Evan Maslin's CMC 375 Portfolio
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Evan Maslin's CMC 375 Portfolio
My Portfolio throughout this semester
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ESPN: The Worldwide Leader In Sports

ESPN: The Worldwide Leader In Sports | Evan Maslin's CMC 375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

This website is an example of Web 3.0 that is discussed in the Nonprofitorgs article, “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits.” This website can be used and presented to understanding Web 3.0.The website contains, www.espn.com, not only can be accessed on the computer but it can be accessed using mobile technology. The website also has two way communication where someone can write an article and someone can comment back on it expressing their ideas. If you access www.espn.com from a mobile device it is contains a different layout than on the computer but it is altered very minimal. When using a mobile device to access the website you can do basically everything that you can on a computer. It is just a little more compact. Therefore this causes this website to be an example of Web 3.0.

 

The website relates to the article “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits.” This is because according to the article a Web 3.0 allows for two way communication amongst the readers and writers of the website. The author of the piece on the website can alter what they say. A viewer can comment on the piece that they read. Also on this website you can access it from a mobile phone. The website is easy to read and is not really altered if you access it using a mobile device. The article states that if a website is Web 3.0 it must be able to be accessed on a mobile device which this site can be. Therefore this makes www.espn.com an example of Web 3.0.

 

Resources


Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

have mobile technology, videos and comments making it a 3.0.

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Cars

Cars | Evan Maslin's CMC 375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

This website that I created is an example of Web 1.0 that is discussed in the Nonprofitorgs article, “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits.” This website can be used and presented to understanding Web 1.0. This is because this website was created by one person, me. The website only has one way communication where I can only update the information and send it out. The creator of the website is the only one who can alter the information. By being very basic and organized to only express content it makes the website fall under Web 1.0.

 

The website relates to the article “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits.” This is because according to the article a Web 1.0 is something like a website where the content can only be changed by one person. There is only one way communication which can occur. This website contains all of the above by only one person being able to change the data on it and update information. Also the website creator can only send out information to its viewers. The viewers cannot contact the creator therefore making the website a Web 1.0.

 

Resources


Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Twitter

Twitter is an example of informal CMC that is discussed in the Hrastinski article, “Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations.” Twitter can be can be used and presented to understanding informal CMC. Twitter can be very informal in several different ways. This is because it is a social media site that first of all limits the amount of information you can tweet at a time. You can only tweet 140 characters at a time, therefore making your tweets very short. Also on twitter people use slang terminology and abbreviations. By being slang and using abbreviations it makes this site extremely informal. Anyone who tweets is not worrying about being professional or being grammatically correct. Instead they are just trying to get a message out there, usually an update on what they are doing. Overall people don’t care what they say on twitter and usually don’t monitor it but instead they post at their free will making it extremely informal CMC.

 

Twitter relates to the article “Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations.” This is because the article explains that “informal conversations take place at the time, with the participants and the topics at hand. Also informal CMC is generally impromptu, brief, context-rich and dyadic and support joint problem solving, coordination and social bonding, and social learning. All of these aspects are essential for complex collaboration.” By people being brief and impromptu it makes your communication very informal. On Twitter people are very brief and their tweets are usually unorganized. Most of the time one tweet has no relation to another tweet. Tweets are posted at random, and can be posted either close to one another or posted much later on. The article explains that people use informal CMC when they know the people who they are talking to. An informal environment occurs when you are familiar with the people you are talking to. On Twitter you can hide your identity therefore allowing you to be as informal as you want to be. No one can judge you or say anything because your followers are usually people you know. It is one of those social media sites that is meant for using informal CMC.

 

Resources


Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Sign In | LinkedIn

Linkedin is an example of networking that is discussed in the Boyd, and Ellison article, “Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship.” Linkedin can be used and presented to understanding networking. On Linkedin you can connect with friends, classmates, colleagues, other, or people who have done business together. By being able to connect with these people you can build connections to them and their businesses. By being able to form connections it can bring someone one step closer to finding a job that will satisfy their needs. Also on Linkedin you can search your connections and see their connections. By doing this you can build up more connections which will help you out in the future. Linkedin is very professional, which most professionals use. If you meet these professionals you can connect to them. Linkedin is basically a more formal type of Facebook which allows you to make professional connections. Also if you have an updated profile, certain businesses can look on Linkedin and even connect to you if they feel like you can be an asset to their company.

