Clybourne Park Dramaturgy
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Clybourne Park - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Clybourne Park (2010) is a play by Bruce Norris written in response to Lorraine Hansberry's play A Raisin in the Sun (1959); it portrays fictional events set before and after the Hansberry play and is loosely based on historical events based in the city of Chicago. It premiered in February 2010 at Playwrights Horizons in New York.[1] The play received its UK premiere at the Royal Court Theatre in London in a production directed by Dominic Cooke. The play received its Chicago premiere at Steppenwolf Theatre Company in a production directed by Steppenwolf ensemble member Amy Morton.[2] As described by the Washington Post, the play "applies a modern twist to the issues of race and housing and aspirations for a better life."[3] The play was awarded the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and the 2012 Tony Award for Best Play.

Grieving parents Bev and Russ are planning to sell their home in the white middle-class Chicago neighborhood of Clybourne Park. They receive a visit from their local clergyman, as well as a neighbor and his deaf, pregnant wife; the neighbor informs them that the family buying the house is black, and pleads with the couple to back out of the deal, for fear that area property values will fall if black residents move in. It becomes apparent that the black family moving in are the Youngers, the protagonists of A Raisin in the Sun, and the neighbor, Karl, is Karl Lindner, the minor character from that play who attempts to bribe the Youngers into abandoning their plans to move into the neighborhood. As arguments ensue about the potential problems of integrating the neighborhood, both couples awkwardly call on Russ and Bev's black housekeeper and her husband to express their opposing views. Russ finally snaps and throws everyone out of the house, saying he no longer cares about his neighbors after their callousness and cruelty to his son Kenneth when he returned home from the Korean War. Kenneth later committed suicide on the upper floor of their home.

Set in the same home as Act I, the same actors reappear playing different characters. In the intervening fifty years, Clybourne Park has become an all-black neighborhood, which is now gentrifying. A white couple seeking to buy and replace the house are being forced to negotiate with local housing regulations with a black couple representing a neighborhood organization. The white couple's lawyer, the daughter of the neighbor and his deaf wife, mentions that her family moved out of the neighborhood around the time of her birth; the black wife is a relative of the family who bought the home from Bev and Russ. The discussion of housing codes soon degenerates into one of racial issues, revealing resentments from both parties. While this is happening, a workman finds an old trunk that Russ has buried in the back yard, with some of the things of their son, including his final letter.

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The Foreclosure Crisis Is Still Hurting Black Homeowners in Chicago - Chicagomag.com

The Foreclosure Crisis Is Still Hurting Black Homeowners in Chicago - Chicagomag.com | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
Chicagomag.com The Foreclosure Crisis Is Still Hurting Black Homeowners in Chicago Chicagomag.com Walter Lee Younger (Jerod Haynes, center) dreams of a better life for his wife, Ruth (Toni Martin, left), and mother, Lena (Greta Oglesby), in...
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A Devastatingly Good Read on San Francisco's Gentrification ...

A Devastatingly Good Read on San Francisco's Gentrification ... | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
Jasmine Johnson writes of love and loss at Gawker.
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Author fury at blackface casting

Author fury at blackface casting | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
Clybourne Park playwright Bruce Norris refuses permission to a Berlin theatre company to perform the play after learning that a lead character would appear blacked up.
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To Be Young, Gifted, and Black

To Be Young, Gifted, and Black | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
In her first play, the now-classic A Raisin in the Sun, Hansberry introduced the lives of ordinary African Americans into our national th...

Via Donna Anderson
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Donna Anderson's curator insight, May 27, 2013 7:05 AM

We will try to read this one at the same time with A Raisin in the Sun.

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Carol Halstead, Greg Jackson and More Cast in Barrington's Clybourne Park - Playbill.com

Carol Halstead, Greg Jackson and More Cast in Barrington's Clybourne Park Playbill.com Barrington Stage Company, under the leadership of artistic director Julianne Boyd and managing director Tristan Wilson, will present the Pulitzer and Tony...
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All Placemaking is Creative: How a Shared Focus on Place Builds Vibrant Destinations

All Placemaking is Creative: How a Shared Focus on Place Builds Vibrant Destinations | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it

Placemaking is a process, accessible to anyone, that allows peoples’ creativity to emerge. When open and inclusive, this process can be extraordinarily effective in making people feel attached to the places where they live. That makes people more likely to get involved and build shared wealth in their communities.


“Placemaking, applied correctly, can show us new ways to help cultures emerge where openness is not so scary,” notes Dr. Katherine Loflin, the lead project consultant for the Knight Foundation’s groundbreaking study, which showed a significant correlation between community attachment and economic growth. “We could find with consistency over time that it was the softer side of place—social offerings, openness, and aesthetics—that really seem to drive peoples’ attachment to their place. It wasn’t necessarily basic services: how well potholes got paved over. It wasn’t even necessarily for peoples’ personal economic circumstances.”

The study’s other key finding was that there is an empirical relationship between higher levels of attachment and cities’ GDP growth.

Placemaking, in other words, is a vital part of economic development. And yet, there has long been criticism that calls into question whether or not this process is actually helping communities to develop their local economies, or merely accelerating the process of gentrification in formerly-maligned urban core neighborhoods. We believe that this is largely due to confusion over what Placemaking is, and who “gets” to be involved. If Placemaking is project-led, development-led, design-led or artist-led, then it does likely lead to gentrification and a more limited set of community outcomes.

 

Read the complete article for more on the process of placemaking and the roles community members play in creating vibrant spaces...


Via Lauren Moss
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Katharine Norman's curator insight, March 15, 2013 3:16 AM

Positive aspects from being connected to your community.

 

Jennifer Stencel's curator insight, July 3, 2015 12:47 PM

Libraries are an important fixture to create PLACE in their community. But are we doing it?

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The Hub Review: What we talk about when we talk about what we talk about when we talk about race

The Hub Review: What we talk about when we talk about what we talk about when we talk about race | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
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Is art really to blame for gentrification? | openDemocracy

Is art really to blame for gentrification? | openDemocracy | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
Art is being used as a medium for gentrification, as the middle class displaces that of the working class in poorer urban areas. While the superficiality of this movement is apparent, should the good name of art suffer as a result ...
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A Visit to Clybourne Park: This Old House

A Visit to Clybourne Park: This Old House | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
HowStuffWorks.com blogger Sarah Dowdey discusses the play Clybourne Park with director Pam MacKinnon. (Great insights about set and importance of this house.
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The Gentrification Test

Is your neighborhood falling victim to gentrification? What city is it in? And what do you miss about the old hood? Credits: Song: http://soundcloud.com/blck...
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Gentrification Is Not About Race and Class, but Fear of Outsiders - Pacific Standard

Gentrification Is Not About Race and Class, but Fear of Outsiders - Pacific Standard | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it

Emphasis added. Is racism at the heart of the “gentrification” problem? What about class? Among professional geographers, the definition of the term is contested. You know it when you see it. Gentrification expresses class warfare spatially. I think of gentrification as the tension between the mobile and the stuck.


Via jean lievens
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A Witness to Gentrification in Cobble Hill - New York Times

A Witness to Gentrification in Cobble Hill - New York Times | Clybourne Park Dramaturgy | Scoop.it
New York Times A Witness to Gentrification in Cobble Hill New York Times The block long sidestepped the gentrification that has transformed so much of brownstone Brooklyn, in part because its houses are more modest than some and commercial...
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