble out of habit. If you told them to think for themselves, and make their own decisions and take responsibility for them, they’d be clueless.”

Tsukuru, Aka’s colleague, is appalled by the cynicism of his friend’s view of humanity.

But maybe – just maybe – Aka is right. Perhaps most people really do want simply to follow orders; they don’t want to think for themselves. And if Aka’s view of the world is correct, what are the implications?

In a wealthy society replete with opportunity, perhaps there are few sadder sights than a well-educated 50-year-old still in employment, still reporting to a boss, still working a five-day week, still fearful of stepping out of line and still dependent on the beneficence of others.
David Hain's insight:

Too much leadership and hierarchy breeds too much followership? Impacts on degree of initiative, self-determination and accountability.

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Best Business Books 2018

Best Business Books 2018 | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
in this, our 18th annual Best Business Books collection, a series of learned guides have taken the time to identify the three most compelling reads in seven core genres.
David Hain's insight:

Christmas coming up - some gift ideas?

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Kill Your Performance Ratings

Kill Your Performance Ratings | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Evidence is mounting that conventional approaches to strategic human capital management are broken. This is particularly true for performance management (PM) systems—the appraisal approaches in which employees (working with their managers) set goals for the year; managers interview others who have worked with them and write up an appraisal; employees are rated and ranked numerically; and salary, bonus, and promotion opportunities are awarded accordingly. A 2013 survey by the Society for Human Resource Management asked HR professionals about the quality of their own PM systems; only 23 percent said their company was above average in the way it conducted them. Other studies uncovered even more disdain. According to the Corporate Executive Board (CEB), a management research group, surveys have found that 95 percent of managers are dissatisfied with their PM systems, and 90 percent of HR heads believe they do not yield accurate information.

The performance management systems in many companies are misleading, cumbersome, and complex, requiring some HR departments to put aside an entire quarter to manage them. More important, they can be counterproductive. In the context of neuroscience research, most PM practices turn out to damage the performance they are intended to improve. That’s because they are based on a fundamental misunderstanding of human responses, as revealed in recurring patterns of mental activity.
David Hain's insight:

Want to make a huge difference to motivation in your organisation and bring a growth mindset to the staff? Zap the performance ranking system and replace with regular learning conversations! There are many reasons why, eloquently explained here.

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Dan Pink: Timing really is everything

Dan Pink: Timing really is everything | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
How do you make decisions? Sometimes, you might use a planned, scientific process, but you’re probably making many decisions on autopilot, by using your gut or guessing. Maybe your decision-making ability is limited because of situational constraints.

It's a lot to think about!

Unfortunately, as author Daniel Pink argues, we rarely stop to think, is this the right timing? And even if we did, how would we know what the right timing is?

The author of “Drive” and other best-sellers was a keynote speaker Sept. 23 at the 104th ICMA Annual Conference in Baltimore, Md. His most recent book, “When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing,” is an exploration of all the science behind the timing of beginnings, midpoints and endings.

The book is more than a catalogue of random science, however; it is an attempt to connect research into timing from a variety of fields and discover insights that people can apply in their everyday lives.
David Hain's insight:

Turns out there is quite a bit of science behind how best to time things. Dan Pink's latest book is all about it - but for the time-poor, this short read has a few key ideas...

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Lessons for Management Fixers

Lessons for Management Fixers | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
At some point in your management career, you’re likely to be placed in a situation where your charter is to fix what’s not working.

Whether it’s poor sales, decreasing customer satisfaction or declining performance indicators, the reasons vary, but the challenge remains the same—figure out what’s wrong and fix it.

An invitation to step in and turn a team or function around is a significant vote of confidence in your abilities and a potential career enhancement opportunity. Of course, first, you’ve got to get it right. Here are some hard-won tips on navigating and succeeding when you’re the management fixer.
David Hain's insight:

Art Petty on a tried and tested process of  how to address turnaround activities as a manager. Good advice!

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Why Managers Are Central to an Agile Culture

Why Managers Are Central to an Agile Culture | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

There's growing awareness that organizations need to be far more agile.