 

Linkedin relates to the article “Social Network Sites: Definition, History and Scholarship.” This is because the article states that “social network sites are unique and allow individuals to meet strangers, but rather that they enable users to articulate and make visible their social networks. This can result in connections between individuals that would allow them to have later ties, also known as connections.” Linkedin is a great example of networking due to its sole purpose being meant for networking. Linkedin brings strangers or friends or people you know together. This allows people to build connections. The article explains that social media sites, such as Linkedin allow people to connect to one another. By people connecting to one another they can build connections that can help them out and help out their futures. Social networking sites allow people to network over the internet. Eventually this can allow them to become more successful and connected better in the long run.

 

Resources


Boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). "Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. Available at Library in eholdings database.

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Redirecting...

Facebook is an example of identity development that is discussed in the Ellison, Heino, and Gibbs article, “Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment.” Facebook can be used and presented to understanding identity building. On Facebook, a user can change their information in several different ways in order to control their identity. One way a user can hide and protect themselves by limiting the information provided. Another way a user can alter their information. They can provide false information in order to protect who they are. This sometimes is done in order to hide who they actual are. Lastly, someone can post their actual information. Most people do this to some extent. People can post who they are, their relationship status, their hometown, where they went to school and also when their birthday is. This is just some of the information that a user has control of in order to build their identity.

 

Facebook relates to the article “Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment.” This is because the article states that “there are multiple aspects of themselves which are expressed or made salient in different contexts.” As the article states a user can control who they present themselves and their identity. By Facebook having so many options and abilities someone can present themselves as they want to. The article states that there are three domains of the self. These consist of the actual self, the ideal self and ought to be self. The actual self contains the attributes an individual possesses, the ideal self is the attributes an individual would ideally possess and ought to be self is the attributes an individual ought to possess. Facebook is the actual self because it contains the attributes an individual possesses. Facebook provides all the information about a person but the person can limit the information, who the information is available to and lastly, they have total control of the information at all times. By having total control a user can change and control who sees the information about them. Therefore, this allows them to develop their identity as they would like to.

 

Resources


Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (2006). Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(2), article 2.http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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New Ways to Communicate Online: Composica

New Ways to Communicate Online: Composica | Evan Maslin's CMC 375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

This blog post is an example of Web 2.0 that is discussed in the Nonprofitorgs article, “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits.” This blog post can be used and presented to understanding Web 2.0.The blog post contains two way communication where the writer was able to post information and someone can comment back on it. The publisher of the blog is the only one who can change the content and write the content of the blog. Social media websites can republish the information written in this blog post if they would like. By blog posts being able to be republished it can connect followers, fans, and friends. These people can than comment back on the blog post and say what they like or what needs to be changed. Therefore this causes this blog post to be an example of Web 2.0.

 

The blog post relates to the article “Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits.” This is because according to the article a Web 2.0 allows for two way communication amongst readers and the writer of the blog post. The creator can alter the information if they need to. Readers can comment back on the blog post just like the article states. By having a comment section on the blog post it allows for two way communication. This therefore makes a blog post an example of Web 2.0.

 

Resources


Nonprofitorgs (2010). Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 Simplified for Nonprofits. Available at: http://nonprofitorgs.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/web-1-0-web-2-0-and-web-3-0-simplified-for-nonprofits/

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Blackboard Group Discussion Board for Project

The blackboard group discussion board for the main project is an example of CMC language that is discussed that is discussed in the Herring article, “A Faceted Classification Scheme for Computer-Mediated Discourse.” The blackboard group discussion board can be used and presented to understanding CMC language. This is because throughout the whole discussion board everyone who writes in it has their own distinctive language. Anyone who writes in this discussion board writes in a different style. By being able to write in your own style you can express what you are trying to say. Some people have different abbreviations for certain words but in the end everything that is written provides a different language that is used.

 

The blackboard group discussion board for the project relates to the article “A Faceted Classification Scheme for Computer-Mediated Discourse.” This is because the article describes that throughout computer mediated communication, people have different languages that they use. The written language that certain people use may be different and could be misunderstood. On the blackboard discussion board, there are a lot of different variations of the written language that is used. By people writing differently it might be understood by others but it also has the capability to be misunderstood. CMC language explains that sometimes different written languages might be misunderstood due to people writing something that others might not understand. CMC written language must always be worried about when communicating across the internet due to people sometimes writing one thing but potentially meaning another.

 

Resources


Herring, S. (Classification) (2007) A Faceted Classification Scheme for Computer-Mediated Discourse. Language@Internet (4). Available at http://www.citeulike.org/user/jtmorgan/article/2857744

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New Ways to Communicate Online: Google Earth

New Ways to Communicate Online: Google Earth | Evan Maslin's CMC 375 Portfolio | Scoop.it

This blog post is an example of formal CMC that is discussed in the Hrastinski article, “Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations.” This blog can be used and presented to understanding formal CMC. On a blog post the writer needs to write with very formal and professional language. This is because a blog post can be read by anyone and if you do not write in a professional and formal manner people can become turned off from your post. By writing grammatically correct, with proper spelling than your blog post can be enjoyed and read by others. If you write informally and are not grammatically correct than people will not take your information seriously. The more formal your writing the better off you will be in the long run. So, when you write a blog post, if you want lots of viewers and people to understand everything you are saying than you must write formally. A blog post might be meant for your peers but it can be read by anyone. If you want to have a successful blog post than you need to be organized when writing it. Always proof read to make sure you get the point out. Also by proof reading, it will allow a blogger to make sure that their work makes sense and that the post is coherent and can be understood by the target audience.

 

This blog post relates to the article “Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations.” This is because the article explains that in certain situations people use formal language in certain situations while other situations people become a lot less informal. For example the article states that in an IM chat room people are going to usually be less informal. This is because you know the people who you are chatting with. But the use of Formal CMC comes into play when you write a blog post or anything that is meant for anyone on the internet. IM chats are usually private while blog posts are not. Like the article states anytime when anything can be viewed by anyone over the internet people need to be formal, and make sure that they are grammatically correct. This is because no one is going to read a post if it is not coherent and makes absolutely no sense. Lastly, by being formal it improves your ethos and credibility and will basically convince people to keep on reading your posts due to the formality of them.

 

Resources


Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Twitter

Twitter is an example of filtering that is discussed in the Gorman article, “Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate News From Noise.” Twitter can be used and presented to understanding filtering. On Twitter, for example the #OWS search takes you to the occupy Wall Street area. On this page a viewer needs to filter everything that is said. This is because some information said may have nothing to do with the current topic. Some information might be biased while other information might be accurate. By being able to filter a site such as twitter, one can learn and understand what will actually help them out in the long run and what actually contains useless information that has no relation to the topic at all. If you can filter information properly than as a user, you will be able to control what is accurate or not. Also by filtering information properly you, as a user will be able to understand that information is sometimes false and has nothing to do with the topic. For example on the #OWS, twitter page there is a lot of information that relates nothing to the current topic and a lot of information is biased. After separating and filtering this information one can learn and understand what Occupy Wall Street actually is and what is going on.

 

Twitter relates to the article “Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate News From Noise.” This is because the article states that “social media sites are being used as new tools for journalists, protesters and everyday people looking for news.” If people cannot filter information properly than this may lead to posting inaccurate information when they write and article. If this information is inaccurate it will cause people to disbelieve what the author is writing about. By being able to filter information, one can become a successful writer and viewer of other articles. The article relates to twitter because it states that so many people are using these social media sites incorrectly. Journalists and other writers are gathering incorrect information and relaying this to their viewers. Once people learn how to filter information properly than the confusion and use of inaccurate information can be avoided.

 

Resources


Gorman, T. (2011) Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate News From Noise. Available at http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html

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Redirecting...

Facebook is an example of community building that is discussed in the Ellison, Steinfield and Lampe article, The benefits of Facebook “friends:” Social capital and college students’ use of online social network sites. Facebook can be used and presented to understanding community building. On Facebook a user can locate people you know or friends of yours by simply clicking on one of your friends, friends list. You can then go and search for these people in a simple and easy process by searching through your friends Facebook. Also when you go to your home page a link comes up. This link states your friends you may know. You may not be friends with some people on Facebook until they show up under “People You May Know.” By using Facebook to build your community and friends it may actually help you build assets in the long run. Now a day’s basically everyone is on Facebook and if you can build your Facebook community with people who are employed, it may actually help you in the long run. These people can become connections which can allow you to have access to jobs that other people may not have.

 

Facebook relates to the article “The benefits of Facebook “friends:” Social capital and college students’ use of online social network sites.” This is because the article states that “Facebook constitutes a rich site for researchers interested in the affordances of social networks due to its heavy usage patterns and technological capacities that bridge online and offline connections.” Facebook is believed to connect people both online and offline and by doing so it allows people to expand their connections and resources to companies and different communities amongst different job fields. The article discusses how Facebook, as well as other online social network sites, have allowed people to make new connections which actually help them learn a specific job field. The article also states how these connections are used to help people become more successful and become more connected in the long run.

 

Resources


Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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