Only half of employees globally clearly know what's expected of them at work -- it's hard to respond quickly and nimbly when you're not sure what your responsibilities are.

And most employees are unclear about what their organization stands for, while fewer believe strongly in their organization's values.

There's a reason leaders cite "culture" as an important priority.

Agility, if it exists in an organization at all, is dictated by culture.

David Hain's insight:

Gallup on how mind set work, much more than tools,  is critical to being able to become agile.

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The Mental Habits of Effective Leaders: My Interview with Jennifer Garvey Berger

The Mental Habits of Effective Leaders: My Interview with Jennifer Garvey Berger | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
In this fast-paced digital economy, it’s impossible to see the changes that are on the horizon. That makes it difficult for leaders to prepare for what’s ahead. In her best-selling books, Changing on the Job, and Simple Habits for Complex Times, author and developmental coach Jennifer Garvey Berger teaches the skills and habits you can adopt today to make you more agile and adaptable to any scenario.

During our discussion, we explore some of the methods Jennifer uses to help individuals become better listeners, better learners, and better leaders. There was so much wisdom in this interview that it was difficult to decide what excerpts to share.
David Hain's insight:

There is a lot of leadership wisdom in this podcast from the always excellent Farnam Street blog site.

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Get rid of the 9-grid

Get rid of the 9-grid | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The 9-grid is typically one of the HR tools designed in the last century. I think it was designed by McKinsey for GE, probably together with the famous principle: always get rid of your bottom 10% low performers. I have used the 9-grid a lot, and I have spent hours in sessions with senior management (“calibration meetings”), discussing the exact place of the potentials in the grid. In hindsight, I think this was generally a waste of time. In my view, we should get rid of the 9-grid.
David Hain's insight:

Do your organistion a favour - ditch the 9-box grid! Outdated, biased, artificially 'fair' and divisive. Has done lasting damage to many people, and gives managers an excuse not to provide regular feedback. Spend those wasted levelling discussions with 1:1s and team meetings!

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The Hidden Curriculum of Work

The Hidden Curriculum of Work | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
What do you do for work? Not, what is your job title, or what’s written in your official job description? But what do you actually do?

It’s potentially the most important question you can ask yourself if you care about standing out, staying ahead of the change curve, and continuously elevating your performance to gain access to choice assignments and opportunities to advance.

This is because the value you deliver, the results you produce, and the impact you have on others come more often from the execution of unspoken intangibles that are not reflected in your title, job description, or the daily tasks and activities you’re responsible for. This severe mismatch is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the true demands of work.

David Hain's insight:

Most people have two jobs - one of which is implicit, intangible, much more complex than the typical job description - and essential to success. Useful article from a PWC coach on identifying  the hidden world that underpins your job.

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Why Leaders Need to Cultivate Complementary Strengths

Why Leaders Need to Cultivate Complementary Strengths | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
We all have attributes that simultaneously work for us and against us. The solution is not to subdue our strengths but to add ingredients that balance them out. In other words, build complementary skills.
David Hain's insight:

Excellent coaching advice from Peter Bregman - for practising coaches or people who act as their own coach.

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CEOs should have been the fall guys; why are they still heroes?

CEOs should have been the fall guys; why are they still heroes? | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Today, business founders such as Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg or even Larry Fink epitomise a new class of celebrity CEOs, seen by so many as personal heroes who can save the world, and the same goes for the larger array of employee CEOs such as Jamie Dimon at JPMorgan Chase or Tim Cook at Apple. Yet all the while, CEOs participate in a world economy wracked by increasing inequality, as epitomised by the kind of obscene CEO remuneration that sees the likes of Amazon’s boss Jeff Bezos earning almost a million times that of the workers in his warehouses.
David Hain's insight:

Why do we need heroes, when experience suggests that a) they are rarely without flaws and b) that leadership is increasingly proven to be a collaborative, whole systems enterprise? Interesting opinion piece from Carl Rhodes and Peter Bloom.

 

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7 Things to Try When You're Leading that First Big Organizational Change

I know there are about 1 Billion articles and books on change. I’ve read many of them. The list below is stuff I have used, mostly successfully, to lead some big organizational, process and culture changes that involved teams from 60–1,200. They are people-focused. Because change is people-focused.

You might use one or two or all of them depending on the scale and complexity of the changes you want to make. I’m not giving you a step-by-step, just general themes on which you can build. As always, take what you like, and leave the rest.
David Hain's insight:

Essy to read, but useful, take on leading change by Scott Mabry.

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The case for behavioral strategy | McKinsey

Left unchecked, subconscious biases will undermine strategic decision making. Here’s how to counter them and improve corporate performance.

Once heretical, behavioral economics is now mainstream. Money managers employ its insights about the limits of rationality in understanding investor behavior and exploiting stock-pricing anomalies. Policy makers use behavioral principles to boost participation in retirement-savings plans. Marketers now understand why some promotions entice consumers and others don’t.

Yet very few corporate strategists making important decisions consciously take into account the cognitive biases—systematic tendencies to deviate from rational calculations—revealed by behavioral economics. It’s easy to see why: unlike in fields such as finance and marketing, where executives can use psychology to make the most of the biases residing in others, in strategic decision making leaders need to recognize their own biases. So despite growing awareness of behavioral economics and numerous efforts by management writers, including ourselves, to make the case for its application, most executives have a justifiably difficult time knowing how to harness its power.

David Hain's insight:

When making important business decisions, rational analysis alone is not enough. Classic McKinsey article on how to implement behavioural processes that improve the chances of making better decisions.

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What is holacracy? The management approach tested by Google and Zappos.

What is holacracy? The management approach tested by Google and Zappos. | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Ultimately, the greatest value of holacracy may be the idea of holacracy itself. It may not work for every company, but its premise is revolutionary. In essence, it asks for more soulfulness at work—for all of us, no matter our job title, to show up with more intentionality every day. It asks for us to engage with the terrifying act of transcending our egos.

“Look at the stuff that gets in the way of humans connecting fully as humans,” says Robertson. “It’s the politics, bureaucracy—instead of us being vulnerable, authentic creatures that fail. Let’s get a lot of that out of the way.”
David Hain's insight:

Interesting article about the history and practice of holacracy. It probably isn't the future of work - much to complex for most organisations. But it points us firmly in the direction of a more human workplace where people at all levels act on their responsibilities in an atmosphere of common purpose. David Marquet's "Turn the Ship Around" never once mentions holacracy - but it does offfer a compelling story about a method of developing leaders at ever level.

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Achim's Energy Boost

Achim's Energy Boost | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Batching is the simple habit of performing like-minded tasks together instead of bouncing from one task to the next.

We live in a bouncing time. Mental bouncing, task bouncing. Enter Adam Grant, award-winning rock star author and the highest-rated professor at The Wharton School. In his terrific book “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World” Grand Central Publishing/2016), Cal Newport describes how the prolific Adam Grant batches his time.

Though Grant’s productivity depends on many factors, there’s one idea in particular that seems central to his method: the batching of hard but important intellectual work into long, uninterrupted stretches. Grant performs this batching at multiple levels. Within the year, he stacks his teaching into the fall semester, during which he can turn all of his attention to teaching his students. By batching his teaching in the fall, Grant can then turn his attention fully to research in the spring and summer … Grant also batches his work on a smaller time scale. Within a semester dedicated to research, he alternates between periods when his door is open to students and colleagues, and periods when he isolates himself to focus completely and without distraction on a single research task. (Deep Work, page 39)
David Hain's insight:

Achim Nowak and Adam Grant on how batching like-work together can improve productivity and quality.

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The New Leadership Paradigm

The New Leadership Paradigm | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
We owe much of Berrett-Koehler’s success to “eating our own cooking”—putting the ideas espoused by these and other books we have published into practice in our own company.

In my chart The New Leadership Paradigm I lay out ten dimensions of the old command-and-control leadership paradigm and ten corresponding dimensions of  the new paradigm, which might be called “shared leadership,” “servant leadership,” or “collaborative leadership.”

These ten dimensions were drawn from concepts in BK books. But they also reflect experiences I have had over the years—both those described above and many other experiences interacting with numerous organizations.
David Hain's insight:

Berrett-Koehler is one of the very best publishers of personal and organisational growth books. Partly because they try to walk their talk. Here's why. Includes access to useful download that can help to start a great discussion about how things get done.

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With Alan Mulally - former CEO of Ford Motors and former CEO of Boeing - ANR Newsletter #13

With Alan Mulally - former CEO of Ford Motors and former CEO of Boeing - ANR Newsletter #13 | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
Alan Mulally is an American engineer, programme manager, business executive, and former President and Chief Executive Officer of the Ford Motor Company. He retired from Ford Motor Company on July 1, 2014. Ford had been struggling during the late-2000s recession, returned to profitability under Mulally, and was the only American major car manufacturer to avoid a bailout fund provided by the government.

 Alan’s achievements at Ford are chronicled in the book, An American Icon: Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company by Bryce G. Hoffman, published in 2012. On July 15, 2014, he was appointed to the Google Board of Directors.

Alan was the executive vice president of Boeing and the CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA). He began his career with Boeing as an engineer in 1969 and was largely credited with BCA’s resurgence against Airbus in the mid-2000s.
David Hain's insight:

Interesting story about Alan Ford, exCEO of Ford - emphasis on principles and practices.

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Time's up for the Big Four

Time's up for the Big Four | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The Carillion meltdown follows recent audit controversies involving Tesco and the software company Quindell, among others, similarly relating to profit over-statement and “aggressive accounting”. It’s not just a UK phenomenon. The International Forum of Independent Audit Regulators found that no less than 40% of the audits it inspected last year around the world were sub-standard. All those with serious deficiencies were by KPMG, PwC, EY or Deloitte. These ‘Big Four’ auditors generated combined global revenues of $134 billion last year, directly employing 945,000 people.

They are now under fire in many countries – having been involved in tawdry episodes from the Petrobras scandal in Brazil to the Gupta affair in South Africa. Auditing is in crisis and must be reformed. And the UK, as the world’s financial services superpower, needs to take the lead.

Previous changes to accounting standards, following earlier scandals, mean big auditors are now just box-tickers, able to avoid nuanced judgement. Conflicts of interest remain endemic, between firms, their clients and regulators. Even in advanced country jurisdictions, regulatory oversight is weak and feebly enforced. That’s because the Big Four have been allowed to establish themselves as a hugely powerful, practically untouchable oligopoly – auditing an astonishing 97% of FTSE 350 UK-listed companies and 99% of S&P-500 in the US.

The auditing profession – with its too-big-to-fail and increasingly too-big-to-regulate structure – is at the heart of our crony capitalist crisis. Reforming audit sounds obscure, but is a vital part of re-building public confidence in Western liberal capitalism.
David Hain's insight:

An interesting future beckons for the 'Big 4' auditors - despite three formidable lobbying power, reform is surely near at hand. 

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A Lifetime of Systems Thinking

A Lifetime of Systems Thinking | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

When one reaches 80, one is considered to be ripe and ready for picking. Picking usually consists of the pickers asking the pickee to reflect back on the wisdom he has gained over his lifetime. This request is based on the false assumption that wisdom increases with age. The pickee is then expected to share with the pickers the bits of wisdom he or she may have accumulated. Unfortunately, my bag of wisbits is empty. Whatever I may have once possessed, I have dissipated in my writings.

Pickers may also falsely assume that the clarity with which one can foresee the future increases with age. The fact is that whatever we can see clearly about the future we will take steps to prevent from happening. As Kenneth Boulding once said, If we saw tomorrow’s newspaper today, tomorrow would never happen. Unfortunately, as you know, I have no interest in forecasting the future, only in creating it by acting appropriately in the present. I am a founding member of the Presentology Society.

I have no interest in forecasting the future, only in creating it by acting appropriately in the present. I am a founding member of the Presentology Society.
I also have no interest in reconstructing the past as I would like it to have been. I learned from it precisely because it wasn’t what I expected, which also explains why I don’t remember it. Furthermore, you cannot learn from my mistakes, only from your own. I want to encourage, not discourage, your making your own.

Now where do these self-indulgent reflections leave me? Not surprisingly, where I want to be: discussing the most important aspect of life, having fun. For me there has never been an amount of money that makes it worth doing something that is not fun. So I’m going to recall the principal sources of the fun that I have experienced.

David Hain's insight:

Russell Ackoff died in 2009, but he left behind a lifetime of brilliant insight into how systems work. Some of his wisdom - and sense of fun - is distilled here, and an extensive back-catalogue is available online. If you haven't seen his work and want to know more about how the world really works, check it out.

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State of the Heart 2018: The Latest Research on Emotional Intelligence •

State of the Heart 2018: The Latest Research on Emotional Intelligence • | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The State of the Heart provides new data on emotional intelligence from over 200,000 people in 160 countries, revealing important trends for global EQ and wellbeing.
Tracking global trends in emotional intelligence for over a decade, the State of the Heart is the world’s most extensive research on emotional intelligence strengths, challenges & opportunities. The 2018 findings reveal powerful insights on the shifting capabilities to make a better future. 
David Hain's insight:

Find out what's happening  in terms of global trends in emotional intelligence here.

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Caring Leaders, Better Results

Caring Leaders, Better Results | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
A leader’s concern for others all too often gets sidelined in today’s high-pressure business world. Many leaders assume high pressure yields high productivity, when in fact the opposite is true. Emotionally intelligent leaders who cultivate a positive culture increase engagement and productivity while reducing turnover and health problems among employees.
David Hain's insight:

Daniel Goleman on why caring matters - or maybe why the right kind of caring matters...

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Looking in the Mirror Is the Key to Change – Marshall Goldsmith

Looking in the Mirror Is the Key to Change – Marshall Goldsmith | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
When my friend, Chris Cuomo, journalist and news anchor on CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time, and I met recently, Chris asked me about my coaching style. I love this question, because in asking it and reflecting on it, Chris comes to the answer himself with just some brief explanation from me. I didn’t have to explain much at all. That’s how coaching should work, I think. What do you think?
David Hain's insight:

Marshal Goldsmith on why the mirror test is so critical and how a skilled coach can help.

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Solving the UK productivity puzzle in the digital age | McKinsey

Solving the UK productivity puzzle in the digital age | McKinsey | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it

Boosting productivity growth is important for all advanced economies as they navigate potential economic headwinds, such as an aging population and an ongoing shift to low-productivity services, but particularly for the United Kingdom, with an uncertain outlook for trade and investment after Brexit.
In a new paper, Solving the United Kingdom’s productivity puzzle in a digital age, we identify key reasons for the United Kingdom’s recent weak productivity performance by analyzing cross-country, regional, and sectoral patterns as well as other decompositions of aggregate statistics.

We find that four phenomena—financial sector boom and bust, employment growth, investment decline, and uneven digitization—explain the UK’s larger decline in labor-productivity growth.

David Hain's insight:

If we don't solve the persistent UK productivity deficit, the Brexit/Remain argument becomes relevant only in the context of relative failure levels!

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The Ten Things You Need To Know To Lead Change Effectively

The Ten Things You Need To Know To Lead Change Effectively | Coaching Leaders | Scoop.it
The fundamental role of leaders is to lead change, helping their teams and organisations to navigate the turbulent waters of a VUCA world.
It is accepted that change is now constant and all senior leaders need to develop strength in behaviours to help them lead change effectively.
But even the best of us, when faced with this constant change, will feel daunted and even overwhelmed. The good news is that it doesn’t need to be that way.
As with most things, breaking down the immensity of it all into smaller, more manageable chunks can make it better.
The same can be true of the behaviours needed to lead change.
To develop effective leadership behaviour that will help you, your people and the organisation through change, take a look at each of these ten things and score yourself on a scale of 1 to 5, where “1” is weak and “5” is strong:
David Hain's insight:

Kevin Watson on how you can easily assess your readiness to lead change.

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Kevin Watson's comment, July 23, 7:27 AM
Thanks for sharing, David. Most appreciated :)
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 24, 12:36 PM

Interesting point of view.  What do you think?

Curated by David Hain
People and Change consultant, 25 years experience in Organisation Development. Executive coach. Very experienced facilitator and team developer